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2.
Molecules ; 27(3)2022 Jan 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674736

ABSTRACT

Butyrate is a major gut microbiome metabolite that regulates several defense mechanisms against infectious diseases. Alterations in the gut microbiome, leading to reduced butyrate production, have been reported in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. A new butyrate releaser, useful for all the known applications of butyrate, presenting physiochemical characteristics suitable for easy oral administration, (N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenyl-ethyl) butyramide (FBA), has been recently developed. We investigated the protective action of FBA against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the human small intestine and enterocytes. Relevant aspects of SARS-CoV-2 infection were assessed: infectivity, host functional receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), neuropilin-1 (NRP1), pro-inflammatory cytokines expression, genes involved in the antiviral response and the activation of Nf-kB nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like) 2 (Nfr2) pathways. We found that FBA positively modulates the crucial aspects of the infection in small intestinal biopsies and human enterocytes, reducing the expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2 and NRP1, pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α, and regulating several genes involved in antiviral pathways. FBA was also able to reduce the number of SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, and ACE2, TMPRSS2 and NRP1 expression. Lastly, through the inhibition of Nf-kB and the up-regulation of Nfr2, it was also able to reduce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-15, MCP-1 and TNF-α in human enterocytes. The new butyrate releaser, FBA, exerts a preventive action against SARS-CoV-2 infection. It could be considered as an innovative strategy to limit COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Butyrates/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Butyrates/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Caco-2 Cells , Enterocytes/drug effects , Enterocytes/metabolism , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Intestines/drug effects , Intestines/metabolism , Male , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
Cell Mol Life Sci ; 79(2): 94, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653404

ABSTRACT

Numerous post-translational modifications (PTMs) govern the collective metabolism of a cell through altering the structure and functions of proteins. The action of the most prevalent PTMs, encompassing phosphorylation, methylation, acylations, ubiquitination and glycosylation is well documented. A less explored protein PTM, conversion of peptidylarginine to citrulline, is the subject of this review. The process of citrullination is catalysed by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), a family of conserved enzymes expressed in a variety of human tissues. Accumulating evidence suggest that citrullination plays a significant role in regulating cellular metabolism and gene expression by affecting a multitude of pathways and modulating the chromatin status. Here, we will discuss the biochemical nature of arginine citrullination, the enzymatic machinery behind it and also provide information on the pathological consequences of citrullination in the development of inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, periodontitis and COVID-19), cancer and thromboembolism. Finally, developments on inhibitors against protein citrullination and recent clinical trials providing a promising therapeutic approach to inflammatory disease by targeting citrullination are discussed.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/pathology , Citrullination/physiology , Inflammation/pathology , Protein Processing, Post-Translational/physiology , Protein-Arginine Deiminases/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Citrulline/biosynthesis , Energy Metabolism/physiology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thromboembolism/pathology
4.
STAR Protoc ; 3(1): 101067, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595326

ABSTRACT

N 6 -methylation of adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal mRNA modification and is an important post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq) to detect and quantify m6A modifications in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA. The protocol is optimized for low viral RNA levels and is readily adaptable for other applications. For complete details on the use and execution of this protocol, please refer to Li et al. (2021).


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Immunoprecipitation/methods , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Adenosine/analysis , Adenosine/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Genetic Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Methylation , RNA/chemistry , RNA/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells
5.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 146, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, the world witnessed the emergence and ravages of a viral infection induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Also known as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has been identified as a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization (WHO) because of its severity. METHODS: The gene data of 51 samples were extracted from the GSE150316 and GSE147507 data set and then processed by means of the programming language R, through which the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that meet the standards were screened. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed on the selected DEGs to understand the functions and approaches of DEGs. The online tool STRING was employed to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs and, in turn, to identify hub genes. RESULTS: A total of 52 intersection genes were obtained through DEG identification. Through the GO analysis, we realized that the biological processes (BPs) that have the deepest impact on the human body after SARS-CoV-2 infection are various immune responses. By using STRING to construct a PPI network, 10 hub genes were identified, including IFIH1, DDX58, ISG15, EGR1, OASL, SAMD9, SAMD9L, XAF1, IFITM1, and TNFSF10. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will hopefully provide guidance for future studies on the pathophysiological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Ontology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung/virology , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22958, 2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537338

ABSTRACT

Understanding key host protective mechanisms against SARS-CoV-2 infection can help improve treatment modalities for COVID-19. We used a blood transcriptome approach to study biomarkers associated with differing severity of COVID-19, comparing severe and mild Symptomatic disease with Asymptomatic COVID-19 and uninfected Controls. There was suppression of antigen presentation but upregulation of inflammatory and viral mRNA translation associated pathways in Symptomatic as compared with Asymptomatic cases. In severe COVID-19, CD177 a neutrophil marker, was upregulated while interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were downregulated. Asymptomatic COVID-19 cases displayed upregulation of ISGs and humoral response genes with downregulation of ICAM3 and TLR8. Compared across the COVID-19 disease spectrum, we found type I interferon (IFN) responses to be significantly upregulated (IFNAR2, IRF2BP1, IRF4, MAVS, SAMHD1, TRIM1), or downregulated (SOCS3, IRF2BP2, IRF2BPL) in Asymptomatic as compared with mild and severe COVID-19, with the dysregulation of an increasing number of ISGs associated with progressive disease. These data suggest that initial early responses against SARS-CoV-2 may be effectively controlled by ISGs. Therefore, we hypothesize that treatment with type I interferons in the early stage of COVID-19 may limit disease progression by limiting SARS-CoV-2 in the host.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Carrier State/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Female , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22913, 2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537333

ABSTRACT

Inflammation is a physiological process whose deregulation causes some diseases including cancer. Nuclear Factor kB (NF-kB) is a family of ubiquitous and inducible transcription factors, in which the p65/p50 heterodimer is the most abundant complex, that play critical roles mainly in inflammation. Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and acts as an anti-inflammatory agent and immunosuppressant. Thus, NF-kB and GR are physiological antagonists in the inflammation process. Here we show that in mice and humans there is a spliced variant of p65, named p65 iso5, which binds the corticosteroid hormone dexamethasone amplifying the effect of the glucocorticoid receptor and is expressed in the liver of patients with hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, we have quantified the gene expression level of p65 and p65 iso5 in the PBMC of patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 disease. The results showed that in these patients the p65 and p65 iso5 mRNA levels are higher than in healthy subjects. The ability of p65 iso5 to bind dexamethasone and the regulation of the glucocorticoid (GC) response in the opposite way of the wild type improves our knowledge and understanding of the anti-inflammatory response and identifies it as a new therapeutic target to control inflammation and related diseases.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/immunology , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/metabolism , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/metabolism , Adult , Alternative Splicing , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/metabolism , Dexamethasone/metabolism , Female , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Glucocorticoids/metabolism , Hepatitis/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Liver Diseases/immunology , Liver Neoplasms/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Middle Aged , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Protein Isoforms , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcription Factor RelA/immunology , Transcription Factor RelA/physiology
8.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 45(3): 537-550, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and Diabetes mellitus affect each other bidirectionally. However, the cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) infection on the incidence of diabetes is unclear. In the SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, host microRNAs (miRNAs) may target the native gene transcripts as well as the viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Here, we investigated the role of miRNAs in linking Diabetes to SARS-CoV-2 infection in the human pancreas. METHODS: Differential gene expression and disease enrichment analyses were performed on an RNA-Seq dataset of human embryonic stem cell-derived (hESC) mock-infected and SARS-CoV-2-infected pancreatic organoids to obtain the dysregulated Diabetes-associated genes. The miRNA target prediction for the Diabetes-associated gene transcripts and the SARS-CoV-2 RNAs has been made to determine the common miRNAs targeting them. Minimum Free Energy (MFE) analysis was done to identify the miRNAs, preferably targeting SARS-CoV-2 RNAs over the Diabetes-associated gene transcripts. RESULTS: The gene expression and disease enrichment analyses of the RNA-Seq data have revealed five biomarker genes, i.e., CP, SOCS3, AGT, PSMB8 and CFB that are associated with Diabetes and get significantly upregulated in the pancreas following SARS-CoV-2-infection. Four miRNAs, i.e., hsa-miR-298, hsa-miR-3925-5p, hsa-miR-4691-3p and hsa-miR-5196-5p, showed preferential targeting of the SARS-CoV-2 genome over the cell's Diabetes-associated messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the human pancreas. CONCLUSION: Our study proposes that the differential targeting of the Diabetes-associated host genes by the miRNAs may lead to diabetic complications or new-onset Diabetes that can worsen the condition of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Pancreas/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , 3' Untranslated Regions/genetics , 5' Untranslated Regions/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Pancreas/chemistry , Pancreas/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 727861, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477822

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory response is a host-protective mechanism against tissue injury or infections, but also has the potential to cause extensive immunopathology and tissue damage, as seen in many diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic syndrome and many other infectious diseases with public health concerns, such as Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), if failure to resolve in a timely manner. Recent studies have uncovered a superfamily of endogenous chemical molecules that tend to resolve inflammatory responses and re-establish homeostasis without causing excessive damage to healthy cells and tissues. Among these, the monocyte chemoattractant protein-induced protein (MCPIP) family consisting of four members (MCPIP-1, -2, -3, and -4) has emerged as a group of evolutionarily conserved molecules participating in the resolution of inflammation. The focus of this review highlights the biological functions of MCPIP-1 (also known as Regnase-1), the best-studied member of this family, in the resolution of inflammatory response. As outlined in this review, MCPIP-1 acts on specific signaling pathways, in particular NFκB, to blunt production of inflammatory mediators, while also acts as an endonuclease controlling the stability of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), leading to the resolution of inflammation, clearance of virus and dead cells, and promotion of tissue regeneration via its pleiotropic effects. Evidence from transgenic and knock-out mouse models revealed an involvement of MCPIP-1 expression in immune functions and in the physiology of the cardiovascular system, indicating that MCPIP-1 is a key endogenous molecule that governs normal resolution of acute inflammation and infection. In this review, we also discuss the current evidence underlying the roles of other members of the MCPIP family in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Further understanding of the proteins from this family will provide new insights into the identification of novel targets for both host effectors and microbial factors and will lead to new therapeutic treatments for infections and other inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Ribonucleases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcription Factors/immunology , Animals , Apoptosis/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Mice , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , Transcriptional Activation/immunology , Ubiquitination
10.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 143: 112095, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392164

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is one of the major components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and participates in the physiological functions of the cardiovascular system and lungs. Recent studies identified ACE2 as the receptor for the S-protein of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and thus acts as the gateway for viral entry into the human body. Virus infection causes an imbalance in the RAS axis and induces acute lungs injury and fibrosis. Various factors regulate ACE2 expression patterns as well as control its epigenetic status at both transcription and translational levels. This review is mainly focused on the impact of environmental toxicants, drugs, endocrine disruptors, and hypoxia as controlling parameters for ACE2 expression and its possible modulation by epigenetic changes which are marked by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) profile. Furthermore, we have emphasized on interventions of various phytochemicals and bioactive compounds as epidrugs that regulate ACE2-S-protein interaction and thereby curb viral infection. Since ACE2 is an important component of the RAAS axis and a crucial entry point of SARS-CoV-2, the dynamics of ACE2 expression in response to various extrinsic and intrinsic factors are of contemporary relevance. We have collated updated information on ACE2 expression modulated by epidrugs, and urge to take over further studies on these important physiological regulators to unravel many more systemic linkages related to both metabolic and infectious diseases, in general and SARS-CoV-2 in particular for further development of targeted interventions.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19 , Epigenesis, Genetic , Hazardous Substances , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Hazardous Substances/adverse effects , Hazardous Substances/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 707287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359191

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become an international public health crisis, and the number of cases with dengue co-infection has raised concerns. Unfortunately, treatment options are currently limited or even unavailable. Thus, the aim of our study was to explore the underlying mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets for co-infection. Methods: To further understand the mechanisms underlying co-infection, we used a series of bioinformatics analyses to build host factor interaction networks and elucidate biological process and molecular function categories, pathway activity, tissue-specific enrichment, and potential therapeutic agents. Results: We explored the pathologic mechanisms of COVID-19 and dengue co-infection, including predisposing genes, significant pathways, biological functions, and possible drugs for intervention. In total, 460 shared host factors were collected; among them, CCL4 and AhR targets were important. To further analyze biological functions, we created a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network and performed Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE) analysis. In addition, common signaling pathways were acquired, and the toll-like receptor and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways exerted a significant effect on the interaction. Upregulated genes were identified based on the activity score of dysregulated genes, such as IL-1, Hippo, and TNF-α. We also conducted tissue-specific enrichment analysis and found ICAM-1 and CCL2 to be highly expressed in the lung. Finally, candidate drugs were screened, including resveratrol, genistein, and dexamethasone. Conclusions: This study probes host factor interaction networks for COVID-19 and dengue and provides potential drugs for clinical practice. Although the findings need to be verified, they contribute to the treatment of co-infection and the management of respiratory disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Computational Biology/methods , Dengue/drug therapy , Dengue/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/physiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Coinfection , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Genistein/therapeutic use , Humans , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Resveratrol/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 700152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359189

ABSTRACT

Background: Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are considered to participate of the host immune response against acute severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection; however, single-cell transcriptomic profiling of MAIT cells in patients with COVID-19 remains unexplored. Methods: We performed single-cell RNA sequencing analyses on peripheral MAIT cells from 13 patients with COVID-19 and 5 healthy donors. The transcriptional profiles of MAIT cells, together with assembled T-cell receptor sequences, were analyzed. Flow cytometry analysis was also performed to investigate the properties of MAIT cells. Results: We identified that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of MAIT cells were involved in myeloid leukocyte activation and lymphocyte activation in patients with COVID-19. In addition, in MAIT cells from severe cases, more DEGs were enriched in adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses compared with those in moderate cases. Further analysis indicated that the increase of cell cytotoxicity (killing), chemotaxis, and apoptosis levels in MAIT cells were consistent with disease severity and displayed the highest levels in patients with severe disease. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis showed that the frequencies of pyroptotic MAIT cells, but not the frequencies of apoptotic MAIT cells, were increased significantly in patients with COVID-19, suggesting pyroptosis is one of leading causes of MAIT cell deaths during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Importantly, there were more clonal expansions of MAIT cells in severe cases than in moderate cases. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that MAIT cells are likely to be involved in the host immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Simultaneously, the transcriptomic data from MAIT cells provides a deeper understanding of the immune pathogenesis of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics , Base Sequence , COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/genetics , Pyroptosis/physiology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , VDJ Exons/genetics
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 652223, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348483

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly contagious and presents a significant public health issue. Current therapies used to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) include monoclonal antibody cocktail, convalescent plasma, antivirals, immunomodulators, and anticoagulants. The vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna have recently been authorized for emergency use, which are invaluable for the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their long-term side effects are not yet documented, and populations with immunocompromised conditions (e.g., organ-transplantation and immunodeficient patients) may not be able to mount an effective immune response. In addition, there are concerns that wide-scale immunity to SARS-CoV-2 may introduce immune pressure that could select for escape mutants to the existing vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies. Emerging evidence has shown that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)- natural killer (NK) immunotherapy has potent antitumor response in hematologic cancers with minimal adverse effects in recent studies, however, the potentials of CAR-NK cells in treating COVID-19 has not yet been fully exploited. Here, we improve upon a novel approach for the generation of CAR-NK cells for targeting SARS-CoV-2 and its various mutants. CAR-NK cells were generated using the scFv domain of S309 (henceforward, S309-CAR-NK), a SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAbs) that targets the highly conserved region of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein and is therefore more likely to recognize different variants of SARS-CoV-2 isolates. S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically bind to pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 virus and its D614G, N501Y, and E484K mutants. Furthermore, S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically kill target cells expressing SARS-CoV-2 S protein in vitro and show superior killing activity and cytokine production, compared to that of the recently reported CR3022-CAR-NK cells. Thus, these results pave the way for generating 'off-the-shelf' S309-CAR-NK cells for treatment in high-risk individuals as well as provide an alternative strategy for patients unresponsive to current vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , A549 Cells , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
14.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309589

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by the newly discovered coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Increased severity of COVID-19 has been observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to identify common transcriptional signatures, regulators and pathways between COVID-19 and DM. We have integrated human whole-genome transcriptomic datasets from COVID-19 and DM, followed by functional assessment with gene ontology (GO) and pathway analyses. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), among the upregulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 32 were found to be commonly modulated in COVID-19 and type 2 diabetes (T2D), while 10 DEGs were commonly downregulated. As regards type 1 diabetes (T1D), 21 DEGs were commonly upregulated, and 29 DEGs were commonly downregulated in COVID-19 and T1D. Moreover, 35 DEGs were commonly upregulated in SARS-CoV-2 infected pancreas organoids and T2D islets, while 14 were commonly downregulated. Several GO terms were found in common between COVID-19 and DM. Prediction of the putative transcription factors involved in the upregulation of genes in COVID-19 and DM identified RELA to be implicated in both PBMCs and pancreas. Here, for the first time, we have characterized the biological processes and pathways commonly dysregulated in COVID-19 and DM, which could be in the next future used for the design of personalized treatment of COVID-19 patients suffering from DM as comorbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Transcriptome/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307525

ABSTRACT

Gene expression and immune status in human tissues are changed with aging. There is a need to develop a comprehensive platform to explore the dynamics of age-related gene expression and immune profiles across tissues in genome-wide studies. Here, we collected RNA-Seq datasets from GTEx project, containing 16 704 samples from 30 major tissues in six age groups ranging from 20 to 79 years old. Dynamic gene expression along with aging were depicted and gene set enrichment analysis was performed among those age groups. Genes from 34 known immune function categories and immune cell compositions were investigated and compared among different age groups. Finally, we integrated all the results and developed a platform named ADEIP (http://gb.whu.edu.cn/ADEIP or http://geneyun.net/ADEIP), integrating the age-dependent gene expression and immune profiles across tissues. To demonstrate the usage of ADEIP, we applied two datasets: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and human mesenchymal stem cells-assoicated genes. We also included the expression and immune dynamics of these genes in the platform. Collectively, ADEIP is a powerful platform for studying age-related immune regulation in organogenesis and other infectious or genetic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Organ Specificity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Seq , Young Adult
16.
mBio ; 12(4): e0106721, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297962

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an ongoing global public crisis. Although viral RNA modification has been reported based on the transcriptome architecture, the types and functions of RNA modification are still unknown. In this study, we evaluated the roles of RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification in SARS-CoV-2. Our methylated RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeRIP-Seq) and Nanopore direct RNA sequencing (DRS) analysis showed that SARS-CoV-2 RNA contained m6A modification. Moreover, SARS-CoV-2 infection not only increased the expression of methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3) but also altered its distribution. Modification of METTL3 expression by short hairpin RNA or plasmid transfection for knockdown or overexpression, respectively, affected viral replication. Furthermore, the viral key protein RdRp interacted with METTL3, and METTL3 was distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in the presence of RdRp. RdRp appeared to modulate the sumoylation and ubiquitination of METTL3 via an unknown mechanism. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that the host m6A modification complex interacted with viral proteins to modulate SARS-CoV-2 replication. IMPORTANCE Internal chemical modifications of viral RNA play key roles in the regulation of viral replication and gene expression. Although potential internal modifications have been reported in SARS-CoV-2 RNA, the function of the SARS-CoV-2 N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification in the viral life cycle is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 RNA underwent m6A modification by host m6A machinery. SARS-CoV-2 infection altered the expression pattern of methyltransferases and demethylases, while the expression level of methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3) and fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO) was linked to the viral replication. Further study showed that METTL3 interacted with viral RNA polymerase RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which influenced not only the distribution but also the posttranslational modification of METTL3. Our study provided evidence that host m6A components interacted with viral proteins to modulate viral replication.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Methyltransferases/genetics , Methyltransferases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virus Replication/genetics , Adenosine/chemistry , Adenosine/genetics , Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Methylation , Protein Processing, Post-Translational/physiology , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11130, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246392

ABSTRACT

The sex discordance in COVID-19 outcomes has been widely recognized, with males generally faring worse than females and a potential link to sex steroids. A plausible mechanism is androgen-induced expression of TMPRSS2 and/or ACE2 in pulmonary tissues that may increase susceptibility or severity in males. This hypothesis is the subject of several clinical trials of anti-androgen therapies around the world. Here, we investigated the sex-associated TMPRSS2 and ACE2 expression in human and mouse lungs and interrogated the possibility of pharmacologic modification of their expression with anti-androgens. We found no evidence for increased TMPRSS2 expression in the lungs of males compared to females in humans or mice. Furthermore, in male mice, treatment with the androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide did not decrease pulmonary TMPRSS2. On the other hand, ACE2 and AR expression was sexually dimorphic and higher in males than females. ACE2 was moderately suppressible with enzalutamide administration. Our work suggests that sex differences in COVID-19 outcomes attributable to viral entry are independent of TMPRSS2. Modest changes in ACE2 could account for some of the sex discordance.


Subject(s)
Angiogenesis Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Receptors, Androgen/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Androgen Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Androgens , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Benzamides/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Nitriles/pharmacology , Phenylthiohydantoin/pharmacology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Smokers
18.
Cell ; 184(11): 2797-2801, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241746

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted structural inequalities and racism promoting health disparities among communities of color. Taking cardiovascular disease as an example, we provide a framework for multidisciplinary efforts leveraging translational and epidemiologic approaches to decode the biological impacts of inequalities and racism and develop targeted interventions that promote health equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Equity , Health Promotion/methods , Racism , Stress, Physiological/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/psychology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/physiology , Humans , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/immunology , Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiology , Racism/psychology , Risk Factors , Sympathetic Nervous System/immunology , Sympathetic Nervous System/physiology
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236794

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) afflicts approximately 200,000 patients annually and has a 40% mortality rate. The COVID-19 pandemic has massively increased the rate of ALI incidence. The pathogenesis of ALI involves tissue damage from invading microbes and, in severe cases, the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). This study aimed to develop a therapy to normalize the excess production of inflammatory cytokines and promote tissue repair in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Based on our previous studies, we tested the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and BTP-2 therapies. IGF-I was selected, because we and others have shown that elevated inflammatory cytokines suppress the expression of growth hormone receptors in the liver, leading to a decrease in the circulating IGF-I. IGF-I is a growth factor that increases vascular protection, enhances tissue repair, and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is also required to produce anti-inflammatory 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. BTP-2, an inhibitor of cytosolic calcium, was used to suppress the LPS-induced increase in cytosolic calcium, which otherwise leads to an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. We showed that LPS increased the expression of the primary inflammatory mediators such as toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), IL-1ß, interleukin-17 (IL-17), TNF-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which were normalized by the IGF-I + BTP-2 dual therapy in the lungs, along with improved vascular gene expression markers. The histologic lung injury score was markedly elevated by LPS and reduced to normal by the combination therapy. In conclusion, the LPS-induced increases in inflammatory cytokines, vascular injuries, and lung injuries were all improved by IGF-I + BTP-2 combination therapy.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Anilides/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/pharmacology , Thiadiazoles/pharmacology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Anilides/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Calcium/metabolism , Calcium Channels/metabolism , Cytokines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Immunohistochemistry , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/therapeutic use , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/genetics , Thiadiazoles/therapeutic use , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234744

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was associated with multiple organ failure and comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Risk factors, such as age, gender, and obesity, were associated with COVID-19 infection. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is known to use several host receptors for viral entry, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) in the lung and other organs. However, ACE2 could be shed from the surface to be soluble ACE2 (sACE2) in the circulation. The epigenetic factors affecting ACE2 expression include a type of small non-coding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs). In this study, we aimed at exploring the status of the sACE2 as well as serum levels of several upstream novel miRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers that might have a potential role in T2DM patients. Serum samples were collected from 50 T2DM patients and 50 healthy controls, and sACE2 levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Also, RNA was extracted, and TaqMan miRNA reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to measure serum miRNA levels. Our results revealed that sACE2 is decreased in the T2DM patients and is affected by age, gender, and obesity level. Additionally, 4 miRNAs, which are revealed by in silico analysis to be potentially upstream of ACE2 were detectable in the serum. Among them, miR-421 level was found to be decreased in the serum of diabetic patients, regardless of the presence or absence of diabetic complications, as well as being differential in various body mass index (BMI) groups. The other 3 miRNAs (miR-3909, miR-212-5p, and miR-4677-3p) showed associations with multiple factors including age, gender, BMI, and serum markers, in addition to being correlated to each other. In conclusion, our study reveals a decline in the circulating serum levels of sACE2 in T2DM patients and identified 4 novel miRNAs that were associated with T2DM, which are influenced by different clinical and demographic factors.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , Diabetes Complications/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , MicroRNAs/blood , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biomarkers/blood , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Complications/genetics , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Down-Regulation , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Male , MicroRNAs/genetics , Middle Aged , Obesity/blood , Obesity/genetics
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