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1.
Cytokine ; 154: 155889, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797004

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerged coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2). Disease severity is associated with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). Genetic polymorphisms in the regulatory regions of cytokine genes may be associated with differential cytokine production in COVID-19 patients. This study aimed to investigate the association between three potentially functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of IL-6 and the severity of susceptibility to COVID-19 in an Iranian population. METHODS: In total, 346 individuals (175 patients with severe COVID-19 and 171 patients with mild COVID-19) were recruited for this cohort study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of patients to determine the genotypes of three selected SNPs (rs1800795 (-174 G > C), rs1800796 (-572 G > C), and rs1800797 (-597 G > A)) in the promoter region of the IL-6 gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the genotype or allele distribution of selected SNPs (rs1800795 (-174 G > C), rs1800796 (-572 G > C), and rs1800797 (-597 G > A)) in the promoter region of the IL-6 gene in patients with severe COVID-19 and patients with mild COVID-19. DISCUSSION: Our study indicated that these SNPs are not associated with COVID-19 severity in the Kurdish population from Kermanshah, Iran.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-6 , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Cytokines/genetics , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Iran/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Egypt J Immunol ; 29(2): 1-9, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1790704

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the causative agent of coronavirus disease started in 2019 (COVID-19). IL-6 gene is located on chromosome 7. A considerable number of polymorphisms was identified in the IL-6 gene. Polymorphism in IL-6-174C allele is associated with a higher level of IL-6 production and this may lead to severity of in COVID-19 patients. We intended to investigate the role of polymorphism in the promotor region of IL-6 gene as a predictor for disease severity in COVID-19 patients. Fifty patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and classified into moderate and severe groups and twenty apparently healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping for IL-6 gene (-174G/C) was done by using TaqMan SNP genotyping assay for all studied groups. The distribution of different IL-6-174G/C genotypes among COVID-19 patients was 76% for GG genotype, 22% for GC genotype and 2% for CC genotype. Whereas the distribution of genotypes among the control group was 80% for GG genotype, 20% for GC genotype and 0.0% for CC genotype. The G allele distribution was 87% and 90% in the patients and control groups, respectively, while the C allele was 13% and 10% in the patients and control groups, respectively. There was no significant statistical association between different genotypes, severity and treatment outcome in the patients group. In conclusion, this study showed no relation between -174G/C IL-6 gene polymorphism and disease, in COVID-19 patients. Keywords: Interleukin-6, Promotor region, Polymorphism, COVID-19, Severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin-6 , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Clin Immunol ; 238: 108990, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773179

ABSTRACT

HLA is a polymorphic antigen presenter which has provided valuable information on the susceptibility of populations to viruses. Therefore, the study of HLA can reveal specific susceptibility or resistance alleles to severe COVID-19 in an ethnically dependent manner. This pilot study investigated HLA alleles associated with COVID-19 severity in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico. A total of 146 Mexican Mestizos were typed for HLA class I and II using PCR-SSP. The patients were classified according to the outcome (death or improvement) and the infection's severity (mild or severe). In addition, a group of exposed uninfected individuals was included. HLA-A*68 was found to be a protective allele against the severe infection and fatal outcome; pC = 0.03, OR = 0.4, 95% CI =0.20-0.86, and pC =0.009, OR = 0.3, 95% CI =0.13-0.71 respectively. HLA-DRB1*03 also appears to be a protective factor against fatal outcome pC = 0.009, OR = 0.1, 95%IC = 0.01-0.66; however, the low frequency of this allele in the studied population limits the statistical power. The severity and fatal outcome of COVID-19 patients in Tapachula, Chiapas depend more on the lack of resistance than susceptibility HLA alleles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HLA-A Antigens , Alleles , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA-A Antigens/genetics , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Pilot Projects
4.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 18(2): e1009726, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753172

ABSTRACT

The massive assessment of immune evasion due to viral mutations that increase COVID-19 susceptibility can be computationally facilitated. The adaptive cytotoxic T response is critical during primary infection and the generation of long-term protection. Here, potential HLA class I epitopes in the SARS-CoV-2 proteome were predicted for 2,915 human alleles of 71 families using the netMHCIpan EL algorithm. Allele families showed extreme epitopic differences, underscoring genetic variability of protective capacity between humans. Up to 1,222 epitopes were associated with any of the twelve supertypes, that is, allele clusters covering 90% population. Next, from all mutations identified in ~118,000 viral NCBI isolates, those causing significant epitope score reduction were considered epitope escape mutations. These mutations mainly involved non-conservative substitutions at the second and C-terminal position of the ligand core, or total ligand removal by large recurrent deletions. Escape mutations affected 47% of supertype epitopes, which in 21% of cases concerned isolates from two or more sub-continental areas. Some of these changes were coupled, but never surpassed 15% of evaded epitopes for the same supertype in the same isolate, except for B27. In contrast to most supertypes, eight allele families mostly contained alleles with few SARS-CoV-2 ligands. Isolates harboring cytotoxic escape mutations for these families co-existed geographically within sub-Saharan and Asian populations enriched in these alleles according to the Allele Frequency Net Database. Collectively, our findings indicate that escape mutation events have already occurred for half of HLA class I supertype epitopes. However, it is presently unlikely that, overall, it poses a threat to the global population. In contrast, single and double mutations for susceptible alleles may be associated with viral selective pressure and alarming local outbreaks. The integration of genomic, geographical and immunoinformatic information eases the surveillance of variants potentially affecting the global population, as well as minority subpopulations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genome, Viral , Immune Evasion , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Frequency , Genome, Viral/genetics , Genome, Viral/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Immune Evasion/immunology , Mutation/genetics , Mutation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology
5.
Hum Immunol ; 83(6): 521-527, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739765

ABSTRACT

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecules are proposed to influence susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A case-control study was conducted on 209 patients with COVID-19 and198 controls to assess soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels and HLA-G 14-bp insertion [Ins]/deletion [Del] polymorphism. Results revealed that median levels of sHLA-G were significantly higher in serum of COVID-19 patients than in controls (17.92 [interquartile range: 14.86-21.15] vs. 13.42 [9.95-17.38] ng/mL; probability <0.001). sHLA-G levels showed no significant differences between patients with moderate, severe or critical disease. Del allele was significantly associated with the risk of COVID-19 (odds ratio = 1.89; 95% confidence interval = 1.44-2.48; corrected probability = 0.001), while a higher risk was associated with Del/Del genotype (odds ratio = 2.39; 95% confidence interval = 1.25-4.58; corrected probability = 0.048). Allele and genotype frequencies of HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism stratified by gender or disease severity showed no significant differences in each stratum. Further, there was no significant impact of genotypes on sHLA-G levels. In conclusion, sHLA-G levels were up-regulated in COVID-19 patients regardless of disease severity. Further, it is suggested that HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism is associated with COVID-19 risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HLA-G Antigens , INDEL Mutation , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , HLA-G Antigens/genetics , Humans , Iraq
6.
Hum Immunol ; 83(1): 1-9, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719801

ABSTRACT

The class I and class II Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) are an integral part of the host adaptive immune system against viral infections. The characterization of HLA allele frequency in the population can play an important role in determining whether HLA antigens contribute to viral susceptibility. In this regard, global efforts are currently underway to study possible correlations between HLA alleles with the occurrence and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Specifically, this study examined the possible association between specific HLA alleles and susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 in a population from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The frequencies of HLA class I (HLA-A, -B, and -C) and HLA class II alleles (HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1); defined using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS); from 115 UAE nationals with mild, moderate, and severe SARS-CoV-2 infection are presented here. HLA alleles and supertypes were compared between hospitalized and non-hospitalized subjects. Statistical significance was observed between certain HLA alleles and supertypes and the severity of the infection. Specifically, alleles HLA-B*51:01 and HLA-A*26:01 showed a negative association (suggestive of protection), whilst genotypes HLA-A*03:01, HLA-DRB1*15:01, and supertype B44 showed a positive association (suggestive of predisposition) to COVID-19 severity. The results support the potential use of HLA testing to differentiate between patients who require specific clinical management strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , HLA Antigens/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA Antigens/immunology , Haplotypes , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , United Arab Emirates , Young Adult
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715409

ABSTRACT

We propose a new hypothesis that explains the maintenance and evolution of MHC polymorphism. It is based on two phenomena: the constitution of the repertoire of naive T lymphocytes and the evolution of the pathogen and its impact on the immune memory of T lymphocytes. Concerning the latter, pathogen evolution will have a different impact on reinfection depending on the MHC allomorph. If a mutation occurs in a given region, in the case of MHC allotypes, which do not recognize the peptide in this region, the mutation will have no impact on the memory repertoire. In the case where the MHC allomorph binds to the ancestral peptides and not to the mutated peptide, that individual will have a higher chance of being reinfected. This difference in fitness will lead to a variation of the allele frequency in the next generation. Data from the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic already support a significant part of this hypothesis and following up on these data may enable it to be confirmed. This hypothesis could explain why some individuals after vaccination respond less well than others to variants and leads to predict the probability of reinfection after a first infection depending upon the variant and the HLA allomorph.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , HLA Antigens/immunology , Polymorphism, Genetic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Frequency , HLA Antigens/genetics , HLA Antigens/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Mutation/genetics , Mutation/immunology , Pandemics , Peptides/immunology , Peptides/metabolism , Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
8.
Front Immunol ; 13: 769900, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705660

ABSTRACT

The novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection has become a global health concern, causing the COVID-19 pandemic. The disease symptoms and outcomes depend on the host immunity, in which the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules play a distinct role. The HLA alleles have an inter-population variability, and understanding their link to the COVID-19 in an ethnically distinct population may contribute to personalized medicine. The present study aimed at detecting associations between common HLA alleles and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity in Armenians. In 299 COVID-19 patients (75 asymptomatic, 102 mild/moderate, 122 severe), the association between disease severity and classic HLA-I and II loci was examined. We found that the advanced age, male sex of patients, and sex and age interaction significantly contributed to the severity of the disease. We observed that an age-dependent effect of HLA-B*51:01 carriage [odds ratio (OR)=0.48 (0.28-0.80), Pbonf <0.036] is protective against severe COVID-19. Contrary, the HLA-C*04:01 allele, in a dose-dependent manner, was associated with a significant increase in the disease severity [OR (95% CI) =1.73 (1.20-2.49), Pbonf <0.021] and an advancing age (P<0.013). The link between HLA-C*04:01 and age was secondary to a stronger association between HLA-C*04:01 and disease severity. However, HLA-C*04:01 exerted a sex-dependent differential distribution between clinical subgroups [females: P<0.0012; males: P=0.48]. The comparison of HLA-C*04:01 frequency between subgroups and 2,781 Armenian controls revealed a significant incidence of HLA-C*04:01 deficiency in asymptomatic COVID-19. HLA-C*04:01 homozygous genotype in patients blueprinted a decrease in heterozygosity of HLA-B and HLA class-I loci. In HLA-C*04:01 carriers, these changes translated to the SARS-CoV-2 peptide presentation predicted inefficacy by HLA-C and HLA class-I molecules, simultaneously enhancing the appropriate HLA-B potency. In patients with clinical manifestation, due to the high prevalence of HLA-C*04:01, these effects provided a decrease of the HLA class-I heterozygosity and an ability to recognize SARS-CoV-2 peptides. Based on our observations, we developed a prediction model involving demographic variables and HLA-C*04:01 allele for the identification of potential cases with the risk of hospitalization (the area under the curve (AUC) = 86.2%) or severe COVID-19 (AUC =71%).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , HLA-B51 Antigen/genetics , HLA-C Antigens/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Age Factors , Armenia , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , HLA-B51 Antigen/immunology , HLA-C Antigens/immunology , Heterozygote , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk , Sex Factors , Viral Proteins/immunology
9.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264009, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Populations seem to respond differently to the global pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Recent studies show individual variability in both susceptibility and clinical response to COVID-19 infection. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitute one of COVID-19 risk groups, being already associated with a poor prognosis upon infection. This study aims contributing to unveil the underlying reasons for such prognosis in people with COPD and the variability in the response observed across worldwide populations, by looking at the genetic background as a possible answer to COVID-19 infection response heterogeneity. METHODS: SNPs already associated with susceptibility to COVID-19 infection (rs286914 and rs12329760) and severe COVID-19 with respiratory failure (rs657152 and rs11385942) were assessed and their allelic frequencies used to calculate the probability of having multiple risk alleles. This was performed on a Portuguese case-control COPD cohort, previously clinically characterized and genotyped from saliva samples, and also on worldwide populations (European, Spanish, Italian, African, American and Asian), using publicly available frequencies data. A polygenic risk analysis was also conducted on the Portuguese COPD cohort for the two mentioned phenotypes, and also for hospitalization and survival to COVID-19 infection. FINDINGS: No differences in genetic risk for COVID-19 susceptibility, hospitalization, severity or survival were found between people with COPD and the control group (all p-values > 0.01), either considering risk alleles individually, allelic combinations or polygenic risk scores. All populations, even those with European ancestry (Portuguese, Spanish and Italian), showed significant differences from the European population in genetic risk for both COVID-19 susceptibility and severity (all p-values < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate a low genetic contribution for COVID-19 infection predisposition or worse outcomes observed in people with COPD. Also, our study unveiled a high genetic heterogeneity across major world populations for the same alleles, even within European sub-populations, demonstrating the need to build a higher resolution European genetic map, so that differences in the distribution of relevant alleles can be easily accessed and used to better manage diseases, ultimately, safeguarding populations with higher genetic predisposition to such diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Aged , Alleles , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Portugal , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , /genetics
10.
Curr Res Transl Med ; 70(2): 103333, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The human protein transmembrane protease serine type 2 (TMPRSS2) plays a key role in SARS-CoV-2 infection, as it is required to activate the virus' spike protein, facilitating entry into target cells. We hypothesized that naturally-occurring TMPRSS2 human genetic variants affecting the structure and function of the TMPRSS2 protein may modulate the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We focused on the only common TMPRSS2 non-synonymous variant predicted to be damaging (rs12329760 C>T, p.V160M), which has a minor allele frequency ranging from 0.14 in Ashkenazi Jewish to 0.38 in East Asians. We analysed the association between the rs12329760 and COVID-19 severity in 2,244 critically ill patients with COVID-19 from 208 UK intensive care units recruited as part of the GenOMICC (Genetics Of Mortality In Critical Care) study. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for sex, age and deprivation index. For in vitro studies, HEK293 cells were co-transfected with ACE2 and either TMPRSS2 wild type or mutant (TMPRSS2V160M). A SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus entry assay was used to investigate the ability of TMPRSS2V160M to promote viral entry. RESULTS: We show that the T allele of rs12329760 is associated with a reduced likelihood of developing severe COVID-19 (OR 0.87, 95%CI:0.79-0.97, p = 0.01). This association was stronger in homozygous individuals when compared to the general population (OR 0.65, 95%CI:0.50-0.84, p = 1.3 × 10-3). We demonstrate in vitro that this variant, which causes the amino acid substitution valine to methionine, affects the catalytic activity of TMPRSS2 and is less able to support SARS-CoV-2 spike-mediated entry into cells. CONCLUSION: TMPRSS2 rs12329760 is a common variant associated with a significantly decreased risk of severe COVID-19. Further studies are needed to assess the expression of TMPRSS2 across different age groups. Moreover, our results identify TMPRSS2 as a promising drug target, with a potential role for camostat mesilate, a drug approved for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and postoperative reflux esophagitis, in the treatment of COVID-19. Clinical trials are needed to confirm this.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Frequency , HEK293 Cells , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization
11.
Cytokine ; 143: 155525, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1628419

ABSTRACT

Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is a crucial cytokine in host immune response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study aimed to determine whether a functional polymorphism +874T/A in IFN-γ gene linked to high and low producer phenotypes [IFN-γ (+874Thigh â†’ Alow)] may alter the outcomes of chronic HBV infection in Tunisian population. The +874T/A was analysed by ARMS-PCR method in the group of 200 patients chronically infected with HBV and 200 healthy controls. We observed that minor +874A allele, minor +874AA and +874TA genotypes were significantly more frequent in the chronic hepatitis B group in comparison to the control group [49 vs. 31%, P < 10-4; 24 vs. 13%, P < 10-4; 52 vs. 38%, P < 10-4; respectively]. Besides, they were associated with susceptibility to hepatitis B infection [OR = 2.15, 3.87 and 2.84, respectively]. The minor +874A allele and +874AA genotype were statistically more representative in the sub-group of patients with high viral DNA load when compared with the sub-group of patients with low HBV DNA load [(57% vs. 43%, P = 0.003, OR = 1.79); (33% vs. 14%, P = 0.003, OR = 3.59), respectively]. Collectively, our study suggests an association between the IFN-γ +874T/A SNP and persistence of HBV by the enhancement of HBV DNA replication.


Subject(s)
DNA Replication , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hepatitis B virus/physiology , Hepatitis B, Chronic/genetics , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology , Adult , Alleles , Case-Control Studies , DNA, Viral/genetics , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Hepatitis B, Chronic/virology , Humans , Male , Viral Load/genetics
12.
Clin Immunol ; 235: 108929, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629722

ABSTRACT

Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 genes are involved in the host immune response against viral infections including SARS-COV-2. This study aimed to investigate the association between the TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) polymorphisms with the prognosis and susceptibility to COVID-19 pneumonia accompanying SARS-COV-2 infection. This case-control study included 236 individuals: 136 COVID-19 pneumonia patients and 100 age and sex-matched controls. Two polymorphisms (TLR3 rs3775290 and TLR7 rs179008) were genotyped by allelic discrimination through TaqMan real-time PCR. This study also investigated predictors of mortality in COVID-19 pneumonia through logistic regression. The mutant 'T/T' genotypes and the 'T' alleles of TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) polymorphisms were significantly associated with increased risk of COVID-19 pneumonia. This study did not report association between the mutant 'T/T' genotypes of TLR3(rs3775290) and TLR7(rs179008) and the disease outcome. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of mortality in COVID-19 pneumonia were male sex, SPO2 ≤ 82%, INR > 1, LDH ≥ 1000 U/l, and lymphocyte count<900/mm3 (P < 0.05).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Pneumonia/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 7/genetics , Aged , Alleles , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pneumonia/virology , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
HLA ; 99(3): 183-191, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621962

ABSTRACT

The polymorphism of the HLA system has been extensively studied in COVID-19 infection, however there are no data about the role of HLA on vaccine response. We report here the HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 allelic frequencies of n = 111 individuals after BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine, selected on the basis of lower antibody levels (<5% percentile) after the second dose among a total of n = 2569 vaccinees, and compare them with the frequencies of a reference population. We found that differences in the frequencies of the alleles HLA-A*03:01, A*33:03, B*58:01 and at least one haplotype (HLA-A*24:02~C*07:01~B*18:01~DRB1*11:04) are associated with a weaker antibody response after vaccination, together with the age of vaccinees. Our results might suggest a role played by some HLA alleles or haplotypes in antibody production after the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine, giving insights into the tracking of potentially susceptible individuals across populations. Further studies are needed to better define our exploratory findings and dissect the role of HLA polymorphism on response to anti-COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation , COVID-19 , HLA-DRB1 Chains , Alleles , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Gene Frequency , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , Haplotypes , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
14.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(17): e102, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594917

ABSTRACT

Rapidly evolving RNA viruses continuously produce minority haplotypes that can become dominant if they are drug-resistant or can better evade the immune system. Therefore, early detection and identification of minority viral haplotypes may help to promptly adjust the patient's treatment plan preventing potential disease complications. Minority haplotypes can be identified using next-generation sequencing, but sequencing noise hinders accurate identification. The elimination of sequencing noise is a non-trivial task that still remains open. Here we propose CliqueSNV based on extracting pairs of statistically linked mutations from noisy reads. This effectively reduces sequencing noise and enables identifying minority haplotypes with the frequency below the sequencing error rate. We comparatively assess the performance of CliqueSNV using an in vitro mixture of nine haplotypes that were derived from the mutation profile of an existing HIV patient. We show that CliqueSNV can accurately assemble viral haplotypes with frequencies as low as 0.1% and maintains consistent performance across short and long bases sequencing platforms.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Computational Biology/methods , Haplotypes , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , RNA Virus Infections/diagnosis , RNA Viruses/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Gene Frequency , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/virology , HIV-1/genetics , Humans , Mutation , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , RNA Virus Infections/virology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity
15.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001510, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592147

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects a broader range of mammalian species than previously predicted, binding a diversity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) orthologs despite extensive sequence divergence. Within this sequence degeneracy, we identify a rare sequence combination capable of conferring SARS-CoV-2 resistance. We demonstrate that this sequence was likely unattainable during human evolution due to deleterious effects on ACE2 carboxypeptidase activity, which has vasodilatory and cardioprotective functions in vivo. Across the 25 ACE2 sites implicated in viral binding, we identify 6 amino acid substitutions unique to mouse-one of the only known mammalian species resistant to SARS-CoV-2. Substituting human variants at these positions is sufficient to confer binding of the SARS-CoV-2 S protein to mouse ACE2, facilitating cellular infection. Conversely, substituting mouse variants into either human or dog ACE2 abolishes viral binding, diminishing cellular infection. However, these same substitutions decrease human ACE2 activity by 50% and are predicted as pathogenic, consistent with the extreme rarity of human polymorphisms at these sites. This trade-off can be avoided, however, depending on genetic background; if substituted simultaneously, these same mutations have no deleterious effect on dog ACE2 nor that of the rodent ancestor estimated to exist 70 million years ago. This genetic contingency (epistasis) may have therefore opened the road to resistance for some species, while making humans susceptible to viruses that use these ACE2 surfaces for binding, as does SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Disease Resistance/genetics , Epistasis, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acids , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Dogs , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Frequency , Humans , Hydrolysis , Mice , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment
16.
Clin Immunol ; 234: 108911, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588089

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role against viruses. NK cells express killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) which regulate their activity and function. The polymorphisms in KIR haplotypes confer differential viral susceptibility and disease severity caused by infections. We investigated the association between KIR genes and COVID-19 disease severity. METHODS: 424 COVID-19 positive patients were divided according to their disease severity into mild, moderate and severe. KIR genes were genotyped using next generation sequencing (NGS). Association between KIR genes and COVID-19 disease severity was conducted and significant correlations were reported. RESULTS: In the COVID-19 patients, KIR Bx genotype was more common than AA genotype. The Bx genotype was found more frequently in patients with mild disease, while in severe disease the AA genotype was more common than the Bx genotype. The KIR2DS4 gene carried the highest risk for severe COVID-19 infection (OR 8.48, pc= 0.0084) followed by KIR3DL1 (OR 7.61, pc= 0.0192). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that KIR2DS4 and KIR3DL1 genes carry risk for severe COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics , Receptors, KIR/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/metabolism , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genotype , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
17.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some studies revealed that despite having sufficient sun exposure and dietary supply, the level of serum 25(OH)D in Bangladeshi adults is lower than its normal range. Genetic pattern of an individual is also an essential factor that regulates the level of serum 25(OH)D. However, the genetic variations of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) and their association with low serum 25(OH)D level in Bangladeshi adults are yet to be explored. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the frequency of variants of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 gene and its association with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults. METHOD: This pilot study was conducted among thirty individuals with low serum 25(OH)D level as the study population and ten subjects with sufficient serum 25(OH)D level as controls based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Genetic analysis of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 including primer designing, DNA extraction, PCR of target region with purification and Sanger sequencing of the PCR products were done accordingly. For statistical analysis, One-way ANOVA followed by LSD test, Freeman-Halton extension of Fisher's exact test, Chi-square test (χ2) test and unpaired student t-test were performed. RESULTS: In this study, genetic variants of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) among the study population were genotype GG (63.30%), GA (30%) and AA (6.7%). Minor allele frequency of the study population was 0.217. The association between GG and GA genotypes of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) with low serum 25(OH)D level among the study population was found and it was statistically significant. Statistically significant differences were also observed between the genotypes and alleles of the study population and controls. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of 'GG' and 'GA' genotypes of rs1041657 in CYP2R1 gene is associated with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults in this pilot study.


Subject(s)
/genetics , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Cytochrome P450 Family 2/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Alleles , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Testing/methods , Genotype , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Vitamin D/blood
18.
J Clin Invest ; 131(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546628

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThere is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes among younger adults, and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition.MethodsWe combined individual level data from 13,888 COVID-19 patients (n = 7185 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in 9 countries to assess the association of the major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor (chromosome 3 locus tagged by rs10490770) with mortality, COVID-19-related complications, and laboratory values. We next performed metaanalyses using FinnGen and the Columbia University COVID-19 Biobank.ResultsWe found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6), venous thromboembolism (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), and hepatic injury (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0). Risk allele carriers age 60 years and younger had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.8-3.9) compared with those of more than 60 years (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8; interaction, P = 0.038). Among individuals 60 years and younger who died or experienced severe respiratory failure, 32.3% were risk-variant carriers compared with 13.9% of those not experiencing these outcomes. This risk variant improved the prediction of death or severe respiratory failure similarly to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors.ConclusionsThe major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, which are more pronounced among individuals 60 years or younger. The effect was similar in magnitude and more common than most established clinical risk factors, suggesting potential implications for future clinical risk management.


Subject(s)
Alleles , COVID-19 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Loci , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
19.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 88-98, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544348

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) occurred in late 2019 and quickly spread all over the world. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) belongs to a genetically diverse group that mutates continuously leading to the emergence of multiple variants. Although a few antiviral agents and anti-inflammatory medicines are available, thousands of individuals have passed away due to emergence of new viral variants. Thus, proper surveillance of the SARS-CoV-2 genome is needed for the rapid identification of developing mutations over time, which are of the major concern if they occur specifically in the surface spike proteins of the virus (neutralizing analyte). This article reviews the potential mutations acquired by the SARS-CoV2 since the pandemic began and their significant impact on the neutralizing efficiency of vaccines and validity of the diagnostic assays.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genetic Drift , Genome, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
20.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(11)2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533885

ABSTRACT

Host genomic information, specifically genomic variations, may characterize susceptibility to disease and identify people with a higher risk of harm, leading to better targeting of care and vaccination. Italy was the epicentre for the spread of COVID-19 in Europe, the first country to go into a national lockdown and has one of the highest COVID-19 associated mortality rates. Qatar, on the other hand has a very low mortality rate. In this study, we compared whole-genome sequencing data of 14398 adults and Qatari-national to 925 Italian individuals. We also included in the comparison whole-exome sequence data from 189 Italian laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases. We focused our study on a curated list of 3619 candidate genes involved in innate immunity and host-pathogen interaction. Two population-gene metric scores, the Delta Singleton-Cohort variant score (DSC) and Sum Singleton-Cohort variant score (SSC), were applied to estimate the presence of selective constraints in the Qatari population and in the Italian cohorts. Results based on DSC and SSC metrics demonstrated a different selective pressure on three genes (MUC5AC, ABCA7, FLNA) between Qatari and Italian populations. This study highlighted the genetic differences between Qatari and Italian populations and identified a subset of genes involved in innate immunity and host-pathogen interaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Adult , Alleles , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Exome/genetics , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology , Genetics, Population , Genomics/methods , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Whole Exome Sequencing/methods , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods
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