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1.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248387, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573672

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study aims to investigate GPs' experiences of how UK COVID-19 policies have affected the management and safety of complex elderly patients, who suffer from multimorbidity, at the primary care level in North West London (NWL). DESIGN: This is a service evaluation adopting a qualitative approach. SETTING: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted between 6 and 22 May 2020, 2 months after the introduction of the UK COVID-19 Action Plan, allowing GPs to adapt to the new changes and reflect on their impact. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen GPs working in NWL were interviewed, until data saturation was reached. OUTCOME MEASURES: The impact of COVID-19 policies on the management and safety of complex elderly patients in primary care from the GPs' perspective. RESULTS: Participants' average experience was fourteen years working in primary care for the NHS. They stated that COVID-19 policies have affected primary care at three levels, patients' behaviour, work conditions, and clinical practice. GPs reflected on the impact through five major themes; four of which have been adapted from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) framework, changes in primary care (at the three levels mentioned above), involvement of GPs in policy making, communication and coordination (with patients and in between medical teams), stressors and worries; in addition to a fifth theme to conclude the GPs' suggestions for improvement (either proposed mitigation strategies, or existing actions that showed relative success). A participant used an expression of "infodemic" to describe the GPs' everyday pressure of receiving new policy updates with their subsequent changes in practice. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all levels of the health system in the UK, particularly primary care. Based on the GPs' perspective in NWL, changes to practice have offered opportunities to maintain safe healthcare as well as possible drawbacks that should be of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Practitioners/psychology , Patient Safety , Primary Health Care , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Health Policy , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , Policy Making , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Kingdom/epidemiology
2.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 277-285, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Responsibility of general practitioners (GPs) in delivering safe and effective care is always high but during the COVID-19 pandemic they face even growing pressure that might result in unbearable stress load (allostatic overload, AO) leading to disease. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to measure AO of Hungarian GPs during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore their recreational resources to identify potential protective factors against stress load. METHODS: In a mixed-method design, Fava's clinimetric approach to AO was applied alongside the Psychosocial Index (PSI); Kellner's symptom questionnaire (SQ) to measure depression, anxiety, hostility and somatisation and the Public Health Surveillance Well-being Scale (PHS-WB) to determine mental, social, and physical well-being. Recreational resources were mapped. Besides Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests, regression analysis was applied to identify explanatory variables of AO. RESULTS: Data of 228 GPs (68% females) were analysed. Work-related changes caused the biggest challenges leading to AO in 60% of the sample. While female sex (OR: 1.99; CI: 1.06; 3.74, p = 0.032) and other life stresses (OR: 1.4; CI: 1.2; 1.6, p < 0.001) associated with increased odds of AO, each additional day with 30 min for recreation purposes associated with 20% decreased odds (OR: 0.838; CI: 0.72; 0.97, p = 0.020). 3-4 days a week when time was ensured for recreation associated with elevated mental and physical well-being, while 5-7 days associated with lower depressive and anxiety symptoms, somatisation, and hostility. CONCLUSION: Under changing circumstances, resilience improvement through increasing time spent on recreation should be emphasised to prevent GPs from the adverse health consequences of stress load.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hungary , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Recreation , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Prim Health Care ; 13(2): 102-105, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462063

ABSTRACT

Vulnerability during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an emotional state that affects all of us globally. The Italian experience shows that our general practitioners (GPs) seem to have a higher rate of death due to COVID-19 infection than other physicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure , Risk
4.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 176-183, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328901

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After the 'first wave' in spring 2020, opinions regarding the threat and measures against COVID-19 seemed to vary among German general practitioners (GPs). OBJECTIVES: To systematically investigate opinions and to identify subgroups of GPs sharing similar views. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all 210 practices accredited for undergraduate teaching of family medicine at the Medical Faculty of the Technical University of Munich. Questions addressed personal opinions regarding risks, dilemmas, restrictions and their relaxation associated with COVID-19, and personal fears, symptoms of depression and anxiety. Patterns of strong opinions ('archetypes') were identified using archetypal analysis, a statistical method seeking extremal points in the multidimensional data. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-one GPs sent back a questionnaire (response rate 77%); 143 (68%) with complete data for all 38 relevant variables could be included in the analysis. We identified four archetypes with subgroups of GPs tending in the direction of these archetypes: a small group of 'Sceptics' (n = 12/8%) considering threats of COVID-19 as overrated and measures taken as exaggerated; 'Hardliners' (n = 34/24%) considering threats high and supporting strong measures; 'Balancers' (n = 77/54%) who also rated the threats high but were more critical about potentially impairing the quality of life of elderly people and children; and 'Anxious' GPs (n = 20/14%) tending to report more fear, depressive and anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Among the participants in this survey, opinions regarding the threat and the measures taken against COVID-19 during the 'first wave' in Germany in spring 2020 varied greatly.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , General Practitioners , Public Policy , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , Germany , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
5.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254056, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic is posing major challenges for health care systems. In Germany, one such challenge has been that adequate palliative care for the severely ill and dying (with and without COVID-19), as well as their loved ones, has not been available at all times and in all settings., the pandemic has underlined the significance of the contribution of general practitioners (GPs) to the care of severely ill and dying patients. OBJECTIVES: To describe GPs' experiences, challenges and perspectives with respect to end-of-life care during the first peak of the pandemic (spring 2020) in Germany. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In November and December 2020, a link to an Unipark online survey was sent to GPs registered on nationwide distribution lists. RESULTS: In total, 410 GPs responded; 61.5% indicated that the quality of their patients' end-of-life care was maintained throughout the pandemic, 36.8% reported a decrease in quality compared to pre-pandemic times. Of the GPs who made home visits to severely ill and dying patients, 61.4% reported a stable number of visits, 28.5% reported fewer visits. 62.7% of the GPs reported increased telephone contact and reduced personal contact with patients; 36.1% offered video consultations in lieu of face-to-face contact. The GPs reported that relatives were restricted (48.5%) or prohibited from visiting (33.4%) patients in nursing homes. They observed a fear of loneliness among patients in nursing homes (91.9%), private homes (87.3%) and hospitals (86.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The present work provides insights into the pandemic management of GPs and supports the development of a national strategy for palliative care during a pandemic. To effectively address end-of-life care, GPs and palliative care specialists should be involved in COVID-19 task forces on micro, meso and macro levels of health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners , Terminal Care/methods , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , General Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/psychology , Palliative Care/trends , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Terminal Care/statistics & numerical data
6.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254960, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315895

ABSTRACT

According to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic, medical teleconsultations using various technologies have become an important tool to mediate communication between general practitioners (GP) and the patients in primary health care in many countries. The quality of the GP-patient communication is an essential factor, which improves the results of treatment and patient satisfaction. The objective of this paper is to study patients' satisfaction from teleconsultation in primary care and the impact of teleconsultations on GP-patient communication through the Covid-19 pandemic in Poland. We analyse whether the teleconsultations performed without physical examinations have a positive impact on GP-patient communication. The quality of teleconsultation and GP-patient communication have been measured using a questionnaire regarding the quality of medical care in a remote care conditions. Among 36 items, nine questions have been related to the dimension of GP-patient communication and ten to system experience. Our results suggest that the quality of teleconsultations is not inferior to the quality of consultation during a face-to-face visit. The patients indicated a high level of satisfaction regarding communication with their GP during teleconsultation. We have also identified that the technical quality and the sense of comfort during teleconsultation positively impact the communication quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physician-Patient Relations , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction , Poland
7.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 146, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, general practices were asked to expand triage and to reduce unnecessary face-to-face contact by prioritizing other consultation modes, e.g., online messaging, video, or telephone. The current study explores the potential barriers and facilitators general practitioners experienced to expanding triage systems and their attitudes towards triage during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A mixed-method study design was used in which a quantitative online survey was conducted along with qualitative interviews to gain a more nuanced appreciation for practitioners' experiences in the United Kingdom. The survey items were informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework so they would capture 14 behavioral factors that may influence whether practitioners use triage systems. Items were responded to using seven-point Likert scales. A median score was calculated for each item. The responses of participants identifying as part-owners and non-owners (i.e., "partner" vs. "non-partner" practitioners) were compared. The semi-structured interviews were conducted remotely and examined using Braun and Clark's thematic analysis. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 204 participants (66% Female). Most participants (83%) reported triaging patients. The items with the highest median scores captured the 'Knowledge,' 'Skills,' 'Social/Professional role and identity,' and 'Beliefs about capabilities' domains. The items with the lowest median scores captured the 'Beliefs about consequences,' 'Goals,' and 'Emotions' domains. For 14 of the 17 items, partner scores were higher than non-partner scores. All the qualitative interview participants relied on a phone triage system. Six broad themes were discovered: patient accessibility, confusions around what triage is, uncertainty and risk, relationships between service providers, job satisfaction, and the potential for total digital triage. Suggestions arose to optimize triage, such as ensuring there is sufficient time to conduct triage accurately and providing practical training to use triage efficiently. CONCLUSIONS: Many general practitioners are engaging with expanded triage systems, though more support is needed to achieve total triage across practices. Non-partner practitioners likely require more support to use the triage systems that practices take up. Additionally, practical support should be made available to help all practitioners manage the new risks and uncertainties they are likely to experience during non-face-to-face consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , General Practitioners , Remote Consultation , Triage , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence , England/epidemiology , Female , General Practice/organization & administration , General Practice/standards , General Practice/trends , General Practitioners/psychology , General Practitioners/standards , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Male , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/ethics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/ethics , Remote Consultation/methods , Risk Management/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/ethics , Triage/methods , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards
8.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253903, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During infectious disease outbreaks, healthcare workers are at high risk of infection, infecting others, and psychological distress. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of stress and anxiety in physicians during the COVID-19 outbreak in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region and assess their associated factors. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was carried out in Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan Region, from March 28 to April 15, 2020. An online self-administered survey questionnaire was used to collect data from physicians working in specialized COVID-19 centers and other healthcare facilities. The level of stress was measured based on the 10-items Perceived Stress Scale. The level of anxiety was measured based on the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale. RESULTS: A total of 370 participants responded to the perceived stress component of the survey, of whom 57 (15.4%) had low perceived stress, 249 (67.3%) had moderate stress, and 64 (17.3%) had high stress. Being female was significantly associated with having moderate/high stress (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.40 (95% CI 1.31-4.39)). A total of 201 participants responded to the generalized anxiety disorder component of the survey, of whom 19 (9.5%) had no anxiety, 57 (28.4%) had mild anxiety, 79 (39.3%) had moderate anxiety, and 46 (22.9%) had severe anxiety. Working in COVID-19 centers (AOR = 2.23 (95% CI 1.02-4.86)) and being general practitioners (AOR = 4.16 (95% CI 1.14-15.14)) were significantly associated with having moderate/severe anxiety. CONCLUSION: A considerable proportion of physicians experience stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 outbreak in Iraqi Kurdistan region. Generalists and those in special COVID-19 units report the greatest anxiety. There a need to establish mechanisms to reduce the risks of stress and anxiety among physicians. Mental health coping interventions through counseling should be based on COVID-19 protocol guidelines. Interventions should also emphasize physicians' ability to work safely and efficiently in providing care to the patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , Humans , Internet , Iraq/epidemiology , Male , Odds Ratio , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280630

ABSTRACT

Well-being is a major issue among health care professionals, especially physicians. Less job satisfaction and impaired health can have an impact on health care quality. Our aim was to examine the association of stressors (illegitimate tasks) and health related resources (work-related sense of coherence; recovery experience) with life satisfaction, happiness, job satisfaction and burnout among German general practitioners (GPs). We conducted a cross-sectional survey among general medical practices in Germany. Main outcome measures were life satisfaction, happiness (Subjective Happiness Scale), job satisfaction (Work Satisfaction Scale) and burnout (Copenhagen Burnout Inventory). 548 GPs from across Germany participated (53.6% males, 45.6% females; mostly representative of German GPs). One third (35.2%) of the participants reported a high prevalence of personal, and one quarter (26.5%) indicated a high prevalence of work-related burnout symptoms. Illegitimate tasks are negatively associated with life and job satisfaction and are positively associated with personal, work-related and patient-related burnout among GPs. Work-SoC and recovery experience are positively associated with life satisfaction, happiness, and job satisfaction and are negatively associated with personal, work-related and patient-related burnout. Female physicians have a higher job satisfaction than male physicians. Being female and working as an employed physician is associated with a higher prevalence of personal burnout symptoms. GPs working in a group practice are happier and more satisfied with their job than GPs in single practices. Personal, work-related and patient-related burnout symptoms are stronger in GPs working in a single practice than in GPs in group practices. Our results highlight that Work-SoC, recovery experience and illegitimate tasks are important for creating work-related well-being among GPs. Introducing health promotion activities which aim to strengthen recovery experience and Work-SoC, as well as interventions to restructure tasks, may increase life satisfaction, happiness, and job satisfaction and reduce burnout symptoms in this health care profession.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , General Practitioners/psychology , Happiness , Job Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Aust J Gen Pract ; 50(6): 388-393, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Immunisation uptake in Australian older adults is suboptimal. General practice registrars are responsible for a significant proportion of immunisations in this age group and are also in the process of developing patterns of practice. Despite their role, little is known about general practice registrars' attitudes towards immunisation of older adults, the barriers faced, and the role supervisors play in developing adult immunisation skills. METHOD: This was a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with general practice registrars and supervisors purposively sampled from around Australia. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The five key themes were grouped in terms of perceptions of registrars' role in immunisation of older adults, consultation barriers, health system barriers, managing vaccine hesitancy, and a team approach to vaccination. DISCUSSION: Vaccine positivity is an important attitude to cultivate within the general practice environment as it has an impact on registrar behaviour. Immunisation-skilled nurses could play a role in training general practice registrars in immunisation. Findings from the present study may be useful in improving vaccine uptake in the elderly in the context of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , General Practitioners/psychology , Physician's Role , Aged , Australia/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communication Barriers , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Nurse's Role , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Care Team , Physician-Patient Relations , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e23742, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The worldwide burden of musculoskeletal diseases is increasing. The number of newly registered rheumatologists has stagnated. Primary care, which takes up a key role in early detection of rheumatic disease, is working at full capacity. COVID-19 and its containment impede rheumatological treatment. Telemedicine in rheumatology (telerheumatology) could support rheumatologists and general practitioners. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate acceptance and preferences related to the use of telerheumatology care among German rheumatologists and general practitioners. METHODS: A nationwide, cross-sectional, self-completed, paper-based survey on telerheumatology care was conducted among outpatient rheumatologists and general practitioners during the pre-COVID-19 period. RESULTS: A total of 73.3% (349/476) of survey participants rated their knowledge of telemedicine as unsatisfactory, poor, or very poor. The majority of survey participants (358/480, 74.6%) answered that they do not currently use telemedicine, although 62.3% (291/467) would like to. Barriers to the implementation of telemedicine include the purchase of technology equipment (182/292, 62.3%), administration (181/292, 62.0%), and poor reimbursement (156/292, 53.4%). A total of 69.6% (117/168) of the surveyed physicians reckoned that telemedicine could be used in rheumatology. Surveyed physicians would prefer to use telemedicine to communicate directly with other physicians (370/455, 81.3%) than to communicate with patients (213/455, 46.8%). Among treatment phases, 64.4% (291/452) of participants would choose to use telemedicine during follow-up. Half of the participants would choose telecounseling as a specific approach to improve rheumatology care (91/170, 53.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Before COVID-19 appeared, our results indicated generally low use but high acceptance of the implementation of telerheumatology among physicians. Participants indicated that the lack of a structural framework was a barrier to the effective implementation of telerheumatology. Training courses should be introduced to address the limited knowledge on the part of physicians in the use of telemedicine. More research into telerheumatology is required. This includes large-scale randomized controlled trials, economic analyses, and the exploration of user preferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , General Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatologists/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Practitioners/psychology , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rheumatologists/psychology , Rheumatology/methods , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090343

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the psycho-emotional impact and the adjustment degree of Romanian general practitioners (GPs) in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic context. With a cross-sectional design, the study included 677 GPs to whom a validated questionnaire based on different items targeting three factors was sent: burden of prevention, presence of stress symptoms, and adjustment to pandemic. The burden of prevention and the adjustment effort to the pandemic were felt significantly more by female doctors and by GPs working in associated offices. The case definition quality, the support received, the professional life changes, and the stress symptoms proved to be the main predictors for the adjustment to pandemic. The adjustment measurement questionnaire can be used in further studies to identify the most supportive public health practices in difficult epidemiological contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Romania/epidemiology
13.
Infect Dis Health ; 26(3): 166-172, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has brought unprecedented demands to general practitioners (GPs) worldwide. We examined their knowledge, preparedness, and experiences managing COVID-19 in Australia. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey of GPs members of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) was conducted between June and September 2020. RESULTS: Out of 244 survey responses, a majority of GPs (76.6%) indicated having good knowledge of COVID-19, relying mostly on state/territory department of health (84.4%) and the RACGP (76.2%) websites to source up-to-date information. Most felt prepared to manage patients with COVID-19 (75.7%), yet over half reported not receiving training in the use of PPE. The majority were concerned about contracting SARS-CoV-2, more stressed than usual, and have heavier workloads. Their greatest challenges included scarcity of PPE, personal distress, and information overload. CONCLUSION: Access to PPE, training, accurate information, and preparedness are fundamental for the successful role of general practices during outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Knowledge , Australia , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , General Practitioners/education , Health Education , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
14.
Eur J Public Health ; 31(2): 283-285, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082684

ABSTRACT

France has been at the epicenter of the worldwide debate about hydroxychloroquine, as the main advocacy for its use to treat COVID-19 comes from a research unit led by Didier Raoult in Marseille. Among a national panel of 2940 general practitioners, we found that physicians in the areas most strongly affected by the epidemic or closest to the epicenter of the controversy reported that the hydroxychloroquine debate had made it difficult for them to deal with patients' treatment requests. Their adherence to official recommendations was also lower. It will be necessary to examine the conditions producing so strong a conflict.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Hydroxychloroquine , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , General Practitioners/psychology , General Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Physician-Patient Relations , Practice Guidelines as Topic
15.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 36, 2021 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081417

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the world in early 2020. In France, General Practitioners (GPs) were not involved in the care organization's decision-making process before and during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. This omission could have generated stress for GPs. We aimed first to estimate the self-perception of stress as defined by the 10-item Perceived Stress Score (PSS-10), at the beginning of the pandemic in France, among GPs from the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, a french administrative area severely impacted by COVID-19. Second, we aimed to identify factors associated with a self-perceived stress (PSS-10 ≥ 27) among socio-demographic characteristics of GPs, their access to reliable information and to personal protective equipment during the pandemic, and their exposure to well established psychosocial risk at work. METHODS: We conducted an online cross-sectional survey between 8th April and 10th May 2020. The self-perception of stress was evaluated using the PSS-10, so to see the proportion of "not stressed" (≤20), "borderline" (21 ≤ PSS-10 ≤ 26), and "stressed" (≥27) GPs. The agreement to 31 positive assertions related to possible sources of stress identified by the scientific study committee was measured using a 10-point numeric scale. In complete cases, factors associated with stress (PSS-10 ≥ 27) were investigated using logistic regression, adjusted on gender, age and practice location. A supplementary analysis of the verbatims was made. RESULTS: Overall, 898 individual answers were collected, of which 879 were complete. A total of 437 GPs (49%) were stressed (PSS-10 ≥ 27), and 283 GPs (32%) had a very high level of stress (PSS-10 ≥ 30). Self-perceived stress was associated with multiple components, and involved classic psychosocial risk factors such as emotional requirements. However, in this context of health crisis, the primary source of stress was the diversity and quantity of information from diverse sources (614 GPs (69%, OR = 2.21, 95%CI [1.40-3.50], p < 0.001). Analysis of verbatims revealed that GPs felt isolated in a hospital-based model. CONCLUSION: The first wave of the pandemic was a source of stress for GPs. The diversity and quantity of information received from the health authorities were among the main sources of stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , General Practitioners , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Health/trends , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/instrumentation , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , France/epidemiology , General Practitioners/psychology , General Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
16.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 6, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is when someone is awake, in a sitting, lying or reclining posture and is an independent risk factor for multiple causes of morbidity and mortality. A dose-response relationship has been demonstrated, whereby increasing sedentary time corresponds with increasing mortality rate. This study aimed to identify current levels of sedentary behaviour among General Practitioners (GPs), by examining and synthesising how sedentary behaviour has been measured in the primary care literature. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted to identify studies relating to levels of sedentary behaviour among GPs. Searches were performed using Medline®, Embase®, PscycINFO, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library, from inception of databases until January 2020, with a subsequent search of grey literature. Articles were assessed for quality and bias, with extraction of relevant data. RESULTS: The search criteria returned 1707 studies. Thirty four full texts were reviewed and 2 studies included in the final review. Both were cross-sectional surveys using self-reported estimation of sedentary time within the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Keohane et al. examined GP trainees and GP trainers in Ireland. 60% reported spending in excess of 7 h sitting each day, 24% between 4 and 7 h, and 16% less than or equal to 4 h. Suija et al. examined female GPs in Estonia. The mean reported daily sitting time was 6 h and 36 min, with 56% sitting for over 6 h per day. Both studies were of satisfactory methodological quality but had a high risk of bias. CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of research examining current levels of sedentary behaviour among GPs. Objective data is needed to determine GPs' current levels of sedentary behaviour, particularly in light of the increase in remote consulting as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Health Promotion , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Self Report , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 18, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been a worldwide public health emergency that has put great pressure on medical workers and the medical system. General Practitioners (GPs) played an important role in controlling the epidemic, and GP trainees also took an active part in this approach. This study was to explore Chinese GP trainees' career perspectives after COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative research study which included 12 GP trainees from three teaching hospitals in China. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted. Grounded theory and thematic analysis were used to code the data and identify categories and factors. RESULTS: Eleven participants chose to continue a GP career after COVID-19, and nearly half of the participants strengthened their determination to dedicate themselves to this career. Only one participant decided to change the career choice because of interest in another specialty. Four main themes influencing GP trainees' perceptions of career development after COVID-19 emerged from the interviews: changes of GPs' work content in COVID-19, challenges of being a GP, psychological changes of the career, how to provide better primary care. Although some negative psychological changes existed, most of participants were inspired by role models and medical colleagues. They had more in-depth understanding of GPs' role and responsibility during COVID-19, and exhibited intensions for self-improvement in career development, especially in public health education and self-protection in preventing infectious diseases. In addition, the wide use of telemedicine provided a new work way for GP trainees. However, challenges, such as increased workloads, low income, lack of resources in primary medical institutions, and distrust of GPs are faced by trainees during the outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, no substantial changes were seen in the career choice of GP trainees after COVID-19 outbreak. However, they were inspired and had an in-depth understanding about the GP's work and responsibility during an epidemic. Owing to the challenges faced by the GPs, measures are needed to improve the GP education and work environment in the training phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Education, Medical/methods , General Practice/education , General Practitioners/psychology , Qualitative Research , Adult , China , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
19.
J Investig Med ; 68(7): 1228-1234, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694415

ABSTRACT

Healthcare providers commonly experience symptoms of anxiety during public health crises and pandemics. The objective of the study was to identify the frequency of symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in general practitioners and to estimate the association with particular psychosocial and demographic factors. This is a cross-sectional study, where a total of 531 general practitioners completed an online form that contained sociodemographic variables, questions about fear and perceptions concerning medical work during the COVID-19 pandemic, 7-Item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), questionnaire on psychosomatic problems and Fear of COVID-19 Scale. The presence of symptoms of GAD was defined by a GAD-7 score of 10 or more points. Voluntary and anonymous participation, acceptance of terms, and informed consent were requested. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Symptoms of GAD were identified in 4 out of 10 Colombian general practitioners; the following psychosocial and demographic factors were associated with a greater presence of these symptoms: female gender, social discrimination, anguish, job disappointment, nightmares, stress and other symptoms of fear regarding the pandemic. Conversely, feeling protected by the state or employer, being satisfied with their job as a physician, and trusting government measures and information were associated with a lower presence of symptoms of GAD. These findings highlight the importance of timely psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological interventions in these individuals. The authors suggest mental health providers should be deployed during times of crisis to decrease the risk of developing mental illness.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(6): e039674, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608159

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The current COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the measures taken to control it, have a profound impact on healthcare. This study was set up to gain insights into the consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak on the core competencies of general practice, as they are experienced by general practitioners (GPs) on the frontline. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: We performed a descriptive study using semistructured interviews with 132 GPs in Flanders, using a topic list based on the WONCA definition of core competencies in general practice. Data were analysed qualitatively using framework analysis. RESULTS: Changes in practice management and in consultation strategies were quickly adopted. There was a major switch towards telephone triage and consults, for covid-related as well as for non-covid related problems. Patient-centred care is still a major objective. Clinical decision-making is largely focused on respiratory assessment and triage, and GPs feel that acute care is compromised, both by their own changed focus and by the fact that patients consult less frequently for non-covid problems. Chronic care is mostly postponed, and this will have consequences that will extend and become visible after the corona crisis. Through the holistic eyes of primary care, the current outbreak-as well as the measures taken to control it-will have a profound impact on psychological and socioeconomic well-being. This impact is already visible in vulnerable people and will continue to become clear in the medium and long terms. GPs think that they are at high risk of getting infected. Dropping out and being unable to contribute their part or becoming virus transmitters are reported to be greater concerns than getting ill themselves. CONCLUSIONS: The current times have a profound impact on the core competences of primary care. Although the vast increase in patients soliciting medical help and the necessary separate covid and non-covid flows have been dealt with, GPs are worried about the continuity of regular care and the consequences of the anticovid measures. These may become a threat for the general health of the population and for the provision of primary healthcare in the near and distant future.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , General Practitioners/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Adult , Belgium , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Disease Management , Female , General Practice/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Qualitative Research
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