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4.
Surgery ; 170(6): 1652-1658, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316640

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In surgical training, assessment tools based on strong validity evidence allow for standardized evaluation despite changing external circumstances. At a large academic institution, surgical interns undergo a multimodal curriculum for central line placement that uses a 31-item binary assessment at the start of each academic year. This study evaluated this practice within increased in-person learning restrictions. We hypothesized that external constraints would not affect resident performance nor assessment due to a robust curriculum and assessment checklist. METHODS: From 2018 to 2020, 81 residents completed central line training and assessment. In 2020, this curriculum was modified to conform to in-person restrictions and social distancing guidelines. Resident score reports were analyzed using multivariate analyses to compare performance, objective scoring parameters, and subjective assessments among "precoronavirus disease" years (2018 and 2019) and 2020. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in average scores or objective pass rates over 3 years. Significant differences between 2020 and precoronavirus disease years occurred in subjective pass rates and in first-time success for 4 checklist items: patient positioning, draping, sterile ultrasound probe cover placement, and needle positioning before venipuncture. CONCLUSION: Modifications to procedural training within current restrictions did not adversely affect residents' overall performance. However, our data suggest that in 2020, expert trainers may not have ensured learner acquisition of automated procedural steps. Additionally, although 2020 raters could have been influenced by logistical barriers leading to more lenient grading, the assessment tool ensured training and assessment integrity.


Subject(s)
Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/education , COVID-19 , Educational Measurement/standards , General Surgery/standards , Humans
5.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 487-492, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288676

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, our emergency general surgery (EGS) service underwent significant restructuring, including establishing an enhanced ambulatory service and undertaking nonoperative management of selected pathologies. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of our EGS service before and after these changes. METHODS: Patients referred by the emergency department were identified prospectively over a 4-week period beginning from the date our EGS service was reconfigured (COVID) and compared with patients identified retrospectively from the same period the previous year (Pre-COVID), and followed up for 30 days. Data were extracted from handover documents and electronic care records. The primary outcomes were the rate of admission, ambulation and discharge. RESULTS: There were 281 and 283 patients during the Pre-COVID and COVID periods respectively. Admission rate decreased from 78.7% to 41.7%, while there were increased rates of ambulation from 7.1% to 17.3% and discharge from 6% to 22.6% (all p<0.001). For inpatients, mean duration of admission decreased (6.9 to 4.8 days), and there were fewer operative or endoscopic interventions (78 to 40). There were increased ambulatory investigations (11 to 39) and telephone reviews (0 to 39), while early computed tomography scan was increasingly used to facilitate discharge (5% vs 34.7%). There were no differences in 30-day readmission or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Restructuring of our EGS service in response to COVID-19 facilitated an increased use of ambulatory services and imaging, achieving a decrease of 952 inpatient bed days in this critical period, while maintaining patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/standards , Female , Follow-Up Studies , General Surgery/standards , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/standards , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
6.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 17, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106313

ABSTRACT

Member States at this year's World Health Assembly 73 (WHA73), held virtually for the first time due to the COVID-19 pandemic, passed multiple resolutions that must be considered when framing efforts to strengthen surgical systems. Surgery has been a relatively neglected field in the global health landscape due to its nature as a cross-cutting treatment rather than focusing on a specific disease or demographic. However, in recent years, access to essential and emergency surgical, obstetric, and anesthesia care has gained increasing recognition as a vital aspect of global health. The WHA73 Resolutions concern specific conditions, as has been characteristic of global health practice, yet proper care for each highlighted disease is inextricably linked to surgical care. Global surgery advocates must recognize how surgical system strengthening aligns with these strategic priorities in order to ensure that surgical care continues to be integrated into efforts to decrease global health disparities.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/standards , COVID-19 , General Surgery , Global Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/organization & administration , Obstetrics/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , General Surgery/organization & administration , General Surgery/standards , Global Health/standards , Global Health/trends , Humans , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Can J Surg ; 63(3): E229-E230, 2020 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-226013

ABSTRACT

Summary: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accentuated the importance of leadership training for health care professionals, particularly surgeons. Surgeons are expected to lead and thrive in multidisciplinary teams. There is, however, a critical gap in teaching residents about fundamental leadership principles, such as developing productive and vision-driven teams, conflict resolution and emotional intelligence. We discuss the merits of leadership training for surgical residents and future directions for implementing a leadership curriculum for Canadian residency programs in the competency by design era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Leadership , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Canada , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , General Surgery/standards , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Patient Care Team/standards , Teaching
12.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A ; 30(5): 481-484, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125506

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) strain has caused a pandemic that affects everyday clinical practice. Care of patients with acute surgical problems is adjusted to minimize exposing health care providers to this highly contagious virus. Our goal is to describe a specific and reproducible perioperative protocol aiming to keep health care providers safe and, simultaneously, not compromise standard of care for surgical patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , General Surgery/standards , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards , Algorithms , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols/standards , Emergencies , Humans , Massachusetts , Patient Care Team/standards , United States
15.
Zhonghua Wai Ke Za Zhi ; 58(3): 170-177, 2020 Mar 01.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-9956

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease(COVID-19) is a highly infectious disease, has a long incubation period and a variety of clinical manifestations, which has a significant impact on public health and life. Afterwards, scientific and standardized work processing during the epidemic is of great significance for prevention and control. In order to implement the central government's decision-making deployment and defeat the COVID-19 as soon as possible, we had focused on the key points in the clinical work of general surgery according to latest relevant guidelines, literature and experience in epidemic prevention. Finally, we drafted the prevention and control strategies and recommendations to make a reference for medical staff of general surgery to fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , General Surgery/standards , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , China , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
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