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1.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(6): 1949-1957, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with inborn errors of immunity (IEI) are at increased risk of severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Effective vaccination against COVID-19 is therefore of great importance in this group, but little is known about the immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines in these patients. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study humoral and cellular immune responses after mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccination in adult patients with IEI. METHODS: In a prospective, controlled, multicenter study, 505 patients with IEI (common variable immunodeficiency [CVID], isolated or undefined antibody deficiencies, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency, phagocyte defects) and 192 controls were included. All participants received 2 doses of the mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. Levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2-specific binding antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and T-cell responses were assessed at baseline, 28 days after first vaccination, and 28 days after second vaccination. RESULTS: Seroconversion rates in patients with clinically mild antibody deficiencies and phagocyte defects were similar to those in healthy controls, but seroconversion rates in patients with more severe IEI, such as CVID and combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency, were lower. Binding antibody titers correlated well to the presence of neutralizing antibodies. T-cell responses were comparable to those in controls in all IEI cohorts, with the exception of patients with CVID. The presence of noninfectious complications and the use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with CVID were negatively correlated with the antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccination with mRNA-1273 was immunogenic in mild antibody deficiencies and phagocyte defects and in most patients with combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency and CVID. Lowest response was detected in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and in patients with CVID with noninfectious complications. The assessment of longevity of immune responses in these vulnerable patient groups will guide decision making for additional vaccinations.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/blood , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/therapeutic use , Adult , Agammaglobulinemia/genetics , Agammaglobulinemia/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/genetics , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/blood , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/genetics , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/blood , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/genetics , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/genetics , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
2.
Am J Med Genet A ; 188(4): 1142-1148, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593959

ABSTRACT

We studied if clinicians could gain sufficient working knowledge of a computer-assisted diagnostic decision support system (DDSS) (SimulConsult), to make differential diagnoses (DDx) of genetic disorders. We hypothesized that virtual training could be convenient, asynchronous, and effective in teaching clinicians how to use a DDSS. We determined the efficacy of virtual, asynchronous teaching for clinicians to gain working knowledge to make computer-assisted DDx. Our study consisted of three surveys (Baseline, Training, and After Use) and a series of case problems sent to clinicians at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. All participants were able to generate computer-assisted DDx that achieved passing scores of the case problems. Between 75% and 92% agreed/completely agreed the DDSS was useful to their work and for clinical decision support and was easy to use. Participants' use of the DDSS resulted in statistically significant time savings in key tasks and in total time spent on clinical tasks. Our results indicate that virtual, asynchronous teaching can be an effective format to gain a working knowledge of a DDSS, and its clinical use could result in significant time savings across multiple tasks as well as facilitate synergistic interaction between clinicians and lab specialists. This approach is especially pertinent and offers value amid the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/diagnosis , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Teaching , User-Computer Interface , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted/methods , Education, Medical , Humans , Physicians , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Clin Immunol ; 41(7): 1446-1456, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453806

ABSTRACT

STAT2 is distinguished from other STAT family members by its exclusive involvement in type I and III interferon (IFN-I/III) signaling pathways, and its unique behavior as both positive and negative regulator of IFN-I signaling. The clinical relevance of these opposing STAT2 functions is exemplified by monogenic diseases of STAT2. Autosomal recessive STAT2 deficiency results in heightened susceptibility to severe and/or recurrent viral disease, whereas homozygous missense substitution of the STAT2-R148 residue is associated with severe type I interferonopathy due to loss of STAT2 negative regulation. Here we review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and management of these disorders of STAT2.


Subject(s)
Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Immune System Diseases/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Animals , Gain of Function Mutation , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Immune System Diseases/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , Phenotype , STAT2 Transcription Factor/chemistry , STAT2 Transcription Factor/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323263

ABSTRACT

Efficient delivery of genetic material into cells is a critical process to translate gene therapy into clinical practice. In this sense, the increased knowledge acquired during past years in the molecular biology and nanotechnology fields has contributed to the development of different kinds of non-viral vector systems as a promising alternative to virus-based gene delivery counterparts. Consequently, the development of non-viral vectors has gained attention, and nowadays, gene delivery mediated by these systems is considered as the cornerstone of modern gene therapy due to relevant advantages such as low toxicity, poor immunogenicity and high packing capacity. However, despite these relevant advantages, non-viral vectors have been poorly translated into clinical success. This review addresses some critical issues that need to be considered for clinical practice application of non-viral vectors in mainstream medicine, such as efficiency, biocompatibility, long-lasting effect, route of administration, design of experimental condition or commercialization process. In addition, potential strategies for overcoming main hurdles are also addressed. Overall, this review aims to raise awareness among the scientific community and help researchers gain knowledge in the design of safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems for clinical applications to progress in the gene therapy field.


Subject(s)
Gene Transfer Techniques , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/therapy , Genetic Therapy/methods , Genetic Vectors/administration & dosage , Nanoparticles/administration & dosage , Animals , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Humans
7.
J Exp Med ; 218(4)2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066211

ABSTRACT

Yellow fever virus (YFV) live attenuated vaccine can, in rare cases, cause life-threatening disease, typically in patients with no previous history of severe viral illness. Autosomal recessive (AR) complete IFNAR1 deficiency was reported in one 12-yr-old patient. Here, we studied seven other previously healthy patients aged 13 to 80 yr with unexplained life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease. One 13-yr-old patient had AR complete IFNAR2 deficiency. Three other patients vaccinated at the ages of 47, 57, and 64 yr had high titers of circulating auto-Abs against at least 14 of the 17 individual type I IFNs. These antibodies were recently shown to underlie at least 10% of cases of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. The auto-Abs were neutralizing in vitro, blocking the protective effect of IFN-α2 against YFV vaccine strains. AR IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 deficiency and neutralizing auto-Abs against type I IFNs thus accounted for more than half the cases of life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease studied here. Previously healthy subjects could be tested for both predispositions before anti-YFV vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Interferon-alpha , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta , SARS-CoV-2 , Yellow Fever Vaccine , Yellow fever virus , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/deficiency , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/adverse effects , Yellow Fever Vaccine/genetics , Yellow Fever Vaccine/immunology , Yellow fever virus/genetics , Yellow fever virus/immunology
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