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1.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(6): 1949-1957, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with inborn errors of immunity (IEI) are at increased risk of severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Effective vaccination against COVID-19 is therefore of great importance in this group, but little is known about the immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines in these patients. OBJECTIVES: We sought to study humoral and cellular immune responses after mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccination in adult patients with IEI. METHODS: In a prospective, controlled, multicenter study, 505 patients with IEI (common variable immunodeficiency [CVID], isolated or undefined antibody deficiencies, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency, phagocyte defects) and 192 controls were included. All participants received 2 doses of the mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine. Levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2-specific binding antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and T-cell responses were assessed at baseline, 28 days after first vaccination, and 28 days after second vaccination. RESULTS: Seroconversion rates in patients with clinically mild antibody deficiencies and phagocyte defects were similar to those in healthy controls, but seroconversion rates in patients with more severe IEI, such as CVID and combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency, were lower. Binding antibody titers correlated well to the presence of neutralizing antibodies. T-cell responses were comparable to those in controls in all IEI cohorts, with the exception of patients with CVID. The presence of noninfectious complications and the use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with CVID were negatively correlated with the antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccination with mRNA-1273 was immunogenic in mild antibody deficiencies and phagocyte defects and in most patients with combined B- and T-cell immunodeficiency and CVID. Lowest response was detected in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and in patients with CVID with noninfectious complications. The assessment of longevity of immune responses in these vulnerable patient groups will guide decision making for additional vaccinations.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/blood , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/therapeutic use , Adult , Agammaglobulinemia/genetics , Agammaglobulinemia/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/genetics , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/immunology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/blood , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/genetics , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/blood , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/genetics , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/genetics , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Acc Chem Res ; 54(23): 4283-4293, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521679

ABSTRACT

After decades of extensive fundamental studies and clinical trials, lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have demonstrated effective mRNA delivery such as the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines fighting against COVID-19. Moreover, researchers and clinicians have been investigating mRNA therapeutics for a variety of therapeutic indications including protein replacement therapy, genome editing, and cancer immunotherapy. To realize these therapeutics in the clinic, there are many formidable challenges. First, novel delivery systems such as LNPs with high delivery efficiency and low toxicity need to be developed for different cell types. Second, mRNA molecules need to be engineered for improved pharmaceutical properties. Lastly, the LNP-mRNA nanoparticle formulations need to match their therapeutic applications.In this Account, we summarize our recent advances in the design and development of various classes of lipids and lipid derivatives, which can be formulated with multiple types of mRNA molecules to treat diverse diseases. For example, we conceived a series of ionizable lipid-like molecules based on the structures of a benzene core, an amide linker, and hydrophobic tails. We identified N1,N3,N5-tris(3-(didodecylamino)propyl)benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (TT3) as a lead compound for mRNA delivery both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we tuned the biodegradability of these lipid-like molecules by introducing branched ester or linear ester chains. Meanwhile, inspired by biomimetic compounds, we synthesized vitamin-derived lipids, chemotherapeutic conjugated lipids, phospholipids, and glycolipids. These scaffolds greatly broaden the chemical space of ionizable lipids for mRNA delivery. In another section, we highlight our efforts on the research direction of mRNA engineering. We previously optimized mRNA chemistry using chemically-modified nucleotides to increase the protein expression, such as pseudouridine (ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and N1-methylpseudouridine (me1ψ). Also, we engineered the sequences of mRNA 5' untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) and 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTRs), which dramatically enhanced protein expression. With the progress of LNP development and mRNA engineering, we consolidate these technologies and apply them to treat diseases such as genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancers. For instance, TT3 and its analog-derived lipid-like nanoparticles can effectively deliver factor IX or VIII mRNA and recover the clotting activity in hemophilia mouse models. Engineered mRNAs encoding SARS-CoV-2 antigens serve well as vaccine candidates against COVID-19. Vitamin-derived lipid nanoparticles loaded with antimicrobial peptide-cathepsin B mRNA enable adoptive macrophage transfer to treat multidrug resistant bacterial sepsis. Biomimetic lipids such as phospholipids formulated with mRNAs encoding costimulatory receptors lead to enhanced cancer immunotherapy.Overall, lipid-mRNA nanoparticle formulations have considerably benefited public health in the COVID-19 pandemic. To expand their applications in clinical use, research work from many disciplines such as chemistry, engineering, materials, pharmaceutical sciences, and medicine need to be integrated. With these collaborative efforts, we believe that more and more lipid-mRNA nanoparticle formulations will enter the clinic in the near future and benefit human health.


Subject(s)
Drug Carriers/chemistry , Liposomes/chemistry , Nanoparticles/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , Animals , Benzamides/chemistry , Biomimetic Materials/chemistry , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Disease Models, Animal , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/therapy , Humans , Mice , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Phospholipids/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/therapeutic use , Untranslated Regions , Vitamins/chemistry
4.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 148(4): 911-925, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482662

ABSTRACT

Since its discovery, the Janus kinase-signal transduction and activation of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway has become recognized as a central mediator of widespread and varied human physiological processes. The field of JAK-STAT biology, particularly its clinical relevance, continues to be shaped by 2 important advances. First, the increased use of genomic sequencing has led to the discovery of novel clinical syndromes caused by mutations in JAK and STAT genes. This has provided insights regarding the consequences of aberrant JAK-STAT signaling for immunity, lymphoproliferation, and malignancy. In addition, since the approval of ruxolitinib and tofacitinib, the therapeutic use of JAK inhibitors (jakinibs) has expanded to include a large spectrum of diseases. Efficacy and safety data from over a decade of clinical studies have provided additional mechanistic insights while improving the care of patients with inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. This review discusses major advances in the field, focusing on updates in genetic diseases and in studies of clinical jakinibs in human disease.


Subject(s)
Genetic Diseases, Inborn/drug therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Janus Kinases/immunology , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Animals , Cytokines/immunology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Humans , Janus Kinases/genetics , Mutation , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , Signal Transduction
5.
J Clin Immunol ; 41(7): 1446-1456, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453806

ABSTRACT

STAT2 is distinguished from other STAT family members by its exclusive involvement in type I and III interferon (IFN-I/III) signaling pathways, and its unique behavior as both positive and negative regulator of IFN-I signaling. The clinical relevance of these opposing STAT2 functions is exemplified by monogenic diseases of STAT2. Autosomal recessive STAT2 deficiency results in heightened susceptibility to severe and/or recurrent viral disease, whereas homozygous missense substitution of the STAT2-R148 residue is associated with severe type I interferonopathy due to loss of STAT2 negative regulation. Here we review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and management of these disorders of STAT2.


Subject(s)
Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Immune System Diseases/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Animals , Gain of Function Mutation , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Immune System Diseases/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , Phenotype , STAT2 Transcription Factor/chemistry , STAT2 Transcription Factor/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology
7.
Cell ; 181(6): 1194-1199, 2020 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385209

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection displays immense inter-individual clinical variability, ranging from silent infection to lethal disease. The role of human genetics in determining clinical response to the virus remains unclear. Studies of outliers-individuals remaining uninfected despite viral exposure and healthy young patients with life-threatening disease-present a unique opportunity to reveal human genetic determinants of infection and disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Resistance , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Variation , Genome, Human , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Infections/genetics , Infections/immunology , Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 58: 134-140, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1074698

ABSTRACT

Interferons are the best antiviral agents in vitro against SARS-CoV-2 so far and genetic defects in their signaling cascade or neutralization of alfa-interferons by autoantibodies come with more severe COVID-19. However, there is more, as the SARS-CoV-2 dysregulates not only innate immune mechanisms but also T and B cell repertoires. Most genetic, hematological and immunological studies in COVID-19 are at present phenomenological. However, these and antecedent studies contain the seed grains to resolve many unanswered questions and a whole range of testable hypotheses. What are the links, if existing, between genetics and the occurrence of interferon-neutralizing antibodies? Are NAGGED (neutralizing and generated by gene defect) antibodies involved or not? Is the autoimmune process cause or consequence of virus infection? What are the roles played by cytokine posttranslational modifications, such as proteolysis, glycosylation, citrullination and others? How is systemic autoimmunity linked with type 1 interferons? These questions place cytokines and growth factors at pole positions as keys to unlock basic mechanisms of infection and (auto)immunity. Related to cytokine research, (1) COVID-19 patients develop neutralizing autoantibodies, mainly against alpha interferons and it is not yet established whether this is the consequence or cause of virus replication. (2) The glycosylation of recombinant interferon-beta protects against breaking tolerance and the development of neutralizing antibodies. (3) SARS-CoV-2 induces severe inflammation and release of extracellular proteases leading to remnant epitopes, e.g. of cytokines. (4) In the rare event of homozygous cytokine gene segment deletions, observed neutralizing antibodies may be named NAGGED antibodies. (5) Severe cytolysis releases intracellular content into the extracellular milieu and leads to regulated degradation of intracellular proteins and selection of antibody repertoires, similar to those observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. (6) Systematic studies of novel autoimmune diseases on single cytokines will complement the present picture about interferons. (7) Interferon neutralization in COVID-19 constitutes a preamble of more studies about cytokine-regulated proteolysis in the control of autoimmunity. Here we reformulate these seven conjectures into testable questions for future research.


Subject(s)
Autoimmunity , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/physiology , Interferons/physiology , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmunity/genetics , Autoimmunity/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/complications , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/epidemiology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Humans
9.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 58: 55-65, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071239

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a recently identified coronavirus accountable for the current pandemic disease known as COVID-19. Different patterns of disease progression infer a diverse host immune response, with interferon (IFN) being pivotal. IFN-I and III are produced and released by virus-infected cells during the interplay with SARS-CoV-2, thus establishing an antiviral state in target cells. However, the efficacy of IFN and its role in the possible outcomes of the disease are not yet defined, as it is influenced both by factors inherent to the virus and to the host. The virus exhibits multiple strategies to counteract the innate immune response, including those shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV and other novel ones. Inborn errors in the host may affect IFN-related effector proteins or decrease its levels in plasma upon neutralization by preexistent autoantibodies. This battle between the IFN response triggered upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, its magnitude and timing, and the efficacy of its antiviral tools in dispute against the viral evasion strategies together with the genetic factors of the host, generate a scenario whose fate contributes to defining the severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Interferon Type I/physiology , Interferons/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/complications , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Immune Evasion/immunology , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferon Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
J Exp Med ; 218(4)2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066211

ABSTRACT

Yellow fever virus (YFV) live attenuated vaccine can, in rare cases, cause life-threatening disease, typically in patients with no previous history of severe viral illness. Autosomal recessive (AR) complete IFNAR1 deficiency was reported in one 12-yr-old patient. Here, we studied seven other previously healthy patients aged 13 to 80 yr with unexplained life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease. One 13-yr-old patient had AR complete IFNAR2 deficiency. Three other patients vaccinated at the ages of 47, 57, and 64 yr had high titers of circulating auto-Abs against at least 14 of the 17 individual type I IFNs. These antibodies were recently shown to underlie at least 10% of cases of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. The auto-Abs were neutralizing in vitro, blocking the protective effect of IFN-α2 against YFV vaccine strains. AR IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 deficiency and neutralizing auto-Abs against type I IFNs thus accounted for more than half the cases of life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease studied here. Previously healthy subjects could be tested for both predispositions before anti-YFV vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Interferon-alpha , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta , SARS-CoV-2 , Yellow Fever Vaccine , Yellow fever virus , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/deficiency , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/adverse effects , Yellow Fever Vaccine/genetics , Yellow Fever Vaccine/immunology , Yellow fever virus/genetics , Yellow fever virus/immunology
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