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1.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2234, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574124

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic is the most serious event of the year 2020, causing considerable global morbidity and mortality. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of reported associations between inter-individual immunogenic variants and disease susceptibility or symptoms caused by the coronavirus strains severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-2, and two of the main respiratory viruses, respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. The results suggest that the genetic background of the host could affect the levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and might modulate the progression of Covid-19 in affected patients. Notably, genetic variations in innate immune components such as toll-like receptors and mannose-binding lectin 2 play critical roles in the ability of the immune system to recognize coronavirus and initiate an early immune response to clear the virus and prevent the development of severe symptoms. This review provides promising clues related to the potential benefits of using immunotherapy and immune modulation for respiratory infectious disease treatment in a personalized manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Influenza, Human/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Variation, Individual , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Mannose-Binding Lectin/genetics , Mannose-Binding Lectin/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/immunology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology
2.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
4.
BMC Med Genomics ; 14(1): 269, 2021 11 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515444

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the number of COVID-19 deaths continues to rise worldwide, the identification of risk factors for the disease is an urgent issue, and it remains controversial whether atherogenic lipid-related traits including serum apolipoprotein B, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, are risk factors. The aim of this study was to estimate causal effects of lipid-related traits on COVID-19 risk in the European population using a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach. METHODS: We used summary statistics from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) that included 441,016 participants from the UK Biobank as the exposure dataset of lipid-related traits and from COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative GWAS meta-analyses of European ancestry as the outcome dataset for COVID-19 susceptibility (32,494 cases and 1,316,207 controls), hospitalization (8316 cases and 1,549,095 controls), and severity (4792 cases and 1,054,664 controls). We performed two-sample MR analyses using the inverse variance weighted (IVW) method. As sensitivity analyses, the MR-Egger regression, weighted median, and weighted mode methods were conducted as were leave-one-out sensitivity analysis, the MR-PRESSO global test, PhenoScanner searches, and IVW multivariable MR analyses. A P value below 0.0055 with Bonferroni correction was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: This MR study suggested that serum apolipoprotein B or LDL-cholesterol levels were not significantly associated with COVID-19 risk. On the other hand, we inferred that higher serum triglyceride levels were suggestively associated with higher risks of COVID-19 susceptibility (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation increase in lifelong triglyceride levels, 1.065; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.001-1.13; P = 0.045) and hospitalization (OR, 1.174; 95% CI, 1.04-1.33; P = 0.012), and were significantly associated with COVID-19 severity (OR, 1.274; 95% CI, 1.08-1.50; P = 0.004). Sensitivity and bidirectional MR analyses suggested that horizontal pleiotropy and reverse causation were unlikely. CONCLUSIONS: Our MR study indicates a causal effect of higher serum triglyceride levels on a greater risk of COVID-19 severity in the European population using the latest and largest GWAS datasets to date. However, as the underlying mechanisms remain unclear and our study might be still biased due to possible horizontal pleiotropy, further studies are warranted to validate our findings and investigate underlying mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein B-100 , COVID-19 , Cholesterol, LDL , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Quantitative Trait, Heritable , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Triglycerides , Apolipoprotein B-100/blood , Apolipoprotein B-100/genetics , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/genetics , Female , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Male , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Triglycerides/blood , Triglycerides/genetics
5.
Cell Rep ; 37(7): 110020, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509641

ABSTRACT

Variability in SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and COVID-19 disease severity between individuals is partly due to genetic factors. Here, we identify 4 genomic loci with suggestive associations for SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and 19 for COVID-19 disease severity. Four of these 23 loci likely have an ethnicity-specific component. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in 11 loci colocalize with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) associated with the expression of 20 genes in 62 tissues/cell types (range: 1:43 tissues/gene), including lung, brain, heart, muscle, and skin as well as the digestive system and immune system. We perform genetic fine mapping to compute 99% credible SNP sets, which identify 10 GWAS loci that have eight or fewer SNPs in the credible set, including three loci with one single likely causal SNP. Our study suggests that the diverse symptoms and disease severity of COVID-19 observed between individuals is associated with variants across the genome, affecting gene expression levels in a wide variety of tissue types.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Humans , Organ Specificity/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome/genetics
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21185, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493214

ABSTRACT

Interferon lambda 4 (IFNλ4) has shown antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including some coronaviruses. Besides, genetic variants of IFNL4 can be predictive of the clearance of RNA viruses. However, little is known about the effect of these genetic variants on SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this study, we investigated whether there was a relationship of the rs12979860 polymorphism of IFNL4 with COVID-19. We found that the T allele of rs12979860 was overexpressed in COVID-19 patients with regard to the general population without this disease (36.16% vs. 26.40%, p = 6.4 × 10-4; OR 0.633 C vs T; 95% CI 0.487, 0.824), suggesting that this allele could be a risk factor for COVID-19. Accordingly, the CC genotype was significantly lower in COVID-19 patients compared to controls (37.85% vs. 55.51%, p = 8 × 10-5; OR 0.488; 95% CI 0.342, 0.698). These results were not affected by sex, age, and disease severity in patients with COVID-19. Our findings suggest that, like other infectious diseases caused by RNA viruses, genetic variants of IFNL4 can predispose to COVID-19. Confirmation of our results may contribute to better understanding the mechanisms of this disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interleukins/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Spain/epidemiology
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20837, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479820

ABSTRACT

Vitamin D is a fundamental regulator of host defences by activating genes related to innate and adaptive immunity. Previous research shows a correlation between the levels of vitamin D in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 and the degree of disease severity. This work investigates the impact of the genetic background related to vitamin D pathways on COVID-19 severity. For the first time, the Portuguese population was characterized regarding the prevalence of high impact variants in genes associated with the vitamin D pathways. This study enrolled 517 patients admitted to two tertiary Portuguese hospitals. The serum concentration of 25 (OH)D, was measured in the hospital at the time of patient admission. Genetic variants, 18 variants, in the genes AMDHD1, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, DHCR7, GC, SEC23A, and VDR were analysed. The results show that polymorphisms in the vitamin D binding protein encoded by the GC gene are related to the infection severity (p = 0.005). There is an association between vitamin D polygenic risk score and the serum concentration of 25 (OH)D (p = 0.04). There is an association between 25 (OH)D levels and the survival and fatal outcomes (p = 1.5e-4). The Portuguese population has a higher prevalence of the DHCR7 RS12785878 variant when compared with its prevalence in the European population (19% versus 10%). This study shows a genetic susceptibility for vitamin D deficiency that might explain higher severity degrees in COVID-19 patients. These results reinforce the relevance of personalized strategies in the context of viral diseases.Trial registration: NCT04370808.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Polymorphism, Genetic , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D/genetics , Aged , Biomarkers , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Cytochrome P450 Family 2/genetics , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors/genetics , Portugal/epidemiology , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index , Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics , Vitamin D-Binding Protein/genetics , Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase/genetics
11.
Elife ; 102021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478420

ABSTRACT

Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) have been offered since 2019 to screen in vitro fertilization embryos for genetic liability to adult diseases, despite a lack of comprehensive modeling of expected outcomes. Here we predict, based on the liability threshold model, the expected reduction in complex disease risk following polygenic embryo screening for a single disease. A strong determinant of the potential utility of such screening is the selection strategy, a factor that has not been previously studied. When only embryos with a very high PRS are excluded, the achieved risk reduction is minimal. In contrast, selecting the embryo with the lowest PRS can lead to substantial relative risk reductions, given a sufficient number of viable embryos. We systematically examine the impact of several factors on the utility of screening, including: variance explained by the PRS, number of embryos, disease prevalence, parental PRSs, and parental disease status. We consider both relative and absolute risk reductions, as well as population-averaged and per-couple risk reductions, and also examine the risk of pleiotropic effects. Finally, we confirm our theoretical predictions by simulating 'virtual' couples and offspring based on real genomes from schizophrenia and Crohn's disease case-control studies. We discuss the assumptions and limitations of our model, as well as the potential emerging ethical concerns.


Subject(s)
Crohn Disease/genetics , Fertilization in Vitro , Genetic Testing , Models, Genetic , Multifactorial Inheritance , Preimplantation Diagnosis , Schizophrenia/genetics , Computer Simulation , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Male , Predictive Value of Tests , Pregnancy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
12.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9982729, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476892

ABSTRACT

The human transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) protein plays an important role in prostate cancer progression. It also facilitates viral entry into target cells by proteolytically cleaving and activating the S protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In the current study, we used different available tools like SIFT, PolyPhen2.0, PROVEAN, SNAP2, PMut, MutPred2, I-Mutant Suite, MUpro, iStable, ConSurf, ModPred, SwissModel, PROCHECK, Verify3D, and TM-align to identify the most deleterious variants and to explore possible effects on the TMPRSS2 stability, structure, and function. The six missense variants tested were evaluated to have deleterious effects on the protein by SIFT, PolyPhen2.0, PROVEAN, SNAP2, and PMut. Additionally, V160M, G181R, R240C, P335L, G432A, and D435Y variants showed a decrease in stability by at least 2 servers; G181R, G432A, and D435Y are highly conserved and identified posttranslational modifications sites (PTMs) for proteolytic cleavage and ADP-ribosylation using ConSurf and ModPred servers. The 3D structure of TMPRSS2 native and mutants was generated using 7 meq as a template from the SwissModeller group, refined by ModRefiner, and validated using the Ramachandran plot. Hence, this paper can be advantageous to understand the association between these missense variants rs12329760, rs781089181, rs762108701, rs1185182900, rs570454392, and rs867186402 and susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Mutation, Missense , Serine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Binding Sites , Computational Biology/methods , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Models, Molecular , Phylogeny , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Protein Conformation , Protein Stability , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
13.
Nat Med ; 27(6): 1012-1024, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472229

ABSTRACT

Age is the dominant risk factor for infectious diseases, but the mechanisms linking age to infectious disease risk are incompletely understood. Age-related mosaic chromosomal alterations (mCAs) detected from genotyping of blood-derived DNA, are structural somatic variants indicative of clonal hematopoiesis, and are associated with aberrant leukocyte cell counts, hematological malignancy, and mortality. Here, we show that mCAs predispose to diverse types of infections. We analyzed mCAs from 768,762 individuals without hematological cancer at the time of DNA acquisition across five biobanks. Expanded autosomal mCAs were associated with diverse incident infections (hazard ratio (HR) 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.36; P = 1.8 × 10-7), including sepsis (HR 2.68; 95% CI = 2.25-3.19; P = 3.1 × 10-28), pneumonia (HR 1.76; 95% CI = 1.53-2.03; P = 2.3 × 10-15), digestive system infections (HR 1.51; 95% CI = 1.32-1.73; P = 2.2 × 10-9) and genitourinary infections (HR 1.25; 95% CI = 1.11-1.41; P = 3.7 × 10-4). A genome-wide association study of expanded mCAs identified 63 loci, which were enriched at transcriptional regulatory sites for immune cells. These results suggest that mCAs are a marker of impaired immunity and confer increased predisposition to infections.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , Communicable Diseases/genetics , Pneumonia/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/pathology , Biological Specimen Banks , Chromosome Aberrations , Communicable Diseases/complications , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/genetics , Digestive System Diseases/microbiology , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genotype , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/genetics , Hematologic Neoplasms/microbiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mosaicism , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/microbiology , Risk Factors , Sepsis/epidemiology , Sepsis/microbiology , Urogenital Abnormalities/epidemiology , Urogenital Abnormalities/genetics , Urogenital Abnormalities/microbiology , Young Adult
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 742881, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470759

ABSTRACT

Despite the high number of individuals infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) who develop coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms worldwide, many exposed individuals remain asymptomatic and/or uninfected and seronegative. This could be explained by a combination of environmental (exposure), immunological (previous infection), epigenetic, and genetic factors. Aiming to identify genetic factors involved in immune response in symptomatic COVID-19 as compared to asymptomatic exposed individuals, we analyzed 83 Brazilian couples where one individual was infected and symptomatic while the partner remained asymptomatic and serum-negative for at least 6 months despite sharing the same bedroom during the infection. We refer to these as "discordant couples". We performed whole-exome sequencing followed by a state-of-the-art method to call genotypes and haplotypes across the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. The discordant partners had comparable ages and genetic ancestry, but women were overrepresented (65%) in the asymptomatic group. In the antigen-presentation pathway, we observed an association between HLA-DRB1 alleles encoding Lys at residue 71 (mostly DRB1*03:01 and DRB1*04:01) and DOB*01:02 with symptomatic infections and HLA-A alleles encoding 144Q/151R with asymptomatic seronegative women. Among the genes related to immune modulation, we detected variants in MICA and MICB associated with symptomatic infections. These variants are related to higher expression of soluble MICA and low expression of MICB. Thus, quantitative differences in these molecules that modulate natural killer (NK) activity could contribute to susceptibility to COVID-19 by downregulating NK cell cytotoxic activity in infected individuals but not in the asymptomatic partners.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19 , Histocompatibility Antigens , Major Histocompatibility Complex , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Brazil , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Histocompatibility Antigens/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens/immunology , Humans , Major Histocompatibility Complex/genetics , Major Histocompatibility Complex/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Whole Exome Sequencing
15.
EBioMedicine ; 72: 103629, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469839

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) poses an unprecedented challenge to humanity. SARS-CoV-2 infections range from asymptomatic to severe courses of COVID-19 with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan involvement and death. Risk factors for disease severity include older age, male sex, increased BMI and pre-existing comorbidities. Ethnicity is also relevant to COVID-19 susceptibility and severity. Host genetic predisposition to COVID-19 is now increasingly recognized and whole genome and candidate gene association studies regarding COVID-19 susceptibility have been performed. Several common and rare variants in genes related to inflammation or immune responses have been identified. We summarize research on COVID-19 host genetics and compile genetic variants associated with susceptibility to COVID-19 and disease severity. We discuss candidate genes that should be investigated further to understand such associations and provide insights relevant to pathogenesis, risk classification, therapy response, precision medicine, and drug repurposing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Immunity , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 14(11): 1021-1032, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463067

ABSTRACT

Up to 10% of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) carry underlying germline pathogenic variants in cancer susceptibility genes. The GENetic Education Risk Assessment and TEsting (GENERATE) study aimed to evaluate novel methods of genetic education and testing in relatives of patients with PDAC. Eligible individuals had a family history of PDAC and a relative with a germline pathogenic variant in APC, ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDKN2A, EPCAM, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PALB2, PMS2, STK11, or TP53 genes. Participants were recruited at six academic cancer centers and through social media campaigns and patient advocacy efforts. Enrollment occurred via the study website (https://GENERATEstudy.org) and all participation, including collecting a saliva sample for genetic testing, could be done from home. Participants were randomized to one of two remote methods that delivered genetic education about the risks of inherited PDAC and strategies for surveillance. The primary outcome of the study was uptake of genetic testing. From 5/8/2019 to 5/6/2020, 49 participants were randomized to each of the intervention arms. Overall, 90 of 98 (92%) of randomized participants completed genetic testing. The most frequently detected pathogenic variants included those in BRCA2 (N = 15, 17%), ATM (N = 11, 12%), and CDKN2A (N = 4, 4%). Participation in the study remained steady throughout the onset of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Preliminary data from the GENERATE study indicate success of remote alternatives to traditional cascade testing, with genetic testing rates over 90% and a high rate of identification of germline pathogenic variant carriers who would be ideal candidates for PDAC interception approaches. PREVENTION RELEVANCE: Preliminary data from the GENERATE study indicate success of remote alternatives for pancreatic cancer genetic testing and education, with genetic testing uptake rates over 90% and a high rate of identification of germline pathogenic variant carriers who would be ideal candidates for pancreatic cancer interception.


Subject(s)
BRCA1 Protein/genetics , BRCA2 Protein/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Testing/methods , Germ-Line Mutation , Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics , Risk Assessment/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/genetics , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/pathology , Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Genetic , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Participation , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
17.
Open Biol ; 11(10): 210213, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462586

ABSTRACT

The etiopathogenesis of COVID-19 and its differential geographic spread suggest some populations are apparently 'less affected' through many host-related factors that involve angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) protein, which is also the entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. The role of ACE2 has been well studied in COVID-19 but not in the context of malaria and COVID-19. We have previously suggested how malaria might intersect with COVID-19 through ACE2 mutation and here we evaluate the currently available data that could provide a link between the two diseases. Based on the existing global and Indian data on malaria, COVID-19 and the suggested ACE2 mutation, the association could not be examined robustly, neither accepting nor refuting the suggested hypothesis. We strongly recommend targeted evaluation of this hypothesis through carefully designed robust molecular epidemiological studies.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Malaria/complications , Malaria/epidemiology , Alleles , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Variation , Geography , Global Health , Humans , India , Mutation
19.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 912: 174548, 2021 Dec 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446596

ABSTRACT

The importance of sex differences is increasingly acknowledged in the incidence and treatment of disease. Accumulating clinical evidence demonstrates that sex differences are noticeable in COVID-19, and the prevalence, severity, and mortality rate of COVID-19 are higher among males than females. Sex-related genetic and hormonal factors and immunological responses may underlie the sex bias in COVID-19 patients. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane protease/serine subfamily member 2 (TMPRSS2) are essential proteins involved in the cell entry of SARS-CoV-2. Since ACE2 is encoded on the X-chromosome, a double copy of ACE2 in females may compensate for virus-mediated downregulation of ACE2, and thus ACE2-mediated cellular protection is greater in females. The X chromosome also contains the largest immune-related genes leading females to develop more robust immune responses than males. Toll-like receptor-7 (TLR-7), one of the key players in innate immunity, is linked to sex differences in autoimmunity and vaccine efficacy, and its expression is greater in females. Sex steroids also affect immune cell function. Estrogen contributes to higher CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation levels, and females have more B cells than males. Sex differences not only affect the severity and progression of the disease, but also alter the efficacy of pharmacological treatment and adverse events related to the drugs/vaccines used against COVID-19. Administration of different drugs/vaccines in different doses or intervals may be useful to eliminate sex differences in efficacy and side/adverse effects. It should be noted that studies should include sex-specific analyses to develop further sex-specific treatments for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Estrogens/genetics , Estrogens/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Sex Characteristics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
20.
Immunogenetics ; 73(6): 449-458, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427233

ABSTRACT

Associations between inherited Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) genotypes and the severity of multiple RNA virus infections have been reported. This prospective study was initiated to investigate if such an association exists for COVID-19. In this cohort study performed at Ankara University, 132 COVID-19 patients (56 asymptomatic, 51 mild-intermediate, and 25 patients with severe disease) were genotyped for KIR and ligands. Ankara University Donor Registry (n:449) KIR data was used for comparison. Clinical parameters (age, gender, comorbidities, blood group antigens, inflammation biomarkers) and KIR genotypes across cohorts of asymptomatic, mild-intermediate, or severe disease were compared to construct a risk prediction model based on multivariate binary logistic regression analysis with backward elimination method. Age, blood group, number of comorbidities, CRP, D-dimer, and telomeric and centromeric KIR genotypes (tAA, tAB1, and cAB1) along with their cognate ligands were found to differ between cohorts. Two prediction models were constructed; both included age, number of comorbidities, and blood group. Inclusion of the KIR genotypes in the second prediction model exp (-3.52 + 1.56 age group - 2.74 blood group (type A vs others) + 1.26 number of comorbidities - 2.46 tAB1 with ligand + 3.17 tAA with ligand) increased the predictive performance with a 92.9% correct classification for asymptomatic and 76% for severe cases (AUC: 0.93; P < 0.0001, 95% CI 0.88, 0.99). This novel risk model, consisting of KIR genotypes with their cognate ligands, and clinical parameters but excluding earlier published inflammation-related biomarkers allow for the prediction of the severity of COVID-19 infection prior to the onset of infection. This study is listed in the National COVID-19 clinical research studies database.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Receptors, KIR/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology , HLA Antigens/genetics , Haplotypes , Humans , Ligands , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
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