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1.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(3): 1551-1561, 2022 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636373

ABSTRACT

During the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, large-scale genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 has been useful in tracking its spread and in identifying variants of concern (VOC). Viral and host factors could contribute to variability within a host that can be captured in next-generation sequencing reads as intra-host single nucleotide variations (iSNVs). Analysing 1347 samples collected till June 2020, we recorded 16 410 iSNV sites throughout the SARS-CoV-2 genome. We found ∼42% of the iSNV sites to be reported as SNVs by 30 September 2020 in consensus sequences submitted to GISAID, which increased to ∼80% by 30th June 2021. Following this, analysis of another set of 1774 samples sequenced in India between November 2020 and May 2021 revealed that majority of the Delta (B.1.617.2) and Kappa (B.1.617.1) lineage-defining variations appeared as iSNVs before getting fixed in the population. Besides, mutations in RdRp as well as RNA-editing by APOBEC and ADAR deaminases seem to contribute to the differential prevalence of iSNVs in hosts. We also observe hyper-variability at functionally critical residues in Spike protein that could alter the antigenicity and may contribute to immune escape. Thus, tracking and functional annotation of iSNVs in ongoing genome surveillance programs could be important for early identification of potential variants of concern and actionable interventions.


Subject(s)
Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , APOBEC-1 Deaminase/genetics , Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Immune Evasion/genetics , India/epidemiology , Phylogeny , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells
2.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598446

ABSTRACT

Organ-specific proteins (OSPs) possess great medical potential both in clinics and in biomedical research. Applications of them-such as alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and troponins-in clinics have raised certain concerns of their organ specificity. The dynamics and diversity of protein expression in heterogeneous human populations are well known, yet their effects on OSPs are less addressed. Here, we used mice as a model and implemented a breadth study to examine the panorgan proteome for potential variations in organ specificity in different genetic backgrounds. Using reasonable resources, we generated panorgan proteomes of four in-bred mouse strains. The results revealed a large diversity that was more profound among OSPs than among proteomes overall. We defined a robustness score to quantify such variation and derived three sets of OSPs with different stringencies. In the meantime, we found that the enriched biological functions of OSPs are also organ-specific and are sensitive and useful to assess the quality of OSPs. We hope our breadth study can open doors to explore the molecular diversity and dynamics of organ specificity at the protein level.


Subject(s)
Organ Specificity/genetics , Proteins/genetics , Proteome/genetics , Proteomics , Animals , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans , Mice
3.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 2347872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582891

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at risk for superadded infections, especially infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of MDR infections, including infections caused by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), was very high in Iran. This study is aimed at assessing the genetic diversity, antimicrobial resistance pattern, and biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy K. pneumoniae isolates were obtained from seventy patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in the ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran, from May to September, 2020. K. pneumoniae was detected through the ureD gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, and biofilm was detected using the microtiter plate assay method. Genetic diversity was also analyzed through polymerase chain reaction based on enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR). The BioNumerics software (v. 8.0, Applied Maths, Belgium) was used for analyzing the data and drawing dendrogram and minimum spanning tree. Findings. K. pneumoniae isolates had varying levels of resistance to antibiotics meropenem (80.4%), cefepime-aztreonam-piperacillin/tazobactam (70%), tobramycin (61.4%), ciprofloxacin (57.7%), gentamicin (55.7%), and imipenem (50%). Around 77.14% of isolates were MDR, and 42.8% of them formed biofilm. Genetic diversity analysis revealed 28 genotypes (E1-E28) and 74.28% of isolates were grouped into ten clusters (i.e., clusters A-J). Clusters were further categorized into three major clusters, i.e., clusters E, H, and J. Antimicrobial resistance to meropenem, tobramycin, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin in cluster J was significantly higher than cluster H, denoting significant relationship between ERIC clusters and antimicrobial resistance. However, there was no significant difference among major clusters E, H, and J respecting biofilm formation. Conclusion: K. pneumoniae isolates obtained from patients with COVID-19 have high antimicrobial resistance, and 44.2% of them have genetic similarity and can be clustered in three major clusters. There is a significant difference among clusters respecting antimicrobial resistance.


Subject(s)
Biofilms/growth & development , COVID-19/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Biofilms/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Iran , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 146: 112550, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588217

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus is a family of viruses that can cause diseases such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). The universal outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS coronaviruses 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a global pandemic. The ß-Coronaviruses, which caused SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), have spread in more than 213 countries, infected over 81 million people, and caused more than 1.79 million deaths. COVID-19 symptoms vary from mild fever, flu to severe pneumonia in severely ill patients. Difficult breathing, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute kidney disease, liver damage, and multi-organ failure ultimately lead to death. Researchers are working on different pre-clinical and clinical trials to prevent this deadly pandemic by developing new vaccines. Along with vaccines, therapeutic intervention is an integral part of healthcare response to address the ongoing threat posed by COVID-19. Despite the global efforts to understand and fight against COVID-19, many challenges need to be addressed. This article summarizes the current pandemic, different strains of SARS-CoV-2, etiology, complexities, surviving medications of COVID-19, and so far, vaccination for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination/trends , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/trends , Vaccination/methods
5.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 146: 112527, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559074

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a devastating impact on global populations triggered by a highly infectious viral sickness, produced by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The third major cause of mortality in the United States, following heart disease and cancer in 2020, was undoubtedly COVID-19. The centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) and the world health organization (WHO) separately developed a categorization system for differentiating new strains of SARS-CoV-2 into variants of concern (VoCs) and variants of interest (VoIs) with the continuing development of various strains SARS-CoV-2. By December 2021, five of the SARS-CoV-2 VoCs were discovered from the onset of the pandemic depending on the latest epidemiologic report by the WHO: Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), Gamma (P.1), Delta (B.1.617.2), and Omicron (B.1.1.529). Mutations in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and n-terminal domain (NTD) have been found throughout all five identified VoCs. All strains other than the delta mutant are often found with the N501Y mutation situated on the RBD, resulting in higher binding between the spike protein and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, enhanced viral adhesion, and following the entrance to host cells. The introduction of these new strains of SRAS-CoV-2 is likely to overcome the remarkable achievements gained in restricting this viral disease to the point where it is presented with remarkable vaccine developments against COVID-19 and strong worldwide mass immunization initiatives. Throughout this literature review, the effectiveness of current COVID-19 vaccines for managing and prohibiting SARS-CoV-2 strains is thoroughly described.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Genetic Vectors/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , /administration & dosage , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/metabolism , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Genetic Vectors/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/metabolism , /metabolism
6.
Microb Genom ; 7(12)2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555049

ABSTRACT

In this study, we performed genome-wide association analyses on SARS-CoV-2 genomes to identify genetic mutations associated with pre-symptomatic/asymptomatic COVID-19 cases. Various potential covariates and confounding factors of COVID-19 severity, including patient age, gender and country, as well as virus phylogenetic relatedness were adjusted for. In total, 3021 full-length genomes of SARS-CoV-2 generated from original clinical samples and whose patient status could be determined conclusively as either 'pre-symptomatic/asymptomatic' or 'symptomatic' were retrieved from the GISAID database. We found that the mutation 11 083G>T, located in the coding region of non-structural protein 6, is significantly associated with asymptomatic COVID-19. Patient age is positively correlated with symptomatic infection, while gender is not significantly correlated with the development of the disease. We also found that the effects of the mutation, patient age and gender do not vary significantly among countries, although each country appears to have varying baseline chances of COVID-19 symptom development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Genetic Variation/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Genetic , Female , Humans , Male , Odds Ratio , Open Reading Frames/genetics , Phylogeny , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
7.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554516

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some studies revealed that despite having sufficient sun exposure and dietary supply, the level of serum 25(OH)D in Bangladeshi adults is lower than its normal range. Genetic pattern of an individual is also an essential factor that regulates the level of serum 25(OH)D. However, the genetic variations of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) and their association with low serum 25(OH)D level in Bangladeshi adults are yet to be explored. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the frequency of variants of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 gene and its association with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults. METHOD: This pilot study was conducted among thirty individuals with low serum 25(OH)D level as the study population and ten subjects with sufficient serum 25(OH)D level as controls based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Genetic analysis of rs10741657 of CYP2R1 including primer designing, DNA extraction, PCR of target region with purification and Sanger sequencing of the PCR products were done accordingly. For statistical analysis, One-way ANOVA followed by LSD test, Freeman-Halton extension of Fisher's exact test, Chi-square test (χ2) test and unpaired student t-test were performed. RESULTS: In this study, genetic variants of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) among the study population were genotype GG (63.30%), GA (30%) and AA (6.7%). Minor allele frequency of the study population was 0.217. The association between GG and GA genotypes of CYP2R1 (rs10741657) with low serum 25(OH)D level among the study population was found and it was statistically significant. Statistically significant differences were also observed between the genotypes and alleles of the study population and controls. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of 'GG' and 'GA' genotypes of rs1041657 in CYP2R1 gene is associated with low serum 25(OH)D level among Bangladeshi adults in this pilot study.


Subject(s)
/genetics , Cholestanetriol 26-Monooxygenase/genetics , Cytochrome P450 Family 2/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Alleles , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Testing/methods , Genotype , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Vitamin D/blood
8.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 88-98, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544348

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) occurred in late 2019 and quickly spread all over the world. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) belongs to a genetically diverse group that mutates continuously leading to the emergence of multiple variants. Although a few antiviral agents and anti-inflammatory medicines are available, thousands of individuals have passed away due to emergence of new viral variants. Thus, proper surveillance of the SARS-CoV-2 genome is needed for the rapid identification of developing mutations over time, which are of the major concern if they occur specifically in the surface spike proteins of the virus (neutralizing analyte). This article reviews the potential mutations acquired by the SARS-CoV2 since the pandemic began and their significant impact on the neutralizing efficiency of vaccines and validity of the diagnostic assays.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genetic Drift , Genome, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Gene Frequency/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
9.
Pharmacogenomics J ; 21(6): 649-656, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526064

ABSTRACT

Chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine have been proposed as potential treatments for COVID-19. These drugs have warning labels for use in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Analysis of whole genome sequence data of 458 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa showed significant G6PD variation across the continent. We identified nine variants, of which four are potentially deleterious to G6PD function, and one (rs1050828) that is known to cause G6PD deficiency. We supplemented data for the rs1050828 variant with genotype array data from over 11,000 Africans. Although this variant is common in Africans overall, large allele frequency differences exist between sub-populations. African sub-populations in the same country can show significant differences in allele frequency (e.g. 16.0% in Tsonga vs 0.8% in Xhosa, both in South Africa, p = 2.4 × 10-3). The high prevalence of variants in the G6PD gene found in this analysis suggests that it may be a significant interaction factor in clinical trials of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for treatment of COVID-19 in Africans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency/genetics , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase/genetics , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Databases, Genetic , Genetic Variation/genetics , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency/drug therapy , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency/epidemiology , Humans , Mutation, Missense/genetics , Risk Factors
10.
Cell Rep ; 37(7): 110020, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509641

ABSTRACT

Variability in SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and COVID-19 disease severity between individuals is partly due to genetic factors. Here, we identify 4 genomic loci with suggestive associations for SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility and 19 for COVID-19 disease severity. Four of these 23 loci likely have an ethnicity-specific component. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in 11 loci colocalize with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) associated with the expression of 20 genes in 62 tissues/cell types (range: 1:43 tissues/gene), including lung, brain, heart, muscle, and skin as well as the digestive system and immune system. We perform genetic fine mapping to compute 99% credible SNP sets, which identify 10 GWAS loci that have eight or fewer SNPs in the credible set, including three loci with one single likely causal SNP. Our study suggests that the diverse symptoms and disease severity of COVID-19 observed between individuals is associated with variants across the genome, affecting gene expression levels in a wide variety of tissue types.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Humans , Organ Specificity/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome/genetics
11.
Virus Res ; 307: 198618, 2022 01 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504602

ABSTRACT

The second wave of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS-CoV-2) is rapidly spreading over the world. Mechanisms behind the flee from current antivirals are still unclear due to the continuous occurrence of SARS-CoV-2 genetic variants. Brazil is the world's second-most COVID-19 affected country. In the present study, we identified the genomic and proteomic variants of Brazilian SARS-CoV-2 isolates. We identified 16 different genotypic variants were found among the 27 isolates. The genotypes of three isolates such as Bra/1236/2021 (G15), Bra/MASP2C844R2/2020 (G11), and Bra/RJ-DCVN5/2020 (G9) have a unique mutant in NSP4 (S184N), 2'O-Mutase (R216N), membrane protein (A2V) and Envelope protein (V5A). A mutation in RdRp of SARS-CoV-2, particularly the change of Pro-to Leu-at 323 resulted in the stabilization of the structure in BRA/CD1739-P4/2020. NSP4, NSP5 protein mutants are more virulent in genotype 15 and 16. A fast protein folding rate changes the structural stability and leads to escape for current antivirals. Thus, our findings help researchers to develop the best potent antivirals based on the new mutant of Brazilian isolates.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Protein Folding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Brazil , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Phosphoproteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virulence/genetics
12.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(20): 6411-6424, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503073

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The heterogeneity of clinical manifestations and mortality rates in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients may be related to the existence of molecular subtypes in COVID-19. To improve current management, it is essential to find the hub genes and pathways associated with different COVID-19 subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The whole-genome sequencing information (GSE156063, GSE163151) of nasopharyngeal swabs from normal subjects and COVID-19 patients were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The molecular subtypes of patients with COVID-19 were classified using the "consistent clustering" method, and the specific genes associated with each subtype were found. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened between normal subjects and COVID-19 patients; the Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) method was used to find the key module genes of COVID-19 patients. Subtype-specific, differentially expressed and module-related genes were collected and intersected. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis were carried out and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were generated. The pathways enriched in COVID-19 subtypes were analyzed by gene set variation analysis (GSVA). RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 were divided into three subtypes, and there was no significant difference in gender and age distribution between subtypes. 82 differential gene pathways were screened between Subtypes I and II, 131 differential gene pathways were screened between Subtypes I and III, and 107 differential gene pathways were screened between Subtypes II and III. Finally, 44 differentially expressed key genes were screened, including 11 hub genes (RSAD2, IFIT1, MX1, OAS1, OAS2, BST2, IFI27, IFI35, IFI6, IFITM3, STAT2). CONCLUSIONS: There are significant differences in gene activation and pathway enrichment among different molecular subtypes of COVID-19, which may account for the heterogeneity in clinical presentation and the prognosis of patients.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans
13.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481008

ABSTRACT

Measles virus (MeV) genotype B3 is one globally significant circulating genotype. Here, we present a systematic description of long-term evolutionary characterizations of the MeV genotype B3's hemagglutinin (H) gene in the elimination era. Our results show that the B3 H gene can be divided into two main sub-genotypes, and the highest intra-genotypic diversity was observed in 2004. MeV genotype B3's H gene diverged in 1976; its overall nucleotide substitution rate is estimated to be 5.697 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year, and is slowing down. The amino acid substitution rate of genotype B3's H gene is also decreasing, and the mean effective population size has been in a downward trend since 2000. Selection pressure analysis only recognized a few sites under positive selection, and the number of positive selection sites is getting smaller. All of these observations may reveal that genotype B3's H gene is not under strong selection pressure, and is becoming increasingly conservative. MeV H-gene or whole-genome sequencing should be routine, so as to better elucidate the molecular epidemiology of MeV in the future.


Subject(s)
Hemagglutinins, Viral/genetics , Measles virus/genetics , China , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genotype , Hemagglutinins/genetics , Humans , Measles/virology , Molecular Epidemiology/methods , Phylogeny , Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(13): e25265, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455403

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Complement deficiency are known to be predisposed to disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI). We herein present a case of DGI involving a Japanese man who latently had a complement 7 deficiency with compound heterozygous variants. PATIENT CONCERNS: A previously healthy 51-year-old Japanese man complained of sudden-onset high fever. Physical examination revealed various skin lesions including red papules on his trunk and extremities, an impetigo-like pustule on left forearm, and tendinitis of his right forefinger. DIAGNOSIS: Blood culture testing detected gram-negative cocci, which was confirmed to be Neisseria gonorrhoeae based on mass spectrometry and a pathogen-specific PCR test. INTERVENTIONS: Screening tests for underlying immunocompromised factors uncovered that complement activities (CH50) was undetectable. With a suspicion of a congenital complement deficiency, genetic analysis revealed rare single nucleotide variants in complement 7 (C7), including c.281-1G>T and a novel variant c.1454C>T (p.A485V). CH50 was normally recovered by adding purified human C7 to the patient's serum, supporting that the patient has C7 deficiency with compound heterozygous variants. OUTCOMES: Under a diagnosis of DGI, the patient underwent an antibiotic treatment with cefotaxime for a week and was discharged without any sequela. LESSONS: DGI is a rare sexually-transmitted infection that potentially induces systemic complications. Complement immunity usually defeats N. gonorrhoeae and prevents the organism from causing DGI. This case highlighted the importance of suspecting a complement deficiency when a person develops DGI.


Subject(s)
Complement C7/deficiency , Genetic Variation/genetics , Gonorrhea/genetics , Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases/genetics , Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases/microbiology , Neisseria gonorrhoeae , Complement C7/genetics , Female , Gonorrhea/microbiology , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged
16.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0258019, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443854

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage across the globe and take millions of lives and like many parts of the world, the second wave of the pandemic hit Bangladesh, this study aimed at understanding its causative agent, SARS-CoV-2 at the genomic and proteomic level and provide precious insights about the pathogenesis, evolution, strengths and weaknesses of the virus. As of Mid-June 2021, over 1500 SARS-CoV-2 genomesequences have been deposited in the GISAID database from Bangladesh which were extracted and categorized into two waves. By analyzing these genome sequences, it was discovered that the wave-2 samples had a significantly greater average rate of mutation/sample (30.79%) than the wave-1 samples (12.32%). Wave-2 samples also had a higher frequency of deletion, and transversion events. During the first wave, the GR clade was the most predominant but it was replaced by the GH clade in the latter wave. The B.1.1.25 variant showed the highest frequency in wave-1 while in case of wave-2, the B.1.351.3 variant, was the most common one. A notable presence of the delta variant, which is currently at the center of concern, was also observed. Comparison of the Spike protein found in the reference and the 3 most common lineages found in Bangladesh namely, B.1.1.7, B.1.351, B.1.617 in terms of their ability to form stable complexes with ACE2 receptor revealed that B.1.617 had the potential to be more transmissible than others. Importantly, no indigenous variants have been detected so far which implies that the successful prevention of import of foreign variants can diminish the outbreak in the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genomics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Mutation/genetics , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
17.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441884

ABSTRACT

Bats have been identified as natural reservoirs of a variety of coronaviruses. They harbor at least 19 of the 33 defined species of alpha- and betacoronaviruses. Previously, the bat coronavirus HKU10 was found in two bat species of different suborders, Rousettus leschenaultia and Hipposideros pomona, in south China. However, its geographic distribution and evolution history are not fully investigated. Here, we screened this viral species by a nested reverse transcriptase PCR in our archived samples collected over 10 years from 25 provinces of China and one province of Laos. From 8004 bat fecal samples, 26 were found to be positive for bat coronavirus HKU10 (BtCoV HKU10). New habitats of BtCoV HKU10 were found in the Yunnan, Guangxi, and Hainan Provinces of China, and Louang Namtha Province in Laos. In addition to H. pomona, BtCoV HKU10 variants were found circulating in Aselliscus stoliczkanus and Hipposideros larvatus. We sequenced full-length genomes of 17 newly discovered BtCoV HKU10 strains and compared them with previously published sequences. Our results revealed a much higher genetic diversity of BtCoV HKU10, particularly in spike genes and accessory genes. Besides the two previously reported lineages, we found six novel lineages in their new habitats, three of which were located in Yunnan province. The genotypes of these viruses are closely related to sampling locations based on polyproteins, and correlated to bat species based on spike genes. Combining phylogenetic analysis, selective pressure, and molecular-clock calculation, we demonstrated that Yunnan bats harbor a gene pool of BtCoV HKU10, with H. pomona as a natural reservoir. The cell tropism test using spike-pseudotyped lentivirus system showed that BtCoV HKU10 could enter cells from human and bat, suggesting a potential interspecies spillover. Continuous studies on these bat coronaviruses will expand our understanding of the evolution and genetic diversity of coronaviruses, and provide a prewarning of potential zoonotic diseases from bats.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Base Sequence/genetics , Biological Evolution , China , Chiroptera/genetics , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Variation/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Genotype , Phylogeny , Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods , Viral Proteins/genetics
18.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 688071, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399132

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection continues to scale and threaten human health and public safety. It is essential to identify those risk factors that lead to a poor prognosis of the disease. A predisposing host genetic background could be one of these factors that explain the interindividual variability to COVID-19 severity. Thus, we have studied whether the rs4341 and rs4343 polymorphisms of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene, key regulator of the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system (RAAS), could explain the different outcomes of 128 COVID-19 patients with diverse degree of severity (33 asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, 66 hospitalized in the general ward, and 29 admitted to the ICU). We found that G allele of rs4341 and rs4343 was associated with severe COVID-19 in hypertensive patients, independently of gender (p<0.05). G-carrier genotypes of both polymorphisms were also associated with higher mortality (p< 0.05) and higher severity of COVID-19 in dyslipidemic (p<0.05) and type 2 diabetic patients (p< 0.01). The association of G alleles with disease severity was adjusted for age, sex, BMI and number of comorbidities, suggesting that both the metabolic comorbidities and the G allele act synergistically on COVID-19 outcome. Although we did not find a direct association between serum ACE levels and COVID-19 severity, we found higher levels of ACE in the serum of patients with the GG genotype of rs4341 and rs4343 (p<0.05), what could explain the higher susceptibility to develop severe forms of the disease in patients with the GG genotype, in addition to hypertension and dyslipidemia. In conclusion, our preliminary study suggests that the G-containing genotypes of rs4341 and rs4343 confer an additional risk of adverse COVID-19 prognosis. Thus, rs4341 and rs4343 polymorphisms of ACE could be predictive markers of severity of COVID-19 in those patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetes. The knowledge of these genetic data could contribute to precision management of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients when admitted to hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Dyslipidemias/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , Hypertension/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Dyslipidemias/diagnosis , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology
20.
Genomics ; 113(4): 1628-1638, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386752

ABSTRACT

Sequencing the SARS-CoV-2 genome from clinical samples can be challenging, especially in specimens with low viral titer. Here we report Accurate SARS-CoV-2 genome Reconstruction (ACoRE), an amplicon-based viral genome sequencing workflow for the complete and accurate reconstruction of SARS-CoV-2 sequences from clinical samples, including suboptimal ones that would usually be excluded even if unique and irreplaceable. The protocol was optimized to improve flexibility and the combination of technical replicates was established as the central strategy to achieve accurate analysis of low-titer/suboptimal samples. We demonstrated the utility of the approach by achieving complete genome reconstruction and the identification of false-positive variants in >170 clinical samples, thus avoiding the generation of inaccurate and/or incomplete sequences. Most importantly, ACoRE was crucial to identify the correct viral strain responsible of a relapse case, that would be otherwise mis-classified as a re-infection due to missing or incorrect variant identification by a standard workflow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Reinfection/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Genetic Variation/genetics , Humans , Reinfection/pathology , Reinfection/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Whole Genome Sequencing
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