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1.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 32(5): 583-589, 2022 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Despite increased participation of women in academic medicine in recent decades, gender disparities persist. The gender gap in authorship and editorial boards in gynecologic oncology, and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, have not been recently evaluated. We examined gender representation and the impact of COVID-19 on authorship and editorial boards of two major peer-reviewed gynecologic oncology journals. METHODS: We conducted a bibliometric analysis of original articles published in Gynecologic Oncology and the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, comparing the most contemporary 5-year period (2016-2020) to single years in the two prior decades (1996, 2006). To assess the early impact of COVID-19, we compared publications from May 2020-April 2021 to 2019. Editorial boards were analyzed for gender composition. First names, pronouns, and institutional photographs were used to determine gender. RESULTS: There were 3022 original articles published between 2016 and 2020, 763 in 2006, and 203 in 1996. Gender was identified for 91.3% of first authors (3641 articles) and 95.6% of senior authors (3813 articles). Men comprised the majority of the editorial boards in 2021 at 57% and 61% for Gynecologic Oncology and the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, respectively. Men were overrepresented as senior authors across all study periods: 93% in 1996, 77% in 2006, and 58% in 2016-2020. Over time, representation of women as first and senior authors increased (7% in 1996, 42% in 2016-2020, p<0.00001). There was no immediate impact of the early pandemic on gender distribution of authorship. CONCLUSIONS: Despite greater representation of women over time as authors in gynecologic oncology journals, there remains gender disparity in senior authorship and editorial board representation. This presents an opportunity for the academic publishing community to advocate for deliberate strategies to achieve gender parity. Although no impact of the early COVID-19 pandemic was found, this requires ongoing surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Authorship , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sexism
2.
Oncologist ; 27(6): 512-515, 2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1746264

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to assess gynecologic cancer survivor preferences for telehealth cancer care. Gynecologic cancer survivors participating in a prospective cohort study were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey regarding their experience with and preferences for telehealth. Of 188 participants, 48.9% had undergone a telehealth visit since March 2020, and 53.7% reported a preference for exclusively in-person visits for their cancer care and surveillance. Furthermore, 80.5% of participants were satisfied with the telehealth care they received and 54.8% would recommend telehealth services to patients with similar conditions. Most participants thought a physical examination was critical to detecting recurrence, and concern that their provider may miss something during telehealth visits was greater among those who preferred in-person visits. With many gynecologic cancer survivors preferring in-person care, building a future care model that includes telehealth elements will require adaptations, careful evaluation of patient concerns, as well as patient education on telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , Prospective Studies , Survivors
3.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 155 Suppl 1: 123-134, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575902

ABSTRACT

Despite the evidence supporting the relevance of obesity and obesity-associated disorders in the development, management, and prognosis of various cancers, obesity rates continue to increase worldwide. Growing evidence supports the involvement of obesity in the development of gynecologic malignancies. This article explores the molecular basis governing the alteration of hallmarks of cancer in the development of obesity-related gynecologic malignancies encompassing cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. We highlight specific examples of how development, management, and prognosis are affected for each cancer, incorporate current knowledge on complementary approaches including lifestyle interventions to improve patient outcomes, and highlight how new technologies are helping us better understand the biology underlying this neglected pandemic.


Subject(s)
Endometrial Neoplasms , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Ovarian Neoplasms , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/etiology
5.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 32(1): 9-14, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526516

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, pressures on clinical services required adaptation to how care was prioritised and delivered for women with gynecological cancer. This document discusses potential 'salvage' measures when treatment has deviated from the usual standard of care. The British Gynaecological Cancer Society convened a multidisciplinary working group to develop recommendations for the onward management and follow-up of women with gynecological cancer who have been impacted by a change in treatment during the pandemic. These recommendations are presented for each tumor type and for healthcare systems, and the impact on gynecological services are discussed. It will be important that patient concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on their cancer pathway are acknowledged and addressed for their ongoing care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Female , Gynecology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 355-359, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286604

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the most recent evidence on gynecologic cancer disparities and to describe studies investigating the social determinants of health and receipt of evidence-based care and potential interventions to address inequities in care. RECENT FINDINGS: Significant disparities in disease-specific survival by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and payer status have persisted in women with gynecologic cancers. Compared with white women, black women have an increased likelihood of disease-specific mortality for endometrial cancer and are less likely to receive guideline-adherent care for ovarian cancer. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought significant attention to the structural barriers that contribute to persistent health disparities and how community-based partnerships with a focus on policy interventions are needed for equitable gynecologic cancer outcomes. SUMMARY: In this review, we discuss structural barriers contributing to racial inequities, the role of Medicaid payer status and receipt of quality cancer care, gender, and racial workforce diversity, and community-based partnerships to create evidence-based interventions to address disparities.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Healthcare Disparities , Minority Groups , Female , Humans , Medicaid , Quality of Health Care , United States/epidemiology
7.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(3): 679-686, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248724

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 has captured the world. We hypothesized that this pandemic reduced referral of other non-COVID-19 patients to the hospitals or clinics, including gynecological and perinatological referrals. Women can be at risk in limited use of health services. METHODS: In this retrospective study, referrals from gynecologic oncology, perinatology, and gynecology clinics in a large teaching hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) were compared from February 20 to May 20, 2020, with the same period in 2019. Finally, referral trends in 2020 were compared with the COVID-19 admission pattern. RESULTS: Total admissions to all three clinics declined 63% in 2020 compared to 2019. There was a significant relationship between the number of visits to three clinics during these2  years (p < 0.001). The reduction in referrals to the gynecology clinic was more than gynecologic oncology and perinatology. The COVID-19 referral pattern was conversely linked to gynecology-related admissions. CONCLUSION: As the pandemic situation makes patients hesitant to go to the hospitals or not, health policymakers should consider other non-COVID issues, including maternal and fetal concerns. Providing safe places for other patients to visit is a goal that can be achieved through developing guidelines for nosocomial hygiene and training informed healthcare staff. Moreover, non-urgent visits should be avoided or postponed. This issue calls for new strategies, including telemedicine in situations similar to the current pandemic to both identify and manage such conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Perinatology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Maternity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 50(8): 102133, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157518

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has put tremendous pressure on the French healthcare system. Almost all hospital departments have had to profoundly modify their activity to cope with the crisis. In this context, the surgical management of cancers has been a topic of debate as care strategies were tailored to avoid any delay in treatment that could be detrimental to patient wellbeing while being careful not to overload intensive care units. The primary objective of this study was to observe changes in the surgical management of pelvic cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic in France. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study analyzed data from the prospective multi-center cohort study conducted by the French Society for Pelvic and Gynecological Surgery (SCGP) with methodological support from the French (FRANCOGYN) Group. All members of the SCGP received by e-mail a link allowing them to include patients who were scheduled to undergo gynecological carcinologic surgery between March 16th 2020 and May 11th 2020. Demographic data, the characteristics of cancers and the impact of the crisis in terms of changes to the usual recommended coarse of care were collected. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients with a median age 63 years were included in the cohort. In total, 31 patients had cervical cancer, 76 patients had endometrial cancer, 52 patients had ovarian or tubal cancer, 5 patients had a borderline tumor of the ovary, and 17 patients had vulvar cancer. During the study period, the care strategy was changed for 49 (27%) patients with postponed for 35 (19.3%) patients, and canceled for 7 (3.9%) patients. Surgical treatment was maintained for 139 (76.8%) patients. Management with neoadjuvant chemotherapy was offered to 19 (10,5%) patients and a change in surgical choice was made for 5 (2,8%) patients. In total, 8 (4,4%) patients tested positive for COVID-19. Data also shows a greater number of therapeutic changes in cases of ovarian cancer as well as a cancelation of a lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy in one patient with cervical cancer. Hospital consultants estimated a direct detrimental impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for 39 patients, representing 22% of gynecological cancers. CONCLUSION: This study provided observational data of the impact of the COVID-19 health crisis on the surgical management of gynecological cancers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Databases, Factual , Female , France/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/classification , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Bull Cancer ; 108(1): 3-11, 2021 Jan.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996708

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the containment measures and the recommendations of several societies in oncology may have impacted the request for initial care for cancers. METHODS: In this monocentric retrospective study, the number and the characteristics of patients received for a first consultation for a breast or gynecologic tumor were compared between the containment period and a control period. The times from diagnosis to treatment and the type of initial care were compared too. RESULTS: During the outbreak, 91 patients were seen for a new request, versus 159 during the control period, a decrease of 43.5 %. Patients were older (62.9 versus 60.9 years old) but this difference was not significant. Tumor stage was not modified. Concerning senology, the time from the biopsy to the first consultation was 5.5 days longer during the outbreak (difference statistically insignificant). Among the 51 patients requiring a surgical treatment during the outbreak, 16 (31.48 %) were postponed after the end of the containment measures. After all, the average time from the consultation to the treatment was not modified. No modification of type of treatment was observed. DISCUSSION: At the height of the pandemic, benefits and risks of the cancer treatment had to be daily balanced against the risk of exposition to the COVID-19. The evaluation of practices for cancer care is essential to understand the real impact of COVID-19 outbreak on global cancer management, so as to get prepared to further crises.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Chi-Square Distribution , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Humans , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Retrospective Studies , Statistics, Nonparametric , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data
11.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 30(11): 1667-1671, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 16, 2020, the federal government of Austria declared a nationwide lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the lockdown, screening examinations and routine checkups have been restricted to prevent the spread of the virus and to increase the hospitals' bed capacity across the country. This resulted in a severe decline of patient referrals to the hospitals. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rate of newly diagnosed gynecological and breast cancers in Austria. METHODS: Data of 2077 patients from 18 centers in Austria with newly diagnosed gynecological or breast cancer between January and May 2019 and January and May 2020 were collected. Clinical parameters, including symptoms, performance status, co-morbidities, and referral status, were compared between the time before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. RESULTS: Our results showed a slight increase of newly diagnosed cancers in January and February 2020 as compared with 2019 (+2 and +35%, respectively) and a strong decline in newly diagnosed tumors since the lockdown: -24% in March 2020 versus March 2019, -49% in April 2020 versus April 2019, -49% in May 2020 versus May 2019. Two-thirds of patients diagnosed during the pandemic presented with tumor-specific symptoms compared with less than 50% before the pandemic (p<0.001). Moreover, almost 50% of patients in 2020 had no co-morbidities compared with 35% in 2019 (p<0.001). Patients, who already had a malignant disease, were rarely diagnosed with a new cancer in 2020 as compared with 2019 (11% vs 6%; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The lockdown led to a decreased number of newly diagnosed gynecological and breast cancers. The decreased accessibility of the medical services and postponed diagnosis of potentially curable cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic may be a step backwards in our healthcare system and might impair cancer treatment outcomes. Therefore, new strategies to manage early cancer detection are needed to optimize cancer care in a time of pandemic in the future.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Austria/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
12.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(6): 914-919, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835512

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted the management of patients with gynecologic cancers. Many centers have reduced access to routine visits to avoid crowded waiting areas and specially to reduce the infection risk for oncologic patients. The goal of this review is to propose a surveillance algorithm for patients with gynecologic cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic based on existing evidence and established guidelines. It is time to consider strategies based on telemedicine and to adapt protocols in this new era. We hereby propose a strategy for routine surveillance both during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods , Algorithms , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol ; 48(11): 777-783, 2020 11.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812177

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The exceptional health situation related to the SARS-Cov2 coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) required a deep and very quickly adaptation of management practices in gynecological cancer. The main objective is to estimate the proportion of patients with treatment modifications. METHOD: This is a multicenter prospective study conducted in 3 university gynecological cancer departments (HCLyon, France) during the period of confinement (March 16 to May 11, 2020). All patients with non-metastatic breast cancer or gynecological cancer were included. The planned treatment, postponement, delay and organizational modifications (RCP, teleconsultations) were studied. RESULTS: Two hundred and five consecutive patients were included, average age 60.5±1.0. 7 patients (3.4%) had SARS-Cov-2 infection, 2 patients died. One hundred and twenty-two patients (59.5%) had a treatment maintained, 72 patients (35.1%) postponed, 11 patients (5.4%) cancelled. Of the 115 (56.1%) planned surgeries, 40 (34.8%) postponed, 7 cancelled (6.1%). 9 patients (7.8%) had a surgical modification. Of the 59 (28.8%) radiotherapy treatments scheduled, 24 (40.7%) postponed and 2 (3.4%) cancelled. Of the 56 (27.3%) chemotherapy treatment planned, 8 (14.3%) postponed and 2 (3.6%) cancelled. One hundred and forty-five patients (70.7%) have been discussed in multidisciplinary meeting. One hundred and fifty-eight patients (77%) had a teleconsultation system. CONCLUSION: Our study assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on therapeutic management of patients with gynecological cancer during the period of confinement. This will probably improve our management of an eventual epidemic rebound or future health crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Antineoplastic Agents , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , France/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Radiotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data
14.
Cancer ; 126(19): 4294-4303, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New York City (NYC) is the epicenter of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) in the United States. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of vulnerable populations, such as those with gynecologic cancer who develop COVID-19 infections, is limited. METHODS: Patients from 6 NYC-area hospital systems with known gynecologic cancer and a COVID-19 diagnosis were identified. Demographic and clinical outcome data were abstracted through a review of electronic medical records. RESULTS: Records for 121 patients with gynecologic cancer and COVID-19 were abstracted; the median age at the COVID-19 diagnosis was 64.0 years (interquartile range, 51.0-73.0 years). Sixty-six of the 121 patients (54.5%) required hospitalization; among the hospitalized patients, 45 (68.2%) required respiratory intervention, 20 (30.3%) were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 9 (13.6%) underwent invasive mechanical ventilation. Seventeen patients (14.0%) died of COVID-19 complications. No patient requiring mechanical ventilation survived. On multivariable analysis, hospitalization was associated with an age ≥64 years (risk ratio [RR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.51), African American race (RR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.13-2.15), and 3 or more comorbidities (RR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.03-1.98). Only recent immunotherapy use (RR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.08-11.27) was associated with death due to COVID-19 on multivariable analysis; chemotherapy treatment and recent major surgery were not predictive of COVID-19 severity or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The case fatality rate among gynecologic oncology patients with a COVID-19 infection is 14.0%. Recent immunotherapy use is associated with an increased risk of mortality related to COVID-19 infection. LAY SUMMARY: The case fatality rate among gynecologic oncology patients with a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is 14.0%; there is no association between cytotoxic chemotherapy and cancer-directed surgery and COVID-19 severity or death. As such, patients can be counseled regarding the safety of continued anticancer treatments during the pandemic. This is important because the ability to continue cancer therapies for cancer control and cure is critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Comorbidity , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunotherapy , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , New York City , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
15.
ESMO Open ; 5(Suppl 3)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688771

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and its related disease (COVID-19) has required an immediate and coordinate healthcare response to face the worldwide emergency and define strategies to maintain the continuum of care for the non-COVID-19 diseases while protecting patients and healthcare providers. The dimension of the COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk especially for the more vulnerable populations. To manage patients with cancer adequately, maintaining the highest quality of care, a definition of value-based priorities is necessary to define which interventions can be safely postponed without affecting patients' outcome. The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has endorsed a tiered approach across three different levels of priority (high, medium, low) incorporating information on the value-based prioritisation and clinical cogency of the interventions that can be applied for different disease sites. Patients with gynaecological cancer are at particular risk of COVID-19 complications because of their age and prevalence of comorbidities. The definition of priority level should be based on tumour stage and histology, cancer-related symptoms or complications, aim (curative vs palliative) and magnitude of benefit of the oncological intervention, patients' general condition and preferences. The decision-making process always needs to consider the disease-specific national and international guidelines and the local healthcare system and social resources, and a changing situation in relation to COVID-19 infection. These recommendations aim to provide guidance for the definition of deferrable and undeferrable interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic for ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancers within the context of the ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Medical Oncology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Endometrial Neoplasms/diagnosis , Endometrial Neoplasms/epidemiology , Endometrial Neoplasms/therapy , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy
17.
Gynecol Oncol ; 158(2): 262-265, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592398

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is continuing to spread. There are growing concerns on the impact of COVID-19 in cancer patients. Several papers reporting recommendations and guidelines are published. But few data on cancer patients affected by COVID-19 are available. METHODS: This is a retrospective study including all consecutive patients affected by gynecological cancer who developed COVID-19. All patients were treated in an academic setting (in Milan, Lombardy, Italy) between February and March 2020. RESULTS: Overall, 355 patients had active treatment during the study period due to newly diagnosed or recurrent gynecological disease. Among those, 19 (5.3%) patients affected developed COVID-19. All patients were asymptomatic at the time of COVID-19 detection. Six patients were diagnosed before starting planned treatments; while the remaining 13 were diagnosed for COVID-19 after their started their treatments. Considering the first group of six patients, one patient died due to COVID-19 3 days after the diagnosis; while the other patients recovered from COVID-19 after a median of three weeks. The latter group of 13 patients (treatments started) included five patients who underwent surgery and eight patients who underwent chemotherapy. Focusing on five patients who were diagnosed after surgery, we observed that two patients died during postoperative course, while in other two cases prolonged hospitalization was needed. One patient had no issues. Chemotherapy was delayed for the remaining patents without sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Our report highlights that COVID-19 impacts the quality of treatments for cancer patients. Mortality rate is high, especially after surgery. More important, patients under active treatment for cancer are at high risk of developing severe evolution of COVID-19. Prioritizing patients journey during COVID-19 is of paramount importance.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Gynecol Oncol ; 31(4): e68, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-382022

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has rapidly spread globally. Cancer patients are at a higher risk of being infected with the coronavirus and are more likely to develop severe complications, as compared to the general population. The increasing spread of COVID-19 presents challenges for the clinical care of patients with gynecological malignancies. Concerted efforts should be put into managing gynecological malignancies in an orderly manner by strictly implementing the measures that are specifically developed for controlling the spread of COVID-19. We have drafted Recommendations on Management of Gynecological Malignancies during the COVID-19 Pandemic based on our experience on controlling COVID-19 pandemic in China. We recommend that patients with gynecological malignancies should be managed in hierarchical and individualized manners in combination with local conditions related to COVID-19. Medical care decision should be balanced between controlling COVID-19 pandemic spread and timely diagnosis and treatment for gynecologic oncology patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Gynecology/standards , Health Planning Guidelines , Humans , Oncologists/standards , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Gynecol Oncol ; 31(4): e72, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-381768

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) classified the novel coronavirus (i.e., coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) as a global public health emergency. COVID-19 threatens to curtail patient access to evidence-based treatment. Medicine is changing, basically due to the limited available resources. In the field of gynecologic oncology, we have to re-design our treatments' paradigm. During COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, the highest priority is to achieve the maximum benefit from less demanding procedures. Extensive procedures should be avoided, in order to reduce hospitalization and postoperative events that might increase the in-hospital spread of the virus. There are ongoing concerns on the use of laparoscopic procedures, related to the possible contamination of the staff working in the operation room. Other minimally invasive techniques, including, vaginal surgery as well as robotic-assisted and isobaric procedures would be preferred over laparoscopy. A fair allocation of resources is paramount adequate treatments.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Guidelines as Topic , Gynecology/standards , Humans , Oncologists/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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