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3.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 32(5): 583-589, 2022 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Despite increased participation of women in academic medicine in recent decades, gender disparities persist. The gender gap in authorship and editorial boards in gynecologic oncology, and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, have not been recently evaluated. We examined gender representation and the impact of COVID-19 on authorship and editorial boards of two major peer-reviewed gynecologic oncology journals. METHODS: We conducted a bibliometric analysis of original articles published in Gynecologic Oncology and the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, comparing the most contemporary 5-year period (2016-2020) to single years in the two prior decades (1996, 2006). To assess the early impact of COVID-19, we compared publications from May 2020-April 2021 to 2019. Editorial boards were analyzed for gender composition. First names, pronouns, and institutional photographs were used to determine gender. RESULTS: There were 3022 original articles published between 2016 and 2020, 763 in 2006, and 203 in 1996. Gender was identified for 91.3% of first authors (3641 articles) and 95.6% of senior authors (3813 articles). Men comprised the majority of the editorial boards in 2021 at 57% and 61% for Gynecologic Oncology and the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, respectively. Men were overrepresented as senior authors across all study periods: 93% in 1996, 77% in 2006, and 58% in 2016-2020. Over time, representation of women as first and senior authors increased (7% in 1996, 42% in 2016-2020, p<0.00001). There was no immediate impact of the early pandemic on gender distribution of authorship. CONCLUSIONS: Despite greater representation of women over time as authors in gynecologic oncology journals, there remains gender disparity in senior authorship and editorial board representation. This presents an opportunity for the academic publishing community to advocate for deliberate strategies to achieve gender parity. Although no impact of the early COVID-19 pandemic was found, this requires ongoing surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Authorship , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sexism
4.
Oncologist ; 27(6): 512-515, 2022 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1746264

ABSTRACT

Our objective was to assess gynecologic cancer survivor preferences for telehealth cancer care. Gynecologic cancer survivors participating in a prospective cohort study were invited to complete a cross-sectional survey regarding their experience with and preferences for telehealth. Of 188 participants, 48.9% had undergone a telehealth visit since March 2020, and 53.7% reported a preference for exclusively in-person visits for their cancer care and surveillance. Furthermore, 80.5% of participants were satisfied with the telehealth care they received and 54.8% would recommend telehealth services to patients with similar conditions. Most participants thought a physical examination was critical to detecting recurrence, and concern that their provider may miss something during telehealth visits was greater among those who preferred in-person visits. With many gynecologic cancer survivors preferring in-person care, building a future care model that includes telehealth elements will require adaptations, careful evaluation of patient concerns, as well as patient education on telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , Prospective Studies , Survivors
5.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 31(2): e13562, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685282

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of gynaecological cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic from their own perspectives. METHODS: The study is a descriptive study with a qualitative design based on thematic analysis. We conducted the study with 17 women with gynaecological cancer and receiving chemotherapy in the Medical Oncology and Chemotherapy Unit of Kütahya Training and Research Hospital. The data were collected between April 2021 and May 2021 via an in-depth individual interview form. The COREQ checklist was followed in the study. RESULTS: As a result of the interviews, we identified four main themes: the impacts of COVID-19 on life, the impact of COVID-19 on cancer treatment, the biggest fear during the COVID-19 pandemic and the metaphors of struggling with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The disruption of treatment services during the COVID-19 pandemic and women's fear of infection by the virus led to delays in cancer diagnosis and treatment. This situation caused the women's state of health to deteriorate, and the resultant regret and sadness that they experienced had an adverse effect on their mental health. Furthermore, women's self-isolation due to the fear of infection by the virus had a negative effect on their psychosocial health. Telehealth services should be provided for cancer patients to obtain accurate information and to easily access information about treatment processes during the pandemic, and telepsychological hotlines and peer support groups should be established to improve the psychosocial health of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(23): 24943-24962, 2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622953

ABSTRACT

Ongoing pandemic and potential resurgence of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has prompted urgent efforts to investigate the immunological memory of convalescent patients, especially in patients with active cancers. Here we performed single-cell RNA sequencing in peripheral blood samples of 3 healthy donors (HDs), 4 COVID-19 patients (Covs) and 4 COVID-19 patients with active gynecological tumor (TCs) pre- and post- anti-tumor treatment. All Covs patients had recovered from their acute infection. Interestingly, the molecular features of PBMCs in TCs are similar to that in Covs, suggesting that convalescent COVID-19 with gynecologic tumors do not have major immunological changes and may be protected against reinfection similar to COVID-19 patients without tumors. Moreover, the chemotherapy given to these patients mainly caused neutropenia, while having little effect on the proportion and functional phenotype of T and B cells, and T cell clonal expansion. Notably, anti-PD-L1 treatment massively increased cytotoxic scores of NK cells, and T cells, and facilitated clonal expansion of T cells in these patients. It is likely that T cells could protect patients from SARS-CoV-2 virus reinfection and anti-PD-L1 treatment can enhance the anti-viral activity of the T cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/drug effects , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/immunology , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
7.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 155 Suppl 1: 94-101, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575396

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant reconfiguration of gynecologic cancer services and care pathways across the globe, with a transformation of working practices. Services had to adapt to protect their vulnerable patients from infection, whilst providing care despite reduced resources/capacity and staffing. The international gynecologic cancer community introduced modified clinical care guidelines. Remote working, reduced hospital visiting, routine COVID-testing, and use of COVID-free surgical areas/hubs enabled the ongoing and safe delivery of complex cancer care, with priority levels for cancer treatments established to guide decision-making by multidisciplinary tumor boards. Some 2.3 million cancer surgeries were delayed or cancelled during the first peak, with many patients reporting significant anxiety/concern for cancer progression and COVID infection. Although COVID trials were prioritized, recruitment to other cancer trials/research activity was significantly reduced. The impact of resultant protocol deviations on outcomes remains to be established. During the recovery healthcare services must maintain capacity and flexibility to manage future surges of infection, address the large backlog of patients with altered or delayed treatments, along with salvaging screening and prevention services. Training needs/mental well-being of trainees need addressing and staff burnout prevented. Future research needs to fully evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on long-term patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Gynecol Oncol ; 164(2): 304-310, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite significant increase in COVID-19 publications, characterization of COVID-19 infection in patients with gynecologic cancer remains limited. Here we present an update of COVID-19 outcomes among people with gynecologic cancer in New York City (NYC) during the initial surge of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]). METHODS: Data were abstracted from gynecologic oncology patients with COVID-19 infection among 8 NYC area hospital systems between March and June 2020. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate associations between factors and COVID-19 related hospitalization and mortality. RESULTS: Of 193 patients with gynecologic cancer and COVID-19, the median age at diagnosis was 65.0 years (interquartile range (IQR), 53.0-73.0 years). One hundred six of the 193 patients (54.9%) required hospitalization; among the hospitalized patients, 13 (12.3%) required invasive mechanical ventilation, 39 (36.8%) required ICU admission. Half of the cohort (49.2%) had not received anti-cancer treatment prior to COVID-19 diagnosis. No patients requiring mechanical ventilation survived. Thirty-four of 193 (17.6%) patients died of COVID-19 complications. In multivariable analysis, hospitalization was associated with an age ≥ 65 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11, 4.07), Black race (OR 2.53, CI 1.24, 5.32), performance status ≥2 (OR 3.67, CI 1.25, 13.55) and ≥ 3 comorbidities (OR 2.00, CI 1.05, 3.84). Only former or current history of smoking (OR 2.75, CI 1.21, 6.22) was associated with death due to COVID-19 in multivariable analysis. Administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy within 90 days of COVID-19 diagnosis was not predictive of COVID-19 hospitalization (OR 0.83, CI 0.41, 1.68) or mortality (OR 1.56, CI 0.67, 3.53). CONCLUSIONS: The case fatality rate among patients with gynecologic malignancy with COVID-19 infection was 17.6%. Cancer-directed therapy was not associated with an increased risk of mortality related to COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Carcinoma/complications , Carcinoma/mortality , Genital Neoplasms, Female/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Carcinoma/therapy , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Logistic Models , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Patient Acuity , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
9.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(5): 658-669, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554526

ABSTRACT

This is a report from the European Society of Gynaecological Oncology State-of-the-Art Virtual Meeting held December 14-16, 2020. The unique 3-day conference offered comprehensive state-of-the-art summaries on the major advances in the treatment of different types of gynecological cancers. Sessions opened with a case presentation followed by a keynote lecture and interactive debates with opinion leaders in the field. The speakers also presented scientific reviews on the clinical trial landscape in collaboration with the European Network of Gynecological Oncological Trial (ENGOT) groups. In addition, the new ESGO-ESRTO-ESP endometrial cancer guidelines were officially presented in public. This paper describes the key information and latest studies that were presented for the first time at the conference.


Subject(s)
Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Gynecology , Medical Oncology , Europe , Female , Humans , Societies, Medical
10.
Curr Treat Options Oncol ; 22(12): 117, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527505

ABSTRACT

OPINION STATEMENT: COVID-19 has transformed the care we provide to gynecologic oncology patients. In addition to directly impacting the diagnosis and treatment of women with gynecologic cancer, it has affected our patient's ability to undergo recommended surveillance and has made an impact on every caregiver providing care during this time. Herein we review the current literature on the impact of COVID-19 on gynecologic oncology and highlight new approaches and innovations that have resulted in gynecologic cancer care as a result of the pandemic. The impact of COVID-19 on the field of gynecologic oncology has been profound. In addition to directly impacting the diagnosis and treatment of women with cancer, it has also challenged the very ethics with which we practice medicine. The equitable distribution of resources is paramount to upholding the Hippocratic Oath which we all invoke. The COVID-19 pandemic has stripped this oath down to its very core, forcing all medical practitioners to scrutinize who gets what resources and when. As the pandemic continues to unfold, the question remains - in the setting of a strained and overburdened healthcare system, how do we maximize beneficence to one group of patients, while maintaining non-maleficence to others? As gynecologic oncologists, we are responsible for advocating for our patients to ensure that the quality of their cancer care is not compromised, while also not overutilizing resources that are sorely needed for the care of COVID-19 victims, and not making them more likely to succumb to COVID-19 by the very nature of the treatment we provide. The effects of the pandemic are far-reaching and broad, and many of these are yet to be determined. Future studies are needed to analyze how the above-utilized strategies in GYN cancer care during the pandemic will impact the long-term outcomes of our patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Oncologists/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/virology , Humans
11.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 32(1): 9-14, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526516

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, pressures on clinical services required adaptation to how care was prioritised and delivered for women with gynecological cancer. This document discusses potential 'salvage' measures when treatment has deviated from the usual standard of care. The British Gynaecological Cancer Society convened a multidisciplinary working group to develop recommendations for the onward management and follow-up of women with gynecological cancer who have been impacted by a change in treatment during the pandemic. These recommendations are presented for each tumor type and for healthcare systems, and the impact on gynecological services are discussed. It will be important that patient concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on their cancer pathway are acknowledged and addressed for their ongoing care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Female , Gynecology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 305(3): 555-565, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499442

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Synthesis of available evidence on clinical practice in gynaecological oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic is highly warranted, as women with cancer are at increased risk due to their systemic immunosuppressed state and changes in their care are inevitable. Rapid review of available data is a quick way of providing useful information and insight into the way medical practice has been affected by the COVID pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a systematic rapid review, based on a literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL. We considered all studies on gynaecological oncology care during the COVID-19 pandemic using relevant keywords and MeSH terms. Selection criteria were English language, studies with more than five cases and publication in peer-review journal. RESULTS: Nine retrospective studies, one systematic review and five questionnaire surveys were included. Quality of the studies has been assessed. Development of higher quality evidence is warranted. Mortality of COVID-19 infection is higher in patients with gynaecological cancer than in non-cancer patients. Reported delays in diagnosis and management of cancer and changes in treatments, may affect the natural history of cancer and increase patients' anxiety and fear of disease progression while causing concerns to healthcare professionals affecting their clinical practice. The number of new diagnoses has declined. Prioritization is important, face-to-face interactions should be limited, and appropriate protective measures are essential. Cancer surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy should continue as high priority practices. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected clinical practice significantly. Adaptations in clinical practice may improve mortality and complication rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Phobic Disorders , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Cancer ; 127(14): 2399-2408, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New York City (NYC) emerged as an epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, and marginalized populations were affected at disproportionate rates. The authors sought to determine the impact of COVID-19 on cancer treatment, anxiety, and financial distress among low-income patients with gynecologic cancer during the peak of the NYC pandemic. METHODS: Medicaid-insured women who were receiving gynecologic oncology care at 2 affiliated centers were contacted by telephone interviews between March 15 and April 15, 2020. Demographics and clinical characteristics were obtained through self-report and retrospective chart review. Financial toxicity, anxiety, and cancer worry were assessed using modified, validated surveys. RESULTS: In total, 100 patients completed the telephone interview. The median age was 60 years (range, 19-86 years), and 71% had an annual income <$40,000. A change in employment status and early stage cancer (stage I and II) were associated with an increase in financial distress (P < .001 and P = .008, respectively). Early stage cancer and telehealth participation were significantly associated with increased worry about future finances (P = .017 and P = .04, respectively). Lower annual income (<$40,000) was associated with increased cancer worry and anxiety compared with higher annual income (>$40,000; P = .036 and P = .017, respectively). When controlling for telehealth participation, income, primary language, and residence in a high COVID-19 prevalence area, a delay in medical care resulted in a 4-fold increased rate of anxiety (P = .023, 95% CI, 1.278-14.50). Race was not significantly associated with increased financial distress, cancer worry, or anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Low socioeconomic status was the most common risk factor for increased financial distress, cancer worry, and anxiety. Interventions aimed at improving access to timely oncology care should be implemented during this ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Financial Stress/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Pandemics/economics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/economics , Female , Financial Stress/etiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/economics , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Humans , Medicaid , Mental Health , Middle Aged , New York City , Pilot Projects , Poverty , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , United States , Young Adult
16.
Gynecol Oncol ; 162(1): 4-11, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225432

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has quickly transformed healthcare systems with expansion of telemedicine. The past year has highlighted risks to immunosuppressed cancer patients and shown the need for health equity among vulnerable groups. In this study, we describe the utilization of virtual visits by patients with gynecologic malignancies and assess their social vulnerability. METHODS: Virtual visit data of 270 gynecology oncology patients at a single institution from March 1, 2020 to August 31, 2020 was obtained by querying a cohort discovery tool. Through geocoding, the CDC Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) was utilized to assign social vulnerability indices to each patient and the results were analyzed for trends and statistical significance. RESULTS: African American patients were the most vulnerable with a median SVI of 0.71, Asian 0.60, Hispanic 0.41, and Caucasian 0.21. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this study were Caucasian, 8.9% African American, 3.3% Hispanic, and 1.1% Asian, which is comparable to the baseline institutional gynecologic cancer population. The mean census tract SVI variable when comparing patients to all census tracts in the United States was 0.31 (range 0.00 least vulnerable to 0.98 most vulnerable). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual visits were utilized by patients of all ages and gynecologic cancer types. African Americans were the most socially vulnerable patients of the cohort. Telemedicine is a useful platform for cancer care across the social vulnerability spectrum during the pandemic and beyond. To ensure continued access, further research and outreach efforts are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Gynecology/organization & administration , Gynecology/standards , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data
18.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(8): 1154-1158, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, cancer care had to be reorganized; national and international recommendations were published to manage anticancer treatments safely and to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection for patients and health workers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the adoption of recommendations for the management of patients with gynaecologic cancer receiving treatment during the pandemic resulted in containment of infections and continuing oncologic care. METHODS: Based on the published recommendations, and according to the local Health Direction guidelines, we developed and drafted a security protocol to modify access of patients with gynaecologic cancer to the "Fondazione Policlinico Agostino Gemelli-IRCCS, Rome" between February 1 and April 30, 2020 and compared results with the corresponding 3 months of 2019. RESULTS: Between February and April 2019, we registered 3254 admissions, including 2253 patients receiving intravenous chemotherapies, 298 receiving oral therapies, and 703 having hospital visits. Between February and April 2020, we registered 3213 admissions, including 2221 patients receiving intravenous chemotherapies, 401 receiving oral therapies, and 591 having hospital visits. Oral treatments and general visits were different in the two time periods (p<0.001). Despite the elevated patient flow, only one patient (0.1%) tested positive for COVID-19 and there were no cases among healthcare staff. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the adopted security protocol we provided continuity of care for all patients and limited the spread of the COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
20.
Bull Cancer ; 108(1): 55-66, 2021 Jan.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009338

ABSTRACT

The editorial committee of the Bulletin du Cancer is proud to comply with his annual analysis of some of the worldwide updates in oncology that emerge in 2020. We know that all new breakthroughs will not be addressed and apologise for not being comprehensive, but we hope that the topics deciphered herein will bring the reader interesting information in his daily practice in gyneco-oncology, uro-oncology, neuro-oncology, digestive oncology, pneumo-oncology, hemato-oncology, pediatric oncology, or in palliative care.


Subject(s)
Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Brain Neoplasms/therapy , Digestive System Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Glioblastoma/therapy , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Male , Neoplasms, Unknown Primary/therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms, Castration-Resistant/genetics , Prostatic Neoplasms, Castration-Resistant/therapy , Urologic Neoplasms/therapy
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