Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(13)2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934132

ABSTRACT

Boesenbergia rotunda (Zingiberaceae), is a high-value culinary and ethno-medicinal plant of Southeast Asia. The rhizomes of this herb have a high flavanone and chalcone content. Here we report the genome analysis of B. rotunda together with a complete genome sequence as a hybrid assembly. B. rotunda has an estimated genome size of 2.4 Gb which is assembled as 27,491 contigs with an N50 size of 12.386 Mb. The highly heterozygous genome encodes 71,072 protein-coding genes and has a 72% repeat content, with class I TEs occupying ~67% of the assembled genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of the 18 chromosome pairs at the metaphase showed six sites of 45S rDNA and two sites of 5S rDNA. An SSR analysis identified 238,441 gSSRs and 4604 EST-SSRs with 49 SSR markers common among related species. Genome-wide methylation percentages ranged from 73% CpG, 36% CHG and 34% CHH in the leaf to 53% CpG, 18% CHG and 25% CHH in the embryogenic callus. Panduratin A biosynthetic unigenes were most highly expressed in the watery callus. B rotunda has a relatively large genome with a high heterozygosity and TE content. This assembly and data (PRJNA71294) comprise a source for further research on the functional genomics of B. rotunda, the evolution of the ginger plant family and the potential genetic selection or improvement of gingers.


Subject(s)
Ginger , Zingiberaceae , Biosynthetic Pathways , DNA, Ribosomal , Flavonoids , Ginger/genetics , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence , Microsatellite Repeats/genetics , Zingiberaceae/genetics
2.
Appl Biochem Biotechnol ; 194(1): 291-301, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748423

ABSTRACT

Corona virus pandemic outbreak also known as COVID-19 has created an imbalance in this world. Scientists have adopted the use of natural or alternative medicines which are consumed mostly as dietary supplements to boost the immune system as herbal remedies. India is famous for traditional medicinal formulations which includes 'Trikadu'-a combination of three acrids, namely Zingiber officinale, Piper nigrum and Piper longum which have antioxidant properties that boost our immune system hence acting as a strong preventive measure. In this study, AutoDock 4.0 was used to study interaction between the phytocompounds of Trikadu with RNA-dependent polymerase protein and enveloped protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Analysis of the results showed that coumarin, coumaperine and bisdemethoxycurcumin showed strong bonding interactions with both the proteins. We can conclude that Trikadu has the potential molecules; hence, it can be incorporated in the diet to boost the immune system as a preventive measure against the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Phytotherapy , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Antioxidants/isolation & purification , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/drug effects , Dietary Supplements , Ginger/chemistry , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , India , Ligands , Medicine, Traditional , Molecular Docking Simulation , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/therapeutic use , Piper/chemistry , Piper nigrum/chemistry , Plant Preparations/isolation & purification , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/drug effects
3.
Molecules ; 26(17)2021 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374472

ABSTRACT

This study aims to identify and isolate the secondary metabolites of Zingiber officinale using GC-MS, preparative TLC, and LC-MS/MS methods, to evaluate the inhibitory potency on SARS-CoV-2 3 chymotrypsin-like protease enzyme, as well as to study the molecular interaction and stability by using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. GC-MS analysis suggested for the isolation of terpenoids compounds as major compounds on methanol extract of pseudostems and rhizomes. Isolation and LC-MS/MS analysis identified 5-hydro-7, 8, 2'-trimethoxyflavanone (9), (E)-hexadecyl-ferulate (1), isocyperol (2), N-isobutyl-(2E,4E)-octadecadienamide (3), and nootkatone (4) from the rhizome extract, as well as from the leaves extract with the absence of 9. Three known steroid compounds, i.e., spinasterone (7), spinasterol (8), and 24-methylcholesta-7-en-3ß-on (6), were further identified from the pseudostem extract. Molecular docking showed that steroids compounds 7, 8, and 6 have lower predictive binding energies (MMGBSA) than other metabolites with binding energy of -87.91, -78.11, and -68.80 kcal/mole, respectively. Further characterization on the single isolated compound by NMR showed that 6 was identified and possessed 75% inhibitory activity on SARS-CoV-2 3CL protease enzyme that was slightly different with the positive control GC376 (77%). MD simulations showed the complex stability with compound 6 during 100 ns simulation time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Ginger/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/ultrastructure , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Crystallography, X-Ray , Enzyme Assays , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfonic Acids/pharmacology
4.
J Complement Integr Med ; 18(4): 775-781, 2021 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160235

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Herbal medicines, as a treatment method, have received a great deal of attention. The effects of two herbal medicines namely Zingiber officinale and Echinacea on alleviation of clinical symptoms and hospitalization rate of suspected COVID-19 outpatients were examined. METHODS: A clinical trial with 100 suspected COVID-19 outpatients as participants was conducted. The participants were allocated randomly to two groups of 50 members. The intervention group received concurrent Zingiber officinale (Tablet Vomigone 500 mg II tds) and Echinacea (Tablet Rucoldup I tds) for seven days in addition to the standard treatment. The control group only received the standard treatment (Hydroxychloroquine). After seven days, alleviation of clinical symptoms and hospitalization rate were examined. In addition, 14 days after treatment, the hospitalization was assessed again by telephone follow up. RESULTS: The two groups were identical in terms of basic characteristics. Improvement level as to coughing, dyspnea, and muscle pain was higher in the intervention group (p value <0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the other symptoms. In addition, the hospitalization rate in the intervention and control groups were 2 and 6% respectively, which are not significantly different (p value >0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Taking into account the efficiency and trivial side-effects of Zingiber officinale and Echinacea, using them for alleviation and control of the clinical symptoms in COVID-19 outpatients is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Echinacea , Ginger , Hospitalization , Humans , Outpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
5.
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol ; 414: 115425, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by SARS-CoV-2 which belongs to coronaviridae family. Despite the global prevalence, there are currently no vaccines or drugs. Dietary plant derived exosome-like vesicles are known as edible nanoparticles (ENPs). ENPs are filled with microRNAs (miRNAs), in bioavailable form. Recently, cross-kingdom regulation of human transcripts by plant miRNAs have been demonstrated. However, ENP derived miRNAs targeting SARS-CoV-2 has not been described. STUDY DESIGN: Mature ENP-derived miRNA sequences were retrieved from small RNA sequencing datasets available in the literature. In silico target prediction was performed to identify miRNAs that could target SARS-CoV-2. ENPs were isolated from ginger and grapefruit plants and the expression of SARS-CoV-2 targeting miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR. RESULTS: From a total of 260 ENP-derived miRNAs, we identified 22 miRNAs that could potentially target SARS-CoV-2 genome. 11 miRNAs showed absolute target specificity towards SARS-CoV-2 but not SARS-CoV. ENPs from soybean, ginger, hamimelon, grapefruit, tomato and pear possess multiple miRNAs targeting different regions within SARS-CoV-2. Interestingly, osa/cme miR-530b-5p specifically targeted the ribosomal slippage site between ORF1a and ORF1b. We validated the relative expression of six miRNAs (miR-5077, miR-6300, miR-156a, miR-169, miR-5059 and miR-166 m) in ginger and grapefruit ENPs by RT-PCR which showed differential enrichment of specific miRNAs in ginger and grapefruit ENPs. CONCLUSION: Since administration of ENPs leads to their accumulation into lung tissues in vivo, ENP derived miRNAs targeting SARS-CoV-2 genome has the potential to be developed as an alternative therapy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Exosomes/chemistry , MicroRNAs/pharmacology , Nanoparticles , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Edible/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Base Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , Citrus paradisi/chemistry , Computer Simulation , Genome, Viral , Ginger/chemistry , Humans , MicroRNAs/isolation & purification , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Plants, Edible/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
6.
Trials ; 21(1): 841, 2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We investigate the effects of Ginger, compared to the usual therapeutic regimen on clinical manifestations and paraclinical features in patients with confirmed COVID-19 that are moderately ill. TRIAL DESIGN: This is a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with parallel group design. PARTICIPANTS: Inclusion criteria: 1. Patients admitted to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Departments at Shahid Mohammadi Hospital, Bandar Abbas, Iran 2. Age ≥18 years (weight ≥35 kg) 3. Hospitalized ≤48 hours 4. Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis (Positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) 5. Moderate pneumonia and lung involvement in imaging 6. Signing informed consent and willingness of study participant to accept randomization to any assigned treatment arm Exclusion criteria: 1. Underlying diseases, including heart disease, chronic hypertension, severe renal failure, severe liver failure, and thyroid disorders 2. Use of warfarin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), diuretics, corticosteroids, and antiarrhythmic drugs 3. Severe and critical pneumonia 4. History of known allergy to Ginger 5. Pregnancy and breastfeeding INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Intervention group: The standard treatment regimen for COVID-19 along with Ginger-based herbal tablets (Vomigone ®, Dineh Pharmaceutical Company, Iran) at a dose of 1000 mg three times a day for a period of seven days. CONTROL GROUP: The standard treatment for COVID-19 based on the Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education's protocol, along with Vomigone-like placebo tablets (Dineh Pharmaceutical Company, Iran) at a dose of two tablets three times a day for a period of seven days. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary outcome is recovery rate of clinical symptoms, including fever, dry cough, tiredness, and GI symptoms as well as paraclinical features, including thrombocytopenia, lymphocytopenia, and C-reactive protein within seven days of randomization. Time to improvement of clinical and paraclinical features along with the incidence of serious adverse events are the secondary outcomes within seven days of randomization. RANDOMIZATION: An interactive web-based system will be used to allocate eligible participants, based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, to one of the two study arms (in a 1:1 ratio) using block randomization. BLINDING (MASKING): All study participants, research coordinators, clinicians, nurses, and investigators will be blinded to the group assignment. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMIZED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 84 participants will be randomized into two groups of 42 patients. TRIAL STATUS: The protocol is Version 1.0, May 23, 2020. Recruitment began July 21, 2020, and is anticipated to be completed by October 30, 2020. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This clinical trial has been registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT). The registration number is " IRCT20200506047323N1 ". Registration date is 23 May 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Ginger , Pandemics , Phytotherapy/methods , Plant Preparations/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral , Symptom Assessment/methods , Administration, Oral , Adult , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tablets
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL