Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
J Trauma Nurs ; 28(5): 298-303, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The high mortality rate of comatose patients with traumatic brain injury is a prominent public health issue that negatively impacts patients and their families. Objective, reliable tools are needed to guide treatment decisions and prioritize resources. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of the bispectral index (BIS) in comatose patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 84 patients with severe brain injury and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 8 and less treated from January 2015 to June 2017. Sedatives were withheld at least 24 hr before BIS scoring. The BIS value, GCS scores, and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) were monitored hourly for 48 hr. Based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score, the patients were divided into poor (GOS score: 1-2) and good prognosis groups (GOS score: 3-5). The correlation between BIS and prognosis was analyzed by logistic regression, and the receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted. RESULTS: The mean (SD) of the BIS value: 54.63 (11.76), p = .000; and GCS score: 5.76 (1.87), p = .000, were higher in the good prognosis group than in the poor prognosis group. Lower BIS values and GCS scores were correlated with poorer prognosis. Based on the area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic curves, the optimal diagnostic cutoff value of the BIS was 43.6, and the associated sensitivity and specificity were 85.4% and 74.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our study indicates that BIS had good predictive value on prognosis. These findings suggested that BIS could be used to evaluate the severity and prognosis of severe brain injury.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries , Coma , Coma/diagnosis , Electroencephalography , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
2.
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) ; 31(1): 52-58, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455660

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to identify the correlation between bispectral index (BIS) value and modified Glasgow Coma Scale (MGCS) score in dogs with altered level of consciousness (ALOC). DESIGN: This prospective, observational, clinical study was conducted from February 2016 to March 2017, and follow-up was conducted until the death of dogs or their discharge from the hospital. SETTING: This study was performed at the Small Animal Teaching Hospital. ANIMALS: A total of 31 client-owned dogs (males, 20; females, 11) with ALOC and MGCS score <18 with no restrictions for age, breed, sex, and body weight were included. Dogs that received neuromuscular blocking agents before MGCS score evaluation were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: BIS values were measured using the Covidien BIS Loc 2 Channel OEM module and a pediatric 4 sensor with a bifrontal application pattern. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Minimal databases of initial neurological assessment, blood profiles, and chest and skull radiographs were developed. In addition, MGCS scores and BIS values were recorded. The mean BIS values for mild, moderate, and severe brain injuries were 89.14 ± 6.52, 77.21 ± 9.82, and 50.58 ± 27.04, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed a significantly positive relationship between BIS values and MGCS scores (r = 0.75; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The significant correlation observed between MGCS scores and BIS values in dogs with ALOC demonstrated the usefulness of BIS as an alternative to MGCS for monitoring consciousness in patients with ALOC caused by traumatic brain injury, encephalitis, etc.


Subject(s)
Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Glasgow Coma Scale/veterinary , Monitoring, Physiologic/veterinary , Unconsciousness/veterinary , Animals , Dogs , Female , Male , Prospective Studies , Unconsciousness/diagnosis
3.
J Clin Neurosci ; 93: 241-246, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of death and disability among the elderly patient population. This study aimed to assess the predictors of in-hospital mortality of elderly patients with moderate to severe TBI who presented during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: In this retrospective analytical study, all elderly patients with moderate to severe TBI who were referred to our center between March 2nd, 2020 to August 1st, 2020 were investigated and compared against the TBI patients receiving treatment during the same time period within the year 2019. Patients were followed until discharge from the hospital or death. The demographic, clinical, radiological, and laboratory test data were evaluated. Data were analyzed using SPSS-21 software. FINDINGS: In this study, 359 elderly patients were evaluated (n = 162, Post-COVID-19). Fifty-four patients of the cohort had COVID-19 disease with a mortality rate was 33.3%. The patients with COVID-19 were 5.45 times more likely to expire before discharge (P < 0.001) than the TBI patients who were not COVID-19 positive. Other variables such as hypotension (OR, 4.57P < 0.001), hyperglycemia (OR, 2.39, P = 0.002), and use of anticoagulant drugs (OR, 2.41P = 0.001) were also associated with in-hospital death.According to the binary logistic regression analysis Age (OR, 1.72; 95% CI: 1.26-2.18; P = 0.033), Coronavirus infection (OR, 2.21; 95% CI: 1.83-2.92; P = 0.011) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (OR, 3.11; 95% CI: 2.12-4.53; P < 0.001) were independent risk factors correlated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality of elderly patients with moderate to severe TBI. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that Coronavirus infection could increase the risk of in-hospital mortality of elderly patients with moderate to severe TBI significantly.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic , COVID-19 , Aged , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(8)2021 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354558

ABSTRACT

A 60-year-old patient presented with respiratory distress, after recently being tested COVID-19 positive and was mechanically ventilated for 15 days. After cessation of sedation, he remained in deep comatose state, without any reaction on pain stimuli (Glasgow Coma Score 3). MRI of the brain showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy and multiple (>50) microbleeds. Diffuse COVID-19-associated leukoencephalopathy with microhaemorrhages is associated with a poor prognosis. However, 3 months later, our patient showed a remarkable recovery and was able to walk independently. This case report shows COVID-related leukoencephalopathy and intracerebral microbleeds, even with persistent comatose state, may have a favourable clinical outcome and prolonged treatment should be considered in individual cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukoencephalopathies , Cerebral Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Coma/chemically induced , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnosis , Leukoencephalopathies/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 144(3): 251-259, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240998

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the association between impairment of consciousness and risk of death in people with COVID-19. METHODS: In this multicentre retrospective study, we enrolled people with confirmed COVID-19 from 44 hospitals in Wuhan and Sichuan, China, between 18 January and 30 March 2020. We extracted demographics, clinical, laboratory data and consciousness level (as measured by the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score) from medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards regression, structural equation modelling and survival time analysis to compare people with different progressions of impaired consciousness. RESULTS: We enrolled 1,143 people (average age 51.3 ± standard deviation 17.1-year-old; 50.3% males), of whom 76 died. Increased mortality risk was identified in people with GCS score between 9 and 14 (hazard ratio (HR) 46.76, p < .001) and below 9 (HR 65.86, p < .001). Pathway analysis suggested a significant direct association between consciousness level and death. Other factors, including age, oxygen saturation level and pH, had indirect associations with death mediated by GCS scores. People who developed impaired consciousness more rapidly either from symptoms onset (<10 days vs. 10-19 days, p = .025, <10 days vs. ≥20 days and 10-19 days vs. ≥20 days, <.001) or deterioration of oxygen saturation (≤2 days vs.>2 days, p = .028) had shorter survival times. CONCLUSION: Altered consciousness and its progression had a direct link with death in COVID-19. Interactions with age, oxygen saturation level and pH suggest possible pathophysiology. Further work to confirm these findings explore prevention strategies and interventions to decrease mortality is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Consciousness , Disease Progression , COVID-19/virology , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors
6.
Neurology ; 96(20): e2558-e2560, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232452

ABSTRACT

Patients with traumatic brain injury may be dependent on the decision-making of their families. Restrictive visitation policies implemented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affect these patients and their families. This narrative aims to illustrate this phenomenon and catalyze discussions regarding the need for careful evaluation of restrictive family visitation policies and exceptions that may be required for patients with brain injuries.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Decision Making, Shared , Head Injuries, Penetrating/therapy , Visitors to Patients , Wounds, Gunshot/therapy , Adult , Critical Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/standards , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Neurosurgeons , Palliative Care , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Visitors to Patients/psychology
7.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 31, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170532

ABSTRACT

Background: In many low- and middle-income countries, where vaccinations will be delayed and healthcare systems are underdeveloped, the COVID-19 pandemic will continue for the foreseeable future. Mortality scales can aid frontline providers in low-resource settings (LRS) in identifying those at greatest risk of death so that limited resources can be directed towards those in greatest need and unnecessary loss of life is prevented. While many prognostication tools have been developed for, or applied to, COVID-19 patients, no tools to date have been purpose-designed for, and validated in, LRS. Objectives: This study aimed to develop a pragmatic tool to assist LRS frontline providers in evaluating in-hospital mortality risk using only easy-to-obtain demographic and clinical inputs. Methods: Machine learning was used on data from a retrospective cohort of Sudanese COVID-19 patients at two government referral hospitals to derive contextually appropriate mortality indices for COVID-19, which were then assessed by C-indices. Findings: Data from 467 patients were used to derive two versions of the AFEM COVID-19 Mortality Scale (AFEM-CMS), which evaluates in-hospital mortality risk using demographic and clinical inputs that are readily obtainable in hospital receiving areas. Both versions of the tool include age, sex, number of comorbidities, Glasgow Coma Scale, respiratory rate, and systolic blood pressure; in settings with pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation is included and in settings without access, heart rate is included. The AFEM-CMS showed good discrimination: the model including pulse oximetry had a C-statistic of 0.775 (95% CI: 0.737-0.813) and the model excluding it had a C-statistic of 0.719 (95% CI: 0.678-0.760). Conclusions: In the face of an enduring pandemic in many LRS, the AFEM-CMS serves as a practical solution to aid frontline providers in effectively allocating healthcare resources. The tool's generalisability is likely narrow outside of similar extremely LRS settings, and further validation studies are essential prior to broader use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Developing Countries , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Pressure , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Rate , Sudan , Survival Rate
8.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 83, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The respiratory system involvement is the most common presentation of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, other organs including the central nervous system (CNS) could be affected by the virus. Strokes, seizures, change in mental status, and encephalitis have been reported as the neurological manifestation of the disease. We hypothesized that COVID-19 could predispose younger patients to spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The present study aimed to investigate whether COVID-19 has any relationship with the occurrence of spontaneous ICH in young or not. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all the patients with spontaneous ICH who were referred to our center between 20 Feb and 1 Sep 2020. The demographic, clinical, radiological, and laboratory test data were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups. The COVID-19 positive patients and COVID-19 negative ones. All the variables including age, sex, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), hematoma volume and location, the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus on admission, the length of hospital stay, the lab test results and the clinical outcome at last visit or discharge as Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There were 22 COVID-19 positive patients (20.8%) and 84 COVID-19 negative ones (79.2%). The mean age of the patients in the case group (54.27 ± 4.67) was significantly lower than that in the control group (69.88 ± 4.47) (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, our results showed a significant difference between the two groups based on the presence of chronic arterial hypertension (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups based on gender, diabetes mellitus, smoking, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), hematoma volume, need for surgery, the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus on admission, White Blood Cell (WBC) count, platelet count, Prothrombin Time (PT), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that COVID positive patients with ICH are younger and with less predisposing factors than COVID negative subjects with ICH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Hematoma/epidemiology , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Glasgow Outcome Scale , Hematoma/surgery , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydrocephalus/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
10.
Ir J Med Sci ; 190(4): 1281-1293, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on trauma referrals to a National Neurosurgical Centre during the first wave of COVID-19 in Ireland. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of all trauma referrals to the National Neurosurgical Centre at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, during the period March 1-May 31, 2019 and 2020. Patient characteristics including age, sex, alcohol use, anticoagulant/antiplatelet use and initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) were recorded. Patients were grouped based on trauma aetiology and diagnosis. RESULTS: There were 527 and 437 trauma referrals in 2019 and 2020 respectively. Overall, there was a 17.1% reduction in trauma referrals between 2019 and 2020. Traumatic brain injury, spinal injury and cranial fractures referrals reduced 25% (375 vs 283), 59% (32 vs 13) and 18% (39 vs 32) respectively from 2019 to 2020. Low-energy falls below 2 m was the most common mechanism of injury and accounted for 60 and 61% of referrals in 2019 and 2020. No reduction in road traffic collision (33 vs 34) and assault (40 vs 40) referrals were observed between years. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on both the volume and mechanism of trauma referrals to the National Neurosurgical Centre in Ireland, with falls below 2 m the most common mechanism of trauma referral across both years. The workload remains substantial and a fully resourced neurosurgical department is essential in any future COVID-19 waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Neurol Sci ; 42(2): 445-453, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some previous reports have shown a reduced number of admission in stroke cases during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic period. The present study aimed to investigate this changing pattern and the potential causes behind it at an academic neurology and neurosurgery center in Iran. METHODS: Patients admitted to our center with the diagnosis of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, between March 1, 2019, Jun 1, 2019, and the similar 3-month period in 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic period), were compared in terms of clinical characteristics and outcome. Poisson regression was also conducted to assess the correlation between daily admissions and the COVID-19 pandemic period. RESULTS: A total of 210 patients with stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic) in 2019 were compared with 106 patients in 2020. COVID-19 pandemic period was significantly associated with the decline in the number of daily admissions in ischemic stroke (IRR, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.4-0.64]). A significant reduction (P = 0.003) in time from onset to arrival at hospital from median 12 h [IQR, 5-32] in 2019 to median 6 h [IQR, 4-16] in 2020 was found in ischemic stroke cases. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was significantly increased (P < 0.001) from median 4 [IQR, 2-7] in 2019 to median 9 [IQR, 4-14] in 2020. Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was significantly decreased from 13.9 (SD, 2) in 2019 to 12.8 (SD, 2.9) in 2020 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provided new pieces of evidence regarding the changed pattern of hospital admission in stroke especially the possible reasons for its decline.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Stroke/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hemorrhagic Stroke/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
13.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(9)2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823795

ABSTRACT

Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) is a Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) spectrum disorder associated with predominantly central nervous system predilection. Patients exhibit a variable constellation of depressed consciousness, bilateral external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and long tract signs. Although the pathophysiology is not fully understood, it has been associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies in two-thirds of patients. We present a patient with clinical features consistent with BBE and positive anti-GM1 and anti-GD1a antibodies. A diagnostic approach to the acutely unwell patient with brainstem encephalitis is explored in this clinical context with a literature review of the aforementioned ganglioside antibody significance. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is highlighted in BBE using up-to-date evidence-based extrapolation from GBS.


Subject(s)
Ataxia/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , Brain Stem/immunology , Encephalitis/diagnosis , Ophthalmoplegia/immunology , Adult , Ataxia/blood , Autoantibodies/immunology , Diagnosis, Differential , Electroencephalography , Encephalitis/blood , Encephalitis/complications , Encephalitis/immunology , G(M1) Ganglioside/immunology , Gangliosides/immunology , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Male , Ophthalmoplegia/blood
14.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(12): 2243-2249, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778404

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a profound effect on the provision of medical care. As the curve progresses and patients are discharged, the rehabilitation wave brings a high number of postacute COVID-19 patients suffering from physical, mental, and cognitive impairments threatening their return to normal life. The complexity and severity of disease in patients recovering from severe COVID-19 infection require an approach that is implemented as early in the recovery phase as possible, in a concerted and systematic way. To address the rehabilitation wave, we describe a spectrum of interventions that start in the intensive care unit and continue through all the appropriate levels of care. This approach requires organized rehabilitation teams including physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, rehabilitation psychologists or neuropsychologists, and physiatrists collaborating with acute medical teams. Here, we also discuss administrative factors that influence the provision of care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The services that can be provided are described in detail to allow the reader to understand what services may be appropriate locally. We have been learning and adapting real time during this crisis and hope that sharing our experience facilitates the work of others as the pandemic evolves. It is our goal to help reduce the potentially long-lasting challenges faced by COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/organization & administration , Survivors , Activities of Daily Living , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Disability Evaluation , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Intensive Care Units/standards , Medicare/organization & administration , Pandemics , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
15.
Stroke ; 51(9): 2674-2682, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: No studies have reported the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic on patients with preexisting stroke. We aim to study the clinical course of COVID-19 patients with preexisting stroke and to investigate death-related risk factors. METHODS: We consecutively included 651 adult inpatients with COVID-19 from the Central Hospital of Wuhan between January 2 and February 15, 2020. Data on the demography, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, treatments, complications, and outcomes (ie, discharged or death) of the participants were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between patients with and without preexisting stroke. The association between risk factors and mortality was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model for stroke patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. RESULTS: Of the 651 patients with COVID-19, 49 with preexisting stroke tended to be elderly, male, had more underlying comorbidities and greater severity of illness, prolonged length of hospital stay, and greater hospitalization expenses than those without preexisting stroke. Cox regression analysis indicated that the patients with stroke had a higher risk of developing critical pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.01 [95% CI, 1.27-3.16]) and subsequent mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.00-2.98]) than the patients without stroke. Among the 49 stroke patients, older age and higher score of Glasgow Coma Scale or Sequential Organ Failure Assessment were independent risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Preexisting stroke patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 were readily predisposed to death, providing an important message to individuals and health care workers that preventive measures must be implemented to protect and reduce transmission in stroke patients in this COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Stroke/complications , Stroke/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Progression , Electronic Health Records , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stroke/therapy , Treatment Outcome
16.
Acad Emerg Med ; 27(6): 461-468, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686322

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Rapid and early severity-of-illness assessment appears to be important for critically ill patients with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the rapid scoring system on admission of these patients. METHODS: A total of 138 medical records of critically ill patients with COVID-19 were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics on admission used for calculating Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) and Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS) and outcomes (survival or death) were collected for each case and extracted for analysis. All patients were divided into two age subgroups (<65 years and ≥65 years). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed for overall patients and both subgroups. RESULTS: The median [25th quartile, 75th quartile] of MEWS of survivors versus nonsurvivors were 1 [1, 2] and 2 [1, 3] and those of REMS were 5 [2, 6] and 7 [6, 10], respectively. In overall analysis, the area under the ROC curve for the REMS in predicting mortality was 0.833 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.737 to 0.928), higher than that of MEWS (0.677, 95% CI = 0.541 to 0.813). An optimal cutoff of REMS (≥6) had a sensitivity of 89.5%, a specificity of 69.8%, a positive predictive value of 39.5%, and a negative predictive value of 96.8%. In the analysis of subgroup of patients aged <65 years, the area under the ROC curve for the REMS in predicting mortality was 0.863 (95% CI = 0.743 to 0.941), higher than that of MEWS (0.603, 95% CI = 0.462 to 0.732). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this study was the first exploration on rapid scoring systems for critically ill patients with COVID-19. The REMS could provide emergency clinicians with an effective adjunct risk stratification tool for critically ill patients with COVID-19, especially for the patients aged <65 years. The effectiveness of REMS for screening these patients is attributed to its high negative predictive value.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Blood Pressure , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , China , Comorbidity , Coronavirus , Critical Illness , Early Warning Score , Emergency Medicine , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Pandemics , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Respiratory Rate , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...