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5.
Lancet Glob Health ; 9(8): e1169-e1171, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213869

ABSTRACT

The ethical distribution of life-saving medical and public health interventions to vulnerable groups has often been overlooked. Valuation of life linked to an individual's country of origin, the pharmaceutical industry's prioritisation of profit, the exploitation of vulnerable groups in clinical trials, and the resulting hesitancy towards drugs and vaccines have, among other factors, made the human right to health unattainable for many people. The COVID-19 pandemic presents itself as an opportunity to reverse this long-standing trajectory of unethical practices in global health. By ensuring the ethical inclusion of vulnerable groups in the vaccine development process and making a safe, effective vaccine accessible to all, pharmaceutical companies, governments, and international organisations can usher in a new era of global health that relies solely on ethical decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/ethics , Health Care Rationing/ethics , Public Health/ethics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Vulnerable Populations
9.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(9): 968-970, 2020 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842091

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created new challenges on multiple fronts including a few ethical concerns. Timely and appropriate access to health services and the need to protect vulnerable people are some of them. An important aspect to consider, at the global level, is the frailty of health systems in many developing countries and the constant threat of these collapsing due to shortage of resources and medical supply. Special attention should be placed towards protecting the health of care workers who are highly exposed to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Research and clinical trials involving COVID-19 patients and healthy human volunteers must be done in strict adherence to the fundamental principles of bioethics, even if finding a solution is an urgent need. Shared responsibility must be assumed as we collectively face a common problem and ethical conflicts must be resolved using, as reference, the guidelines developed by the World Health Organization and other relevant international and national organizations. This would allow responsible action in the face of the pandemic without harming human rights, the individual and collective well-being.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Global Health/ethics , Pandemics/ethics , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/ethics , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Developing Countries , Health Personnel/ethics , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Human Rights/ethics , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/ethics
10.
11.
OMICS ; 24(11): 645-648, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-799701

ABSTRACT

Health futures are not preordained, nor are they entirely predictable by extrapolation from the past. This is particularly relevant in an era of unprecedented uncertainties converging from the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple zoonotic outbreaks for the past two decades, and the climate crisis currently unfolding. Moreover, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services cautioned in 2019 that around one million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction. Human existence and medical innovations are closely intertwined with preservation and sustainability of biodiversity. COVID-19 is a "dry run" for future ecological crises in the 21st century. We need new frames and ways of conceptualizing planetary health, biodiversity futures, and their principled governance post-COVID-19. In this article, I propose "One Nature" as a critically informed planetary health governance frame, and outline its key conceptual pillars. One Nature aims to transcend the socially constructed binaries between humans versus nature, humans versus nonhuman animals or inanimate objects in nature, among other false binaries, and thus, envisions nature as an overlapping, interdependent, and co-constitutive continuum among life forms and ecosystems. One Nature also recognizes animal sentience and agency of nonhuman animals. In doing so, the One Nature governance frame places a firm emphasis on the internal levers of social change and the human values essential to cultivate collective action to curb unchecked extraction of nature that placed human societies in harm's way for future health crises. One Nature is a governance frame and reflexive value system that can be transformative to correct the astigmatism we have long suffered, from the ways in which we have conceived, enacted on, and extracted the natural systems over the centuries. All in all, One Nature supports planetary health and biodiversity through a new vocabulary and post-anthropocentric critical governance lens, and shall help formulate progressive policies to prevent zoonotic outbreaks and future ecological crises.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Global Health/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/trends , Zoonoses/prevention & control , Animals , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biodiversity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Ecosystem , Global Health/ethics , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Politics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Justice/trends , Social Theory , Terminology as Topic
12.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 114, 2020 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771293

ABSTRACT

Solidarity in the general sense means unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; or mutual support within a group. There are different ways of standing in solidarity in different kinds of literatures. One of the most important ways is to advocate. Advocacy is a win-win strategy and a process of supporting and enabling people to express their views and concerns. In the end, I think sharing different types of solidarity can be one of the drivers that stimulate the solidarity itself, and I call on everyone to contribute to this sharing. I hope that this solidarity, which began in the world with the beginning of COVID-19, will not end with its end and will last forever because our world needs coexistence. This may be the only gift to the world from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Global Health , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Justice , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cooperative Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Global Health/ethics , Global Health/trends , Humans , Pandemics/ethics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Justice/ethics , Social Justice/trends , Social Responsibility
14.
J Bioeth Inq ; 17(4): 549-553, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728233

ABSTRACT

Our initial response to COVID-19 has been plagued by a series of failures-many of which have extended inequity within and across populations, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The global health governance of pandemic preparedness and response needs to move further away from the advocacy of a one-size-fits-all approach that tends to prioritize the interests of high-income countries towards a context-sensitive approach that gives equity a central role in guiding our pandemic preparedness and response strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/ethics , Global Health/ethics , International Cooperation , Intersectoral Collaboration , Pandemics/ethics , Social Justice , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Developed Countries , Developing Countries , Government , Humans , Moral Obligations , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Dev World Bioeth ; 21(1): 31-35, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688984

ABSTRACT

The ethical concept of justice, as it relates to the development and deployment of innovative health technologies, commands the fair and equitable distribution of burdens and benefits. In bioethics, specific guidance on practical strategies for achieving what this concept of justice demands are somewhat elusive. Drawing on issues of justice arising or likely to arise in the context of the search for a vaccine or cure for COVID-19, this paper argues for a focus on the concept of "practical justice" in post-pandemic bioethics work. To illustrate the value and promise of this concept, the paper reflects on an approach to achieving practical justice in health biotechnology research that is grounded in a commitment to offer technical assistance to developing and under-resourced nations.


Subject(s)
Bioethics , Biomedical Research/ethics , Biotechnology/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/economics , Global Health/ethics , Social Justice , Capacity Building , Developed Countries/economics , Developing Countries/economics , Humans
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