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1.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 2001192, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559108

ABSTRACT

This systematic review aims to summarize the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia in the general adult population and healthcare workers (HCWs) in several key regions worldwide during the first year of the COVID pandemic. Several literature databases were systemically searched for meta-analyses published by 22 September 2021 on the prevalence rates of mental health symptoms worldwide. The prevalence rates of mental health symptoms were summarized based on 388 empirical studies with a total of 1,067,021 participants from six regions and four countries. Comparatively, Africa and South Asia had the worse overall mental health symptoms, followed by Latin America. The research effort on mental health during COVID-19 has been highly skewed in terms of the scope of countries and mental health outcomes. The mental health symptoms are highly prevalent yet differ across regions, and such evidence helps to enable prioritization of mental health assistance efforts to allocate attention and resources based on the regional differences in mental health.


El objetivo de esa revisión sistemática es el de resumir la prevalencia de la ansiedad, la depresión y el insomnio, tanto en la población general adulta como en los trabajadores de salud de diferentes regiones clave alrededor del mundo durante el primer año de la pandemia por la COVID-19. Se revisaron de manera sistemática diversas bases de datos científicas buscando metaanálisis sobre la prevalencia de síntomas en salud mental alrededor del mundo, publicados hasta el 22 de setiembre del 2021. Se resumió la prevalencia de los síntomas de salud mental sobre la base de 388 estudios empíricos, comprendiendo a 1.067.021 participantes de cuatro países y de seis regiones. África y Asia meridional tuvieron, de manera general, los peores síntomas de salud mental, seguidas por Latinoamérica. El esfuerzo por realizar investigación en salud mental durante la pandemia por la COVID-19 ha estado altamente sesgado en torno a la envergadura de los países y de las medidas de resultado empleadas en salud mental. Los síntomas de salud mental son altamente prevalentes; no obstante, difieren a lo largo de diferentes regiones. Esta evidencia ayuda a permitir la priorización de los esfuerzos de atención en salud mental asignando la atención y recursos basados sobre las diferencias regionales en salud mental.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Africa/epidemiology , Asia/epidemiology , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Europe, Eastern/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Prevalence , Spain/epidemiology
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 768, 2021 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnant and postpartum women face unique challenges and concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus far, no studies have explored the factors associated with increased levels of worry in this population globally. The current study sought to assess the frequency and sources of worry during the COVID-19 pandemic in an international sample of pregnant and postpartum women. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey in 64 countries between May and June 2020. The survey was available in 12 languages and hosted on the Pregistry platform for COVID-19 studies. Participants were sought mainly on social media platforms and online parenting forums. The survey included questions related to demographics, level of worry, support, stress, COVID-19 exposure, frequency of media usage, and mental health indicators. RESULTS: The study included 7561 participants. Eighty-three percent of all participants indicated that they were either 'somewhat' or 'very' worried. Women 13-28 weeks pregnant were significantly more likely to indicate that they were 'very worried' compared to those who were postpartum or at other stages of pregnancy. When compared with women living in Europe, those in Africa, Asia and Pacific, North America and South/Latin America were more likely to have increased levels of worry, as were those who more frequently interacted with social media. Different forms of support and stress also had an impact upon level of worry, while indicators of stress and anxiety were positively associated with worry level. CONCLUSION: Pregnant and postpartum women are vulnerable to the changes in societal norms brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the factors associated with levels of worry within this population will enable society to address potential unmet needs and improve the current and future mental health of parents and children.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Odds Ratio , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
3.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(45): 1563-1569, 2021 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513269

ABSTRACT

In 2012, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Vaccine Action Plan,* with the objective of eliminating measles† in five of the six World Health Organization (WHO) regions by 2020 (1). The Immunization Agenda 2021-2030 (IA2030)§ uses measles incidence as an indicator of the strength of immunization systems. The Measles-Rubella Strategic Framework 2021-2030¶ and the Measles Outbreaks Strategic Response Plan 2021-2023** are aligned with the IA2030 and highlight robust measles surveillance systems to document immunity gaps, identify root causes of undervaccination, and develop locally tailored solutions to ensure administration of 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine (MCV) to all children. This report describes progress toward World Health Assembly milestones and measles elimination objectives during 2000-2020 and updates a previous report (2). During 2000-2010, estimated MCV first dose (MCV1) coverage increased globally from 72% to 84%, peaked at 86% in 2019, but declined to 84% in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. All countries conducted measles surveillance, although fewer than one third achieved the sensitivity indicator target of ≥2 discarded†† cases per 100,000 population in 2020. Annual reported measles incidence decreased 88% during 2000-2016, from 145 to 18 cases per 1 million population, rebounded to 120 in 2019, before falling to 22 in 2020. During 2000-2020, the annual number of estimated measles deaths decreased 94%, from 1,072,800 to 60,700, averting an estimated 31.7 million measles deaths. To achieve regional measles elimination targets, enhanced efforts are needed to reach all children with 2 MCV doses, implement robust surveillance, and identify and close immunity gaps.


Subject(s)
Disease Eradication , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Measles/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Immunization Programs , Incidence , Infant , Measles/epidemiology , Measles Vaccine/administration & dosage , World Health Organization
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(44): 1527-1533, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502900

ABSTRACT

Dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease), caused by the parasite Dracunculus medinensis, is traditionally acquired by drinking water containing copepods (water fleas) infected with D. medinensis larvae, but in recent years also appears increasingly to be transmitted by eating fish or other aquatic animals. The worm typically emerges through the skin on a lower limb of the host 1 year after infection, causing pain and disability (1). There is no vaccine or medicine to prevent or medicine to treat dracunculiasis; eradication relies on case containment* to prevent water contamination and other interventions to prevent infection: health education, water filtration, treatment of unsafe water with temephos (an organophosphate larvicide), and provision of safe drinking water (1,2). The eradication campaign began in 1980 at CDC (1). In 1986, with an estimated 3.5 million cases† occurring annually in 20 African and Asian countries§ (3), the World Health Assembly called for dracunculiasis elimination (4). The Guinea Worm Eradication Program (GWEP), led by The Carter Center and supported by the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, CDC, and other partners, began assisting ministries of health in countries with endemic disease. With 27 cases in humans reported in 2020, five during January-June 2021, and only six countries currently affected by dracunculiasis (Angola, Chad, Ethiopia, Mali, South Sudan, and importations into Cameroon), achievement of eradication appears to be close. However, dracunculiasis eradication is challenged by civil unrest, insecurity, and epidemiologic and zoologic concerns. Guinea worm infections in dogs were first reported in Chad in 2012. Animal infections have now overtaken human cases, with 1,601 reported animal infections in 2020 and 443 during January-June 2021. Currently, all national GWEPs remain fully operational, with precautions taken to ensure safety of program staff and community members in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of COVID-19, The Carter Center convened the 2020 and 2021 annual GWEP Program Managers meetings virtually, and WHO's International Commission for the Certification of Dracunculiasis Eradication met virtually in October 2020. Since 1986, WHO has certified 199 countries, areas, and territories dracunculiasis-free. Six countries are still affected: five with endemic disease and importations into Cameroon. Seven countries (five with endemic dracunculiasis, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Sudan) still lack certification (4). The existence of infected dogs, especially in Chad, and impeded access because of civil unrest and insecurity in Mali and South Sudan are now the greatest challenges to interrupting transmission. This report describes progress during January 2020-June 2021 and updates previous reports (2,4,5).


Subject(s)
Disease Eradication , Dracunculiasis/prevention & control , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Dracunculiasis/epidemiology , Humans
5.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 119, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incubation period is a crucial index of epidemiology in understanding the spread of the emerging Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we aimed to describe the incubation period of COVID-19 globally and in the mainland of China. METHODS: The searched studies were published from December 1, 2019 to May 26, 2021 in CNKI, Wanfang, PubMed, and Embase databases. A random-effect model was used to pool the mean incubation period. Meta-regression was used to explore the sources of heterogeneity. Meanwhile, we collected 11 545 patients in the mainland of China outside Hubei from January 19, 2020 to September 21, 2020. The incubation period fitted with the Log-normal model by the coarseDataTools package. RESULTS: A total of 3235 articles were searched, 53 of which were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled mean incubation period of COVID-19 was 6.0 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.6-6.5) globally, 6.5 days (95% CI 6.1-6.9) in the mainland of China, and 4.6 days (95% CI 4.1-5.1) outside the mainland of China (P = 0.006). The incubation period varied with age (P = 0.005). Meanwhile, in 11 545 patients, the mean incubation period was 7.1 days (95% CI 7.0-7.2), which was similar to the finding in our meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: For COVID-19, the mean incubation period was 6.0 days globally but near 7.0 days in the mainland of China, which will help identify the time of infection and make disease control decisions. Furthermore, attention should also be paid to the region- or age-specific incubation period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Observational Studies as Topic
8.
mBio ; 12(5): e0186421, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476393

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the world's vulnerability to biological catastrophe and elicited unprecedented scientific efforts. Some of this work and its derivatives, however, present dual-use risks (i.e., potential harm from misapplication of beneficial research) that have largely gone unaddressed. For instance, gain-of-function studies and reverse genetics protocols may facilitate the engineering of concerning SARS-CoV-2 variants and other pathogens. The risk of accidental or deliberate release of dangerous pathogens may be increased by large-scale collection and characterization of zoonotic viruses undertaken in an effort to understand what enables animal-to-human transmission. These concerns are exacerbated by the rise of preprint publishing that circumvents a late-stage opportunity for dual-use oversight. To prevent the next global health emergency, we must avoid inadvertently increasing the threat of future biological events. This requires a nuanced and proactive approach to dual-use evaluation throughout the research life cycle, including the conception, funding, conduct, and dissemination of research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Containment of Biohazards , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics
11.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(SI): SI68-SI76, 2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462487

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Given the COVID-19 pandemic, it is crucial to understand the underlying behavioural determinants of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy in patients with autoimmune or inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs). We aimed to analyse patterns of beliefs and intention regarding SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in AIIRD patients, as a mean of identifying pragmatic actions that could be taken to increase vaccine coverage in this population. METHODS: Data relating to 1258 AIIRD patients were analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models, to identify variables associated independently with willingness to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. Subsets of patients showing similar beliefs and intention about SARS-CoV-2 vaccination were characterized using cluster analysis. RESULTS: Hierarchical cluster analysis identified three distinct clusters of AIIRD patients. Three predominant patient attitudes to SARS-COV-2 vaccination were identified: voluntary, hesitant and suspicious. While vaccine willingness differed significantly across the three clusters (P < 0.0001), there was no significant difference regarding fear of getting COVID-19 (P = 0.11), the presence of comorbidities (P = 0.23), the use of glucocorticoids (P = 0.21), or immunocompromised status (P = 0.63). However, patients from cluster #2 (hesitant) and #3 (suspicious) were significantly more concerned about vaccination, the use of a new vaccine technology, lack of long-term data in relation to COVID-19 vaccination, and potential financial links with pharmaceutical companies (P < 0.0001 in all) than patients from cluster #1 (voluntary). DISCUSSION: Importantly, the differences between clusters in terms of patient beliefs and intention was not related to the fear of getting COVID-19 or to any state of frailty, but was related to specific concerns about vaccination. This study may serve as a basis for improved communication and thus help increase COVID-19 vaccine coverage among AIIRD patients.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , Cluster Analysis , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , Rheumatic Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(6): e1-e2, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461905
13.
Lancet Planet Health ; 5(10): e671-e680, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461903

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding how environmental factors affect SARS-CoV-2 transmission could inform global containment efforts. Despite high scientific and public interest and multiple research reports, there is currently no consensus on the association of environmental factors and SARS-CoV-2 transmission. To address this research gap, we aimed to assess the relative risk of transmission associated with weather conditions and ambient air pollution. METHODS: In this global analysis, we adjusted for the delay between infection and detection, estimated the daily reproduction number at 3739 global locations during the COVID-19 pandemic up until late April, 2020, and investigated its associations with daily local weather conditions (ie, temperature, humidity, precipitation, snowfall, moon illumination, sunlight hours, ultraviolet index, cloud cover, wind speed and direction, and pressure data) and ambient air pollution (ie, PM2·5, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and sulphur dioxide). To account for other confounding factors, we included both location-specific fixed effects and trends, controlling for between-location differences and heterogeneities in locations' responses over time. We built confidence in our estimations through synthetic data, robustness, and sensitivity analyses, and provided year-round global projections for weather-related risk of global SARS-CoV-2 transmission. FINDINGS: Our dataset included data collected between Dec 12, 2019, and April 22, 2020. Several weather variables and ambient air pollution were associated with the spread of SARS-CoV-2 across 3739 global locations. We found a moderate, negative relationship between the estimated reproduction number and temperatures warmer than 25°C (a decrease of 3·7% [95% CI 1·9-5·4] per additional degree), a U-shaped relationship with outdoor ultraviolet exposure, and weaker positive associations with air pressure, wind speed, precipitation, diurnal temperature, sulphur dioxide, and ozone. Results were robust to multiple assumptions. Independent research building on our estimates provides strong support for the resulting projections across nations. INTERPRETATION: Warmer temperature and moderate outdoor ultraviolet exposure result in a slight reduction in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2; however, changes in weather or air pollution alone are not enough to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2 with other factors having greater effects. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , COVID-19 , Global Health , Weather , Air Pollution/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Global Health ; 17(1): 117, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448243

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current pandemic of COVID-19 impacted the psychological wellbeing of populations globally. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the extent and identify factors associated with psychological distress, fear of COVID-19 and coping. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study across 17 countries during Jun-2020 to Jan-2021. Levels of psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale), fear of COVID-19 (Fear of COVID-19 Scale), and coping (Brief Resilient Coping Scale) were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 8,559 people participated; mean age (±SD) was 33(±13) years, 64% were females and 40% self-identified as frontline workers. More than two-thirds (69%) experienced moderate-to-very high levels of psychological distress, which was 46% in Thailand and 91% in Egypt. A quarter (24%) had high levels of fear of COVID-19, which was as low as 9% in Libya and as high as 38% in Bangladesh. More than half (57%) exhibited medium to high resilient coping; the lowest prevalence (3%) was reported in Australia and the highest (72%) in Syria. Being female (AOR 1.31 [95% CIs 1.09-1.57]), perceived distress due to change of employment status (1.56 [1.29-1.90]), comorbidity with mental health conditions (3.02 [1.20-7.60]) were associated with higher levels of psychological distress and fear. Doctors had higher psychological distress (1.43 [1.04-1.97]), but low levels of fear of COVID-19 (0.55 [0.41-0.76]); nurses had medium to high resilient coping (1.30 [1.03-1.65]). CONCLUSIONS: The extent of psychological distress, fear of COVID-19 and coping varied by country; however, we identified few higher risk groups who were more vulnerable than others. There is an urgent need to prioritise health and well-being of those people through well-designed intervention that may need to be tailored to meet country specific requirements.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
16.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 36, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The highly contagious nature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) places physicians in South Asia at high risk of contracting the infection. Accordingly, we conducted this study to provide an updated account of physician deaths in South Asia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to analyze and compare the different characteristics associated with physician mortality amongst the countries of the region. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study by using published news reports on the websites of news agencies from 9 selected countries in South Asia. Our study included only those physicians and doctors who died after contracting COVID-19 from their respective workplaces. All available data about the country of origin, type of, sex, age, medical or surgical specialty, and date of death were included. RESULTS: The total number of physician deaths reported due to COVID-19 in our study was 170, with half (87/170, 51%) of the deaths reported from Iran. Male physician deaths were reported to be 145 (145/170 = 85%). Internal Medicine (58.43%) was the most severely affected sub-specialty. The highest physician mortality rate in the general population recorded in Afghanistan (27/1000 deaths). General physicians from India [OR = 11.00(95% CI = 1.06-114.08), p = 0.045] and public sector medical practitioners from Pakistan [aOR = 4.52 (95% CI = 1.18-17.33), p = 0.028] were showing significant mortality when compared with other regions in multivariate logistic regression. CONCLUSION: An increased number of physician deaths, owing to COVID-19, has been shown in South Asia. This could be due to decreased personal protective equipment and the poor health care management systems of the countries in the region to combat the pandemic. Future studies should provide detailed information of characteristics associated with physician mortalities along with the main complications arising due to the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Occupational Diseases/mortality , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Aged , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Bhutan/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Indian Ocean Islands/epidemiology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
17.
J Public Health Policy ; 42(3): 355-358, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440504
18.
Lancet ; 398(10303): 870-905, 2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437623

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sustainable Development Goal 3.2 has targeted elimination of preventable child mortality, reduction of neonatal death to less than 12 per 1000 livebirths, and reduction of death of children younger than 5 years to less than 25 per 1000 livebirths, for each country by 2030. To understand current rates, recent trends, and potential trajectories of child mortality for the next decade, we present the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019 findings for all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality in children younger than 5 years of age, with multiple scenarios for child mortality in 2030 that include the consideration of potential effects of COVID-19, and a novel framework for quantifying optimal child survival. METHODS: We completed all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality analyses from 204 countries and territories for detailed age groups separately, with aggregated mortality probabilities per 1000 livebirths computed for neonatal mortality rate (NMR) and under-5 mortality rate (U5MR). Scenarios for 2030 represent different potential trajectories, notably including potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the potential impact of improvements preferentially targeting neonatal survival. Optimal child survival metrics were developed by age, sex, and cause of death across all GBD location-years. The first metric is a global optimum and is based on the lowest observed mortality, and the second is a survival potential frontier that is based on stochastic frontier analysis of observed mortality and Healthcare Access and Quality Index. FINDINGS: Global U5MR decreased from 71·2 deaths per 1000 livebirths (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 68·3-74·0) in 2000 to 37·1 (33·2-41·7) in 2019 while global NMR correspondingly declined more slowly from 28·0 deaths per 1000 live births (26·8-29·5) in 2000 to 17·9 (16·3-19·8) in 2019. In 2019, 136 (67%) of 204 countries had a U5MR at or below the SDG 3.2 threshold and 133 (65%) had an NMR at or below the SDG 3.2 threshold, and the reference scenario suggests that by 2030, 154 (75%) of all countries could meet the U5MR targets, and 139 (68%) could meet the NMR targets. Deaths of children younger than 5 years totalled 9·65 million (95% UI 9·05-10·30) in 2000 and 5·05 million (4·27-6·02) in 2019, with the neonatal fraction of these deaths increasing from 39% (3·76 million [95% UI 3·53-4·02]) in 2000 to 48% (2·42 million; 2·06-2·86) in 2019. NMR and U5MR were generally higher in males than in females, although there was no statistically significant difference at the global level. Neonatal disorders remained the leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years in 2019, followed by lower respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases, congenital birth defects, and malaria. The global optimum analysis suggests NMR could be reduced to as low as 0·80 (95% UI 0·71-0·86) deaths per 1000 livebirths and U5MR to 1·44 (95% UI 1·27-1·58) deaths per 1000 livebirths, and in 2019, there were as many as 1·87 million (95% UI 1·35-2·58; 37% [95% UI 32-43]) of 5·05 million more deaths of children younger than 5 years than the survival potential frontier. INTERPRETATION: Global child mortality declined by almost half between 2000 and 2019, but progress remains slower in neonates and 65 (32%) of 204 countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia, are not on track to meet either SDG 3.2 target by 2030. Focused improvements in perinatal and newborn care, continued and expanded delivery of essential interventions such as vaccination and infection prevention, an enhanced focus on equity, continued focus on poverty reduction and education, and investment in strengthening health systems across the development spectrum have the potential to substantially improve U5MR. Given the widespread effects of COVID-19, considerable effort will be required to maintain and accelerate progress. FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


Subject(s)
Child Mortality/trends , Global Health/trends , Infant Mortality/trends , Sustainable Development , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cause of Death/trends , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Life Tables , Male , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Global Health ; 17(1): 113, 2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435257

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic generated by Covid-19 has changed the way of life of citizens around the world in a short time, affecting all areas of society directly or indirectly, which is facing a global health crisis with different national responses implemented by governments. Several months into the pandemic, the first after-effects of Covid-19 are beginning to be felt by citizens, who are questioning the management carried out so far. In order to improve the performance of governmental decisions to reduce the impact of the pandemic during the coming months, we calculated the levels of efficiency in the management of health resources. In addition, we identify some country characteristics that may condition efficient management. RESULTS: We obtained significant differences according to the geographical location of the country, with European and American countries being less efficient than Asian and African countries. Likewise, we can affirm that greater freedom of expression, a higher median age and an unstable economy and labor market reduce efficiency. However, female leadership of the government and greater compliance with the rule of law offer more efficient management, as do countries that derive more revenues from tourism. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide an opportunity for political leaders to reflect on their management during these months of the pandemic in order to identify mistakes and improve the implementation of effective measures. It has been shown that using more resources does not mean managing better; therefore, policymakers need to pay special attention to the use of resources, taking into account the budgetary constraints of the public sector.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Government , Pandemics/prevention & control , Africa/epidemiology , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Geography , Humans , Politics , United States/epidemiology
20.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(5): 378-385, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394714

ABSTRACT

Background: Infectious diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As of 2018, the total world population of children < 5 years of age was roughly estimated at 679 million. Of these children, an estimated 5.3 million died of all causes in 2018, with an estimated 700,000 who died of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases; 99% of the children who died had lived in low- and middle-income countries. The infectious diseases that remain major causes of mortality for which vaccines have been shown to provide proven preventive success include, in order of prevalence, are those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Rotavirus, Bordetella pertussis, measles virus, Haemophilus influenzae type b and influenza virus. Objective: The purpose of the present report was to address the global burden of these six vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in children < 5 years of age, together with implications for the prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection in children. Methods: The current immunization strategies for the prevention of the six vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in children are reviewed as a framework for new strategies of vaccine prevention of COVID-19 in children. Results: The burden of addressing vaccine prevention of future infectious disease in children can be effectively pursued through knowledge gained from past experiences with vaccine usage in these six vaccine-preventable childhood infectious diseases. Conclusion: Issues with regard to the burden of disease mortality, disease transmission, and available vaccines as well as vaccine successes and shortcomings for specific pathogens can serve as important landmarks for effective use of future vaccines. Although much success has been made globally in preventing these childhood deaths, much remains to be done.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Mass Vaccination , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Mortality , Child, Preschool , Cost of Illness , Developing Countries , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infant , Infant Mortality , Infant, Newborn , Male , Prevalence , Vaccination Refusal , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/prevention & control
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