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1.
Trials ; 22(1): 172, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622253

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that administration of dexamethasone 20 mg is superior to a 6 mg dose in adult patients with moderate or severe ARDS due to confirmed COVID-19. The secondary objective is to investigate the efficacy and safety of dexamethasone 20 mg versus dexamethasone 6 mg. The exploratory objective of this study is to assess long-term consequences on mortality and quality of life at 180 and 360 days. TRIAL DESIGN: REMED is a prospective, phase II, open-label, randomised controlled trial testing superiority of dexamethasone 20 mg vs 6 mg. The trial aims to be pragmatic, i.e. designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention in conditions that are close to real-life routine clinical practice. PARTICIPANTS: The study is multi-centre and will be conducted in the intensive care units (ICUs) of ten university hospitals in the Czech Republic. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Subjects will be eligible for the trial if they meet all of the following criteria: 1. Adult (≥18 years of age) at time of enrolment; 2. Present COVID-19 (infection confirmed by RT-PCR or antigen testing); 3. Intubation/mechanical ventilation or ongoing high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy; 4. Moderate or severe ARDS according to Berlin criteria: • Moderate - PaO2/FiO2 100-200 mmHg; • Severe - PaO2/FiO2 < 100 mmHg; 5. Admission to ICU in the last 24 hours. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Subjects will not be eligible for the trial if they meet any of the following criteria: 1. Known allergy/hypersensitivity to dexamethasone or excipients of the investigational medicinal product (e.g. parabens, benzyl alcohol); 2. Fulfilled criteria for ARDS for ≥14 days at enrolment; 3. Pregnancy or breastfeeding; 4. Unwillingness to comply with contraception measurements from enrolment until at least 1 week after the last dose of dexamethasone (sexual abstinence is considered an adequate contraception method); 5. End-of-life decision or patient is expected to die within next 24 hours; 6. Decision not to intubate or ceilings of care in place; 7. Immunosuppression and/or immunosuppressive drugs in medical history: a) Systemic immunosuppressive drugs or chemotherapy in the past 30 days; b) Systemic corticosteroid use before hospitalization; c) Any dose of dexamethasone during the present hospital stay for COVID-19 for ≥5 days before enrolment; d) Systemic corticosteroids during present hospital stay for conditions other than COVID-19 (e.g. septic shock); 8. Current haematological or generalized solid malignancy; 9. Any contraindication for corticosteroid administration, e.g. • intractable hyperglycaemia; • active gastrointestinal bleeding; • adrenal gland disorders; • presence of superinfection diagnosed with locally established clinical and laboratory criteria without adequate antimicrobial treatment; 10. Cardiac arrest before ICU admission; 11. Participation in another interventional trial in the last 30 days. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Dexamethasone solution for injection/infusion is the investigational medicinal product as well as the comparator. The trial will assess two doses, 20 mg (investigational) vs 6 mg (comparator). Patients in the intervention group will receive dexamethasone 20 mg intravenously once daily on day 1-5, followed by dexamethasone 10 mg intravenously once daily on day 6-10. Patients in the control group will receive dexamethasone 6 mg day 1-10. All authorized medicinal products containing dexamethasone in the form of solution for i.v. injection/infusion can be used. MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary endpoint: Number of ventilator-free days (VFDs) at 28 days after randomisation, defined as being alive and free from mechanical ventilation. SECONDARY ENDPOINTS: a) Mortality from any cause at 60 days after randomisation; b) Dynamics of inflammatory marker (C-Reactive Protein, CRP) change from Day 1 to Day 14; c) WHO Clinical Progression Scale at Day 14; d) Adverse events related to corticosteroids (new infections, new thrombotic complications) until Day 28 or hospital discharge; e) Independence at 90 days after randomisation assessed by Barthel Index. The long-term outcomes of this study are to assess long-term consequences on mortality and quality of life at 180 and 360 days through telephone structured interviews using the Barthel Index. RANDOMISATION: Randomisation will be carried out within the electronic case report form (eCRF) by the stratified permuted block randomisation method. Allocation sequences will be prepared by a statistician independent of the study team. Allocation to the treatment arm of an individual patient will not be available to the investigators before completion of the whole randomisation process. The following stratification factors will be applied: • Age <65 and ≥ 65; • Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI) <3 and ≥3; • CRP <150 mg/L and ≥150 mg/L • Trial centre. Patients will be randomised in a 1 : 1 ratio into one of the two treatment arms. Randomisation through the eCRF will be available 24 hours every day. BLINDING (MASKING): This is an open-label trial in which the participants and the study staff will be aware of the allocated intervention. Blinded pre-planned statistical analysis will be performed. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): The sample size is calculated to detect the difference of 3 VFDs at 28 days (primary efficacy endpoint) between the two treatment arms with a two-sided type I error of 0.05 and power of 80%. Based on data from a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in COVID-19 ARDS patients in Brazil and a multi-centre observational study from French and Belgian ICUs regarding moderate to severe ARDS related to COVID-19, investigators assumed a standard deviation of VFD at 28 days as 9. Using these assumptions, a total of 142 patients per treatment arm would be needed. After adjustment for a drop-out rate, 150 per treatment arm (300 patients per study) will be enrolled. TRIAL STATUS: This is protocol version 1.1, 15.01.2021. The trial is due to start on 2 February 2021 and recruitment is expected to be completed by December 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study protocol was registered on EudraCT No.:2020-005887-70, and on December 11, 2020 on ClinicalTrials.gov (Title: Effect of Two Different Doses of Dexamethasone in Patients With ARDS and COVID-19 (REMED)) Identifier: NCT04663555 with a last update posted on February 1, 2021. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol (version 1.1) is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest of expediting dissemination of this material, the standard formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Disease Progression , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Equivalence Trials as Topic , Humans , Length of Stay , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Lancet ; 398(10303): 843-855, 2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599473

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A previous efficacy trial found benefit from inhaled budesonide for COVID-19 in patients not admitted to hospital, but effectiveness in high-risk individuals is unknown. We aimed to establish whether inhaled budesonide reduces time to recovery and COVID-19-related hospital admissions or deaths among people at high risk of complications in the community. METHODS: PRINCIPLE is a multicentre, open-label, multi-arm, randomised, controlled, adaptive platform trial done remotely from a central trial site and at primary care centres in the UK. Eligible participants were aged 65 years or older or 50 years or older with comorbidities, and unwell for up to 14 days with suspected COVID-19 but not admitted to hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to usual care, usual care plus inhaled budesonide (800 µg twice daily for 14 days), or usual care plus other interventions, and followed up for 28 days. Participants were aware of group assignment. The coprimary endpoints are time to first self-reported recovery and hospital admission or death related to COVID-19, within 28 days, analysed using Bayesian models. The primary analysis population included all eligible SARS-CoV-2-positive participants randomly assigned to budesonide, usual care, and other interventions, from the start of the platform trial until the budesonide group was closed. This trial is registered at the ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN86534580) and is ongoing. FINDINGS: The trial began enrolment on April 2, 2020, with randomisation to budesonide from Nov 27, 2020, until March 31, 2021, when the prespecified time to recovery superiority criterion was met. 4700 participants were randomly assigned to budesonide (n=1073), usual care alone (n=1988), or other treatments (n=1639). The primary analysis model includes 2530 SARS-CoV-2-positive participants, with 787 in the budesonide group, 1069 in the usual care group, and 974 receiving other treatments. There was a benefit in time to first self-reported recovery of an estimated 2·94 days (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] 1·19 to 5·12) in the budesonide group versus the usual care group (11·8 days [95% BCI 10·0 to 14·1] vs 14·7 days [12·3 to 18·0]; hazard ratio 1·21 [95% BCI 1·08 to 1·36]), with a probability of superiority greater than 0·999, meeting the prespecified superiority threshold of 0·99. For the hospital admission or death outcome, the estimated rate was 6·8% (95% BCI 4·1 to 10·2) in the budesonide group versus 8·8% (5·5 to 12·7) in the usual care group (estimated absolute difference 2·0% [95% BCI -0·2 to 4·5]; odds ratio 0·75 [95% BCI 0·55 to 1·03]), with a probability of superiority 0·963, below the prespecified superiority threshold of 0·975. Two participants in the budesonide group and four in the usual care group had serious adverse events (hospital admissions unrelated to COVID-19). INTERPRETATION: Inhaled budesonide improves time to recovery, with a chance of also reducing hospital admissions or deaths (although our results did not meet the superiority threshold), in people with COVID-19 in the community who are at higher risk of complications. FUNDING: National Institute of Health Research and United Kingdom Research Innovation.


Subject(s)
Budesonide/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Aged , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 181-188, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575964

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the effect of corticosteroids and heparin, respectively, on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients' CD8+ T cells and D-dimer. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study involving 866 participants diagnosed with COVID-19, patients were grouped by severity. Generalized additive models were established to explore the time-course association of representative parameters of coagulation, inflammation and immunity. Segmented regression was performed to examine the influence of corticosteroids and heparin upon CD8+ T cell and D-dimer, respectively. RESULTS: There were 541 moderate, 169 severe and 156 critically ill patients involved in the study. Synchronous changes of levels of NLR, D-dimer and CD8+ T cell in critically ill patients were observed. Administration of methylprednisolone before 14 DFS compared with those after 14 DFS (ß = 0.154%, 95% CI=(0, 0.302), p=.048) or a dose lower than 40 mg per day compared with those equals to 40 mg per day (ß = 0.163%, 95% CI=(0.027, 0.295), p=.020) significantly increased the rising rate of CD8+ T cell in 14-56 DFS. CONCLUSIONS: The parameters of coagulation, inflammation and immunity were longitudinally correlated, and an early low-dose corticosteroid treatment accelerated the regaining of CD8+ T cell to help battle against SARS-Cov-2 in critical cases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Inflammation/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/immunology , Heparin/administration & dosage , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Linear Models , Longitudinal Studies , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
5.
JAMA ; 326(18): 1807-1817, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527380

ABSTRACT

Importance: A daily dose with 6 mg of dexamethasone is recommended for up to 10 days in patients with severe and critical COVID-19, but a higher dose may benefit those with more severe disease. Objective: To assess the effects of 12 mg/d vs 6 mg/d of dexamethasone in patients with COVID-19 and severe hypoxemia. Design, Setting, and Participants: A multicenter, randomized clinical trial was conducted between August 2020 and May 2021 at 26 hospitals in Europe and India and included 1000 adults with confirmed COVID-19 requiring at least 10 L/min of oxygen or mechanical ventilation. End of 90-day follow-up was on August 19, 2021. Interventions: Patients were randomized 1:1 to 12 mg/d of intravenous dexamethasone (n = 503) or 6 mg/d of intravenous dexamethasone (n = 497) for up to 10 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the number of days alive without life support (invasive mechanical ventilation, circulatory support, or kidney replacement therapy) at 28 days and was adjusted for stratification variables. Of the 8 prespecified secondary outcomes, 5 are included in this analysis (the number of days alive without life support at 90 days, the number of days alive out of the hospital at 90 days, mortality at 28 days and at 90 days, and ≥1 serious adverse reactions at 28 days). Results: Of the 1000 randomized patients, 982 were included (median age, 65 [IQR, 55-73] years; 305 [31%] women) and primary outcome data were available for 971 (491 in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group and 480 in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group). The median number of days alive without life support was 22.0 days (IQR, 6.0-28.0 days) in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group and 20.5 days (IQR, 4.0-28.0 days) in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted mean difference, 1.3 days [95% CI, 0-2.6 days]; P = .07). Mortality at 28 days was 27.1% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 32.3% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.86 [99% CI, 0.68-1.08]). Mortality at 90 days was 32.0% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 37.7% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.87 [99% CI, 0.70-1.07]). Serious adverse reactions, including septic shock and invasive fungal infections, occurred in 11.3% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 13.4% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.83 [99% CI, 0.54-1.29]). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with COVID-19 and severe hypoxemia, 12 mg/d of dexamethasone compared with 6 mg/d of dexamethasone did not result in statistically significantly more days alive without life support at 28 days. However, the trial may have been underpowered to identify a significant difference. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04509973 and ctri.nic.in Identifier: CTRI/2020/10/028731.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Life Support Care , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , Shock, Septic/etiology , Single-Blind Method
6.
JAMA ; 326(18): 1807-1817, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482066

ABSTRACT

Importance: A daily dose with 6 mg of dexamethasone is recommended for up to 10 days in patients with severe and critical COVID-19, but a higher dose may benefit those with more severe disease. Objective: To assess the effects of 12 mg/d vs 6 mg/d of dexamethasone in patients with COVID-19 and severe hypoxemia. Design, Setting, and Participants: A multicenter, randomized clinical trial was conducted between August 2020 and May 2021 at 26 hospitals in Europe and India and included 1000 adults with confirmed COVID-19 requiring at least 10 L/min of oxygen or mechanical ventilation. End of 90-day follow-up was on August 19, 2021. Interventions: Patients were randomized 1:1 to 12 mg/d of intravenous dexamethasone (n = 503) or 6 mg/d of intravenous dexamethasone (n = 497) for up to 10 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the number of days alive without life support (invasive mechanical ventilation, circulatory support, or kidney replacement therapy) at 28 days and was adjusted for stratification variables. Of the 8 prespecified secondary outcomes, 5 are included in this analysis (the number of days alive without life support at 90 days, the number of days alive out of the hospital at 90 days, mortality at 28 days and at 90 days, and ≥1 serious adverse reactions at 28 days). Results: Of the 1000 randomized patients, 982 were included (median age, 65 [IQR, 55-73] years; 305 [31%] women) and primary outcome data were available for 971 (491 in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group and 480 in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group). The median number of days alive without life support was 22.0 days (IQR, 6.0-28.0 days) in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group and 20.5 days (IQR, 4.0-28.0 days) in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted mean difference, 1.3 days [95% CI, 0-2.6 days]; P = .07). Mortality at 28 days was 27.1% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 32.3% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.86 [99% CI, 0.68-1.08]). Mortality at 90 days was 32.0% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 37.7% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.87 [99% CI, 0.70-1.07]). Serious adverse reactions, including septic shock and invasive fungal infections, occurred in 11.3% in the 12 mg of dexamethasone group vs 13.4% in the 6 mg of dexamethasone group (adjusted relative risk, 0.83 [99% CI, 0.54-1.29]). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with COVID-19 and severe hypoxemia, 12 mg/d of dexamethasone compared with 6 mg/d of dexamethasone did not result in statistically significantly more days alive without life support at 28 days. However, the trial may have been underpowered to identify a significant difference. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04509973 and ctri.nic.in Identifier: CTRI/2020/10/028731.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Life Support Care , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , Shock, Septic/etiology , Single-Blind Method
7.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 705214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448725

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a global health crisis affecting millions of people worldwide. SARS-CoV-2 enters the host cells by binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) after being cleaved by the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2). In addition to the lung, gastrointestinal tract and kidney, ACE2 is also extensively expressed in endocrine tissues, including the pituitary and adrenal glands. Although glucocorticoids could play a central role as immunosuppressants during the cytokine storm, they can have both stimulating and inhibitory effects on immune response, depending on the timing of their administration and their circulating levels. Patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI) or Cushing's syndrome (CS) are therefore vulnerable groups in relation to COVID-19. Additionally, patients with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) could also be more vulnerable to COVID-19 due to the immunosuppressive state caused by the cancer itself, by secreted glucocorticoids, and by anticancer treatments. This review comprehensively summarizes the current literature on susceptibility to and outcome of COVID-19 in AI, CS and ACC patients and emphasizes potential pathophysiological mechanisms of susceptibility to COVID-19 as well as the management of these patients in case of SARS-CoV-2. Finally, by performing an in silico analysis, we describe the mRNA expression of ACE2, TMPRSS2 and the genes encoding their co-receptors CTSB, CTSL and FURIN in normal adrenal and adrenocortical tumors (both adenomas and carcinomas).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Adrenal Insufficiency/complications , Adrenal Insufficiency/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cushing Syndrome/complications , Cushing Syndrome/immunology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 15: 17534666211042533, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440885

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to assess the effect of a short-term treatment with low-moderate corticosteroid (CS) doses by both a quantitative and qualitative assessment of chest HRCT of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: CORTICOVID is a single-center, cross-sectional, retrospective study involving severe/critical COVID-19 patients with mild/moderate ARDS. Lung total severity score was obtained according to Chung and colleagues. Moreover, the relative percentages of lung total severity score by ground glass opacities, consolidations, crazy paving, and linear bands were computed. Chest HRCT scores, P/F ratio, and laboratory parameters were evaluated before (pre-CS) and 7-10 days after (post-CS) methylprednisolone of 0.5-0.8 mg/kg/day. FINDINGS: A total of 34 severe/critical COVID-19 patients were included in the study, of which 17 received Standard of Care (SoC) and 17 CS therapy in add-on. CS treatment disclosed a significant decrease in HRCT total severity score [median = 6 (IQR: 5-7.5) versus 10 (IQR: 9-13) in SoC, p < 0.001], as well in single consolidations [median = 0.33 (IQR: 0-0.92) versus 6.73 (IQR: 2.49-8.03) in SoC, p < 0.001] and crazy paving scores [mean = 0.19 (SD = 0.53) versus 1.79 (SD = 2.71) in SoC, p = 0.010], along with a significant increase in linear bands [mean = 2.56 (SD = 1.65) versus 0.97 (SD = 1.30) in SoC, p = 0.006]. GGO score instead did not significantly differ at the end of treatment between the two groups. Most post-CS GGO, however, derived from previous consolidations and crazy paving [median = 1.5 (0.35-3.81) versus 2 (1.25-3.8) pre-CS; p = 0.579], while pre-CS GGO significantly decreased after methylprednisolone therapy [median = 0.66 (0.05-1.33) versus 1.5 (0.35-3.81) pre-CS; p = 0.004]. CS therapy further determined a significant improvement in P/F levels [median P/F = 310 (IQR: 235.5-370) versus 136 (IQR: 98.5-211.75) in SoC; p < 0.001], and a significant increase in white blood cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils absolute values. CONCLUSION: The improvement of all chest HRCT findings further supports the role of CS adjunctive therapy in severe/critical COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
9.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256977, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394551

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Although most patients with COVID-19 develop asymptomatic or mild disease, some patients develop severe disease. The effectiveness of various therapeutic agents, including antiviral drugs, steroids, and anti-inflammatories for COVID-19, have been being confirmed. The effect of administering steroids in early disease is unclear. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and risk of exacerbation of steroids administered preceding antiviral drugs in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This retrospective, single-center, observational study included consecutive patients with COVID-19 between March 2020 and March 2021. Patients were divided into a steroids-first group and antiviral-drugs-first group. Mortality, duration of hospitalization, incidence rate and duration of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, intubation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) induction of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients were admitted during the study period. After excluding patients who received symptomatic treatment only, who were taking immunosuppressive drugs, or who were administered antiviral drugs only, 68 patients were included in the analysis, 16 in the steroids-first group and 52 in the antiviral-drugs-first group. The rate of intubation, ICU admission and ECMO induction were significantly higher in the steroids-first group than in the antiviral-drugs-first group (81.3% vs. 33.3, p<0.001, 75.0% vs. 29.4%, p = 0.001, and 31.3% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.017, respectively). Furthermore, patients who received steroids within ten days after starting antiviral drugs had significantly lower rates of ICU admission, intubation, and ECMO induction. (81.3% vs. 42.9% p = 0.011, 75.0% vs. 37.1% p = 0.012, and 31.3% vs. 8.6% p = 0.039, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Administering steroids prior to antiviral drugs soon after symptom onset can aggravate disease severity. When administration of steroids is considered soon after symptom onset, it may be safer to initiate antiviral drugs first.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Aged , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
10.
Respir Med ; 187: 106571, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347816

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic, clinical, radiological and histopathological features consistent with viral-induced organizing pneumonia (OP) have been reported as hallmark characteristics of the disease. Here, we describe the case of ten patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia treated with methylprednisolone 1mg/kg for showing clinical and radiological features suggestive of OP at least 20 days after symptom onset and despite standard treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Aged , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology
11.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(7): 763-772, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337037

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple early reports of patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 showed that patients with chronic respiratory disease were significantly under-represented in these cohorts. We hypothesised that the widespread use of inhaled glucocorticoids among these patients was responsible for this finding, and tested if inhaled glucocorticoids would be an effective treatment for early COVID-19. METHODS: We performed an open-label, parallel-group, phase 2, randomised controlled trial (Steroids in COVID-19; STOIC) of inhaled budesonide, compared with usual care, in adults within 7 days of the onset of mild COVID-19 symptoms. The trial was done in the community in Oxfordshire, UK. Participants were randomly assigned to inhaled budsonide or usual care stratified for age (≤40 years or >40 years), sex (male or female), and number of comorbidities (≤1 and ≥2). Randomisation was done using random sequence generation in block randomisation in a 1:1 ratio. Budesonide dry powder was delivered using a turbohaler at a dose of 400 µg per actuation. Participants were asked to take two inhalations twice a day until symptom resolution. The primary endpoint was COVID-19-related urgent care visit, including emergency department assessment or hospitalisation, analysed for both the per-protocol and intention-to-treat (ITT) populations. The secondary outcomes were self-reported clinical recovery (symptom resolution), viral symptoms measured using the Common Cold Questionnare (CCQ) and the InFLUenza Patient Reported Outcome Questionnaire (FLUPro), body temperature, blood oxygen saturations, and SARS-CoV-2 viral load. The trial was stopped early after independent statistical review concluded that study outcome would not change with further participant enrolment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04416399. FINDINGS: From July 16 to Dec 9, 2020, 167 participants were recruited and assessed for eligibility. 21 did not meet eligibility criteria and were excluded. 146 participants were randomly assigned-73 to usual care and 73 to budesonide. For the per-protocol population (n=139), the primary outcome occurred in ten (14%) of 70 participants in the usual care group and one (1%) of 69 participants in the budesonide group (difference in proportions 0·131, 95% CI 0·043 to 0·218; p=0·004). For the ITT population, the primary outcome occurred in 11 (15%) participants in the usual care group and two (3%) participants in the budesonide group (difference in proportions 0·123, 95% CI 0·033 to 0·213; p=0·009). The number needed to treat with inhaled budesonide to reduce COVID-19 deterioration was eight. Clinical recovery was 1 day shorter in the budesonide group compared with the usual care group (median 7 days [95% CI 6 to 9] in the budesonide group vs 8 days [7 to 11] in the usual care group; log-rank test p=0·007). The mean proportion of days with a fever in the first 14 days was lower in the budesonide group (2%, SD 6) than the usual care group (8%, SD 18; Wilcoxon test p=0·051) and the proportion of participants with at least 1 day of fever was lower in the budesonide group when compared with the usual care group. As-needed antipyretic medication was required for fewer proportion of days in the budesonide group compared with the usual care group (27% [IQR 0-50] vs 50% [15-71]; p=0·025) Fewer participants randomly assigned to budesonide had persistent symptoms at days 14 and 28 compared with participants receiving usual care (difference in proportions 0·204, 95% CI 0·075 to 0·334; p=0·003). The mean total score change in the CCQ and FLUPro over 14 days was significantly better in the budesonide group compared with the usual care group (CCQ mean difference -0·12, 95% CI -0·21 to -0·02 [p=0·016]; FLUPro mean difference -0·10, 95% CI -0·21 to -0·00 [p=0·044]). Blood oxygen saturations and SARS-CoV-2 load, measured by cycle threshold, were not different between the groups. Budesonide was safe, with only five (7%) participants reporting self-limiting adverse events. INTERPRETATION: Early administration of inhaled budesonide reduced the likelihood of needing urgent medical care and reduced time to recovery after early COVID-19. FUNDING: National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre and AstraZeneca.


Subject(s)
Budesonide/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Time Factors , Young Adult
12.
Ann Neurol ; 90(2): 315-318, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330296

ABSTRACT

Although SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are very safe, we report 4 cases of the bifacial weakness with paresthesias variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring within 3 weeks of vaccination with the Oxford-AstraZeneca SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. This rare neurological syndrome has previously been reported in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection itself. Our cases were given either intravenous immunoglobulin, oral steroids, or no treatment. We suggest vigilance for cases of bifacial weakness with paresthesias variant GBS following vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 and that postvaccination surveillance programs ensure robust data capture of this outcome, to assess for causality. ANN NEUROL 2021;90:315-318.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/chemically induced , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisolone/administration & dosage , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
13.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD013876, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Olfactory dysfunction is an early and sensitive marker of COVID-19 infection. Although self-limiting in the majority of cases, when hyposmia or anosmia persists it can have a profound effect on quality of life. Little guidance exists on the treatment of post-COVID-19 olfactory dysfunction, however several strategies have been proposed from the evidence relating to the treatment of post-viral anosmia (such as medication or olfactory training). OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions that have been used, or proposed, to treat persisting olfactory dysfunction due to COVID-19 infection. A secondary objective is to keep the evidence up-to-date, using a living systematic review approach.  SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register; Cochrane ENT Register; CENTRAL; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished studies. The date of the search was 16 December 2020. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials including participants who had symptoms of olfactory disturbance following COVID-19 infection. Only individuals who had symptoms for at least four weeks were included in this review. Studies compared any intervention with no treatment or placebo. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Primary outcomes were the recovery of sense of smell, disease-related quality of life and serious adverse effects. Secondary outcomes were the change in sense of smell, general quality of life, prevalence of parosmia and other adverse effects (including nosebleeds/bloody discharge). We used GRADE to assess the certainty of the evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: We included one study with 18 participants, which compared the use of a 15-day course of oral steroids combined with nasal irrigation (consisting of an intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant solution) with no intervention. Psychophysical testing was used to assess olfactory function at baseline, 20 and 40 days. Systemic corticosteroids plus intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant compared to no intervention Recovery of sense of smell was assessed after 40 days (25 days after cessation of treatment) using the Connecticut Chemosensory Clinical Research Center (CCCRC) score. This tool has a range of 0 to 100, and a score of ≥ 90 represents normal olfactory function. The evidence is very uncertain about the effect of this intervention on recovery of the sense of smell at one to three months (5/9 participants in the intervention group scored ≥ 90 compared to 0/9 in the control group; risk ratio (RR) 11.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70 to 173.66; 1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Change in sense of smell was assessed using the CCCRC score at 40 days. This study reported an improvement in sense of smell in the intervention group from baseline (median improvement in CCCRC score 60, interquartile range (IQR) 40) compared to the control group (median improvement in CCCRC score 30, IQR 25) (1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Serious adverse events andother adverse events were not identified in any participants of this study; however, it is unclear how these outcomes were assessed and recorded (1 study; 18 participants; very low-certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is very limited evidence available on the efficacy and harms of treatments for persistent olfactory dysfunction following COVID-19 infection. However, we have identified other ongoing trials in this area. As this is a living systematic review we will update the data regularly, as new results become available. For this (first) version of the living review we identified only one study with a small sample size, which assessed systemic steroids and nasal irrigation (intranasal steroid/mucolytic/decongestant). However, the evidence regarding the benefits and harms from this intervention to treat persistent post-COVID-19 olfactory dysfunction is very uncertain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Expectorants/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Nasal Decongestants/administration & dosage , Olfaction Disorders/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Ambroxol/administration & dosage , Betamethasone/administration & dosage , Bias , Humans , Nasal Lavage/methods , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prevalence , Quality of Life , Recovery of Function , Smell/drug effects , Time Factors
14.
Respirology ; 26(8): 804-811, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280372

ABSTRACT

Bushfires and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) were dominate features of 2020. Patients with asthma were significantly affected by the 2019/2020 bushfire season with an increased burden compared to the general population. Patients with controlled asthma do not appear to be at higher risk of severe COVID-19 infection or death than the general population. Personalized medicine is proposed as the next era for asthma management, with treatable traits as a strategy to implement personalized medicine into practice. Patient engagement in personalized medicine strategies is important and needs to be further explored. Oral corticosteroid (OCS) use in asthma is common and contributes a major burden. OCS stewardship is recommended. Biologic therapies reduce exacerbations of severe asthma and biomarkers can be used to predict treatment responders. Epithelia at mucosal and cutaneous surfaces are components in asthma pathogenesis, through airway immunity and inflammation. Dysregulation of resident microbial communities in the lung, gut and skin microbiome is relevant to asthma pathogenesis, but there are still many unknowns in this field.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Administration, Oral , Asthma/drug therapy , Comorbidity , Humans , Pandemics , Precision Medicine
15.
Ann Neurol ; 90(2): 315-318, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265368

ABSTRACT

Although SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are very safe, we report 4 cases of the bifacial weakness with paresthesias variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring within 3 weeks of vaccination with the Oxford-AstraZeneca SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. This rare neurological syndrome has previously been reported in association with SARS-CoV-2 infection itself. Our cases were given either intravenous immunoglobulin, oral steroids, or no treatment. We suggest vigilance for cases of bifacial weakness with paresthesias variant GBS following vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 and that postvaccination surveillance programs ensure robust data capture of this outcome, to assess for causality. ANN NEUROL 2021;90:315-318.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/chemically induced , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisolone/administration & dosage , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
16.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 77(22): 1893-1898, 2020 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254423

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the search for ways in which to provide the best available care have created unprecedented times in terms of rapidly evolving reports of available treatment options. The primary objective of our analysis was to categorize online, open-source guidance to determine how US institutions approached their recommendations for management of patients with COVID-19 in the early weeks of the pandemic. METHODS: A search for open-source, online institutional guidelines for the treatment of COVID-19 was conducted using predefined criteria. The search was limited to the United States and conducted from April 12 through 14, 2020, and again on April 22, 2020. Searches were conducted at 2 points in time in order to identify changes in treatment recommendations due to evolving literature or institutional experience. Treatment recommendations, including guidance on antiviral therapy, corticosteroid and interleukin-6 inhibitor use, and nutritional supplementation were compared. RESULTS: Of the 105 institutions that met initial screening criteria, 14 institutions (13.3%) had online COVID-19 guidance available. Supportive care and clinical trial enrollment were the primary recommendations in all evaluated guidance. Recommendations to consider antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy varied. Eighty-six percent of guidelines contained recommendations for use, or consideration of use, of hydroxychloroquine. Guidance from 2 institutions mentioned use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin in combination. Of the 13 institutions listing hydroxychloroquine dosing recommendations, 62% recommended maintenance dosing of 200 mg twice daily. Infectious diseases or other specialty consultation was required by 89% of institutions using interleukin-6 inhibitors for COVID-19 management. CONCLUSION: Overall, the analysis revealed variability in treatment or supplemental pharmacologic therapy for the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination/standards , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics/prevention & control
17.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 273, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248412

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) is a deadly disease that was first seen in Wuhan, China, and primarily affects the respiratory system, but also has different systemic involvements. It has caused 89 million cases and 1.9 million deaths worldwide. COVID-19 positive renal transplant recipients have a higher mortality rate than COVID-19 patients in the normal population. There is no specific treatment and follow-up protocol for COVID-19 infection in transplant recipients. COVID-19 treatment and immunosuppressive therapy choices are controversial. Recently, pulse steroid therapies have been used in cases with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Convalescent plasma therapy is used limitedly in COVID-19 patients. Our 49-year-old male patient has been a recipient of a renal transplant from a cadaver for 6 years. We aimed to make an additional contribution by presenting our patient to the literature whose COVID-19 PCR-RT test performed in the emergency department due to the complaints of fever, shortness of breath, and cough for five days was positive and had moderate COVID-19 pneumonia in thorax tomography and had serious clinical and radiological improvement after pulsed methylprednisolone and convalescent plasma therapy in the early period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Kidney Transplantation , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pulse Therapy, Drug , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
18.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 106(7): e2469-e2479, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247625

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted healthcare environment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of the pandemic on self-reported outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI). DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective longitudinal survey study at 2 tertiary centers. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with AI. INTERVENTION: Patient-centered questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21, Short Form-36, and AI self-management. RESULTS: Of 342 patients, 157 (46%) had primary AI, 109 (32%) had secondary AI, and 76 (22%) had glucocorticoid-induced AI. When compared to prepandemic, daily glucocorticoid dose and number of adrenal crises did not change. However, patients reported a higher financial impact from AI (34% vs 23%, P = 0.006) and difficulty accessing medical care (31% vs 7%, P < 0.0001) during the pandemic. A third of patients reported difficulty managing AI during the pandemic. After adjusting for duration and subtypes of AI, younger patients [odds ratio (OR) 2.3, CI 95% 1.3-4.1], women (OR 3.7, CI 95% 1.9-7.1), poor healthcare access(OR 4.2, CI 95% 2.3-7.7), lack of good insurance support (OR 2.8, CI 95% 1.3-5.9), and those with a higher financial impact (OR 2.3, CI 95% 1.3-4.3) reported greater difficulties managing AI. Patients were more likely to report a higher anxiety score (≥8) if they found managing AI challenging during the pandemic (OR 3.0, CI 95% 1.3-6.9), and had lower Physical Component Summary (OR 4.9, CI 95% 2.2-11.0) and Mental Component Summary (OR 4.1, CI 95% 1.8-9.5) scores prior to the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: A third of patients with AI reported difficulties with management of AI during the pandemic, particularly in younger patients, women, and those with poor healthcare access.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Insufficiency/drug therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Self-Management/statistics & numerical data , Adrenal Insufficiency/economics , Adrenal Insufficiency/psychology , Age Factors , Aged , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Financial Stress/diagnosis , Financial Stress/epidemiology , Financial Stress/psychology , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Glucocorticoids/economics , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Health Questionnaire/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Self-Management/economics , Sex Factors , United States/epidemiology
19.
Lupus ; 30(9): 1515-1521, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247525

ABSTRACT

Immune thrombocytopenia, also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), has been reported as an important complication related to COVID-19.We present a 49-year-old male patient with systemic lupus erythematosus with lupus nephritis, antiphospholipid syndrome and history of ITP who developed an ITP flare in the context of COVID-19. He had no bleeding manifestations and had a good response to prednisone treatment.We review the characteristics of the cases reported to date in the literature, with an analysis of 57 patients. Mean age was 56 years (±19.6 SD), and 50.9% were male. This was the first episode of ITP in most of the patients (86.05%), with SARS-CoV-2 acting as the initial trigger. We found that ITP flares may appear in both mild and severe COVID-19 cases. They also appeared at any time during the course of the disease, 48.2% of patients developed it during hospitalization, while it was diagnosed at admission in the rest of the cases. Platelet counts were significantly lower than other ITP series, with a median nadir platelet count of 8 × 109/L (IQR 2-17.75 × 109/L). These patients show a higher bleeding rate (61.4%) compared with other ITP series. They also show a better response to treatment, with good response to the first line therapies in 76.9% of them. The most common first-line treatment was intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), used alone or combined with corticosteroids in 40.4% and 32.7% of cases respectively, while 25% of patients received only corticosteroids.Our review suggests that COVID-19-related ITP can be seen even in previously healthy patients. Clinicians must be aware that ITP may appear both in mild and severe COVID-19, at any time during its course. Given that this kind of ITP seems to be associated with a higher bleeding risk, its diagnosis in a clinical scenario such as COVID-19, where anticoagulant therapy is frequently used, may be critical. Treatment with IVIG and/or corticoids is often effective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/virology , Treatment Outcome
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