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1.
Cell Rep ; 37(6): 109920, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530684

ABSTRACT

It is urgent to develop disease models to dissect mechanisms regulating severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, we derive airway organoids from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-AOs). The hPSC-AOs, particularly ciliated-like cells, are permissive to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Using this platform, we perform a high content screen and identify GW6471, which blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection. GW6471 can also block infection of the B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 variant. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis suggests that GW6471 blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection at least in part by inhibiting hypoxia inducible factor 1 subunit alpha (HIF1α), which is further validated by chemical inhibitor and genetic perturbation targeting HIF1α. Metabolic profiling identifies decreased rates of glycolysis upon GW6471 treatment, consistent with transcriptome profiling. Finally, xanthohumol, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid, and ND-646, three compounds that suppress fatty acid biosynthesis, also block SARS-CoV-2 infection. Together, a high content screen coupled with transcriptome and metabolic profiling reveals a key role of the HIF1α-glycolysis axis in mediating SARS-CoV-2 infection of human airway epithelium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Glycolysis/physiology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Organoids/metabolism , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Transcriptome/physiology , Vero Cells
2.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469382

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viruses are known to be the most frequent causative mediators of lung infections in humans, bearing significant impact on the host cell signaling machinery due to their host-dependency for efficient replication. Certain cellular functions are actively induced by respiratory viruses for their own benefit. This includes metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis (FAS) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, among others, which are modified during viral infections. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of metabolic pathway modifications mediated by the acute respiratory viruses respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV), influenza virus (IV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), coronavirus (CoV) and adenovirus (AdV), and highlight potential targets and compounds for therapeutic approaches.


Subject(s)
Citric Acid Cycle/physiology , Energy Metabolism/physiology , Fatty Acids/biosynthesis , Glycolysis/physiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Adenoviridae/metabolism , Coronavirus/metabolism , Humans , Orthomyxoviridae/metabolism , Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human/metabolism , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/metabolism , Rhinovirus/metabolism
3.
Life Sci Alliance ; 4(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389961

ABSTRACT

Viruses rely on their host for reproduction. Here, we made use of genomic and structural information to create a biomass function capturing the amino and nucleic acid requirements of SARS-CoV-2. Incorporating this biomass function into a stoichiometric metabolic model of the human lung cell and applying metabolic flux balance analysis, we identified host-based metabolic perturbations inhibiting SARS-CoV-2 reproduction. Our results highlight reactions in the central metabolism, as well as amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways. By incorporating host cellular maintenance into the model based on available protein expression data from human lung cells, we find that only few of these metabolic perturbations are able to selectively inhibit virus reproduction. Some of the catalysing enzymes of such reactions have demonstrated interactions with existing drugs, which can be used for experimental testing of the presented predictions using gene knockouts and RNA interference techniques. In summary, the developed computational approach offers a platform for rapid, experimentally testable generation of drug predictions against existing and emerging viruses based on their biomass requirements.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Lung , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biomass , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Culture Media/chemistry , Culture Media/metabolism , Glycolysis/physiology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Lung/cytology , Lung/metabolism , Metabolic Flux Analysis , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systems Biology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/physiology
4.
Biochimie ; 180: 169-177, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919731

ABSTRACT

Current mortality due to the Covid-19 pandemic (approximately 1.2 million by November 2020) demonstrates the lack of an effective treatment. As replication of many viruses - including MERS-CoV - is supported by enhanced aerobic glycolysis, we hypothesized that SARS-CoV-2 replication in host cells (especially airway cells) is reliant upon altered glucose metabolism. This metabolism is similar to the Warburg effect well studied in cancer. Counteracting two main pathways (PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signaling) sustaining aerobic glycolysis inhibits MERS-CoV replication and thus, very likely that of SARS-CoV-2, which shares many similarities with MERS-CoV. The Warburg effect appears to be involved in several steps of COVID-19 infection. Once induced by hypoxia, the Warburg effect becomes active in lung endothelial cells, particularly in the presence of atherosclerosis, thereby promoting vasoconstriction and micro thrombosis. Aerobic glycolysis also supports activation of pro-inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and M1 macrophages. As the anti-inflammatory response and reparative process is performed by M2 macrophages reliant on oxidative metabolism, we speculated that the switch to oxidative metabolism in M2 macrophages would not occur at the appropriate time due to an uncontrolled pro-inflammatory cascade. Aging, mitochondrial senescence and enzyme dysfunction, AMPK downregulation and p53 inactivation could all play a role in this key biochemical event. Understanding the role of the Warburg effect in COVID-19 can be essential to developing molecules reducing infectivity, arresting endothelial cells activation and the pro-inflammatory cascade.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Glycolysis/physiology , Inflammation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology
5.
Mol Med ; 26(1): 69, 2020 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635101

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We previously showed that the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) increases inflammatory cleaved caspase-1 activity in myocytes, and that caspase-1/11 is protective in sterile liver injury. However, the role of caspase-1/11 in the recovery of muscle from ischemia caused by peripheral arterial disease is unknown. We hypothesized that caspase-1/11 mediates recovery in muscle via effects on autophagy and this is modulated by CQ. METHODS: C57Bl/6 J (WT) and caspase-1/11 double-knockout (KO) mice underwent femoral artery ligation (a model of hind-limb ischemia) with or without CQ (50 mg/kg IP every 2nd day). CQ effects on autophagosome formation, microtubule associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3), and caspase-1 expression was measured using electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging documented perfusion every 7 days. After 21 days, in situ physiologic testing in tibialis anterior muscle assessed peak force contraction, and myocyte size and fibrosis was also measured. Muscle satellite cell (MuSC) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate was measured. Caspase-1 and glycolytic enzyme expression was detected by Western blot. RESULTS: CQ increased autophagosomes, LC3 consolidation, total caspase-1 expression and cleaved caspase-1 in muscle. Perfusion, fibrosis, myofiber regeneration, muscle contraction, MuSC fusion, OCR, ECAR and glycolytic enzyme expression was variably affected by CQ depending on presence of caspase-1/11. CQ decreased perfusion recovery, fibrosis and myofiber size in WT but not caspase-1/11KO mice. CQ diminished peak force in whole muscle, and myocyte fusion in MuSC and these effects were exacerbated in caspase-1/11KO mice. CQ reductions in maximal respiration and ATP production were reduced in caspase-1/11KO mice. Caspase-1/11KO MuSC had significant increases in protein kinase isoforms and aldolase with decreased ECAR. CONCLUSION: Caspase-1/11 signaling affects the response to ischemia in muscle and effects are variably modulated by CQ. This may be critically important for disease treated with CQ and its derivatives, including novel viral diseases (e.g. COVID-19) that are expected to affect patients with comorbidities like cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
Caspase 1/metabolism , Caspases, Initiator/metabolism , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Ischemia/pathology , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Animals , Autophagosomes/metabolism , Autophagy/drug effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glycolysis/physiology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/metabolism , Muscle Cells/metabolism , Muscle Development , Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism , Neovascularization, Physiologic , Oxidative Phosphorylation , Pandemics , Peripheral Arterial Disease/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Regeneration , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction
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