Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 20
Filter
1.
Pharmacol Res ; 178: 106138, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1693034

ABSTRACT

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) is a well-known natural herb used to treat different ailments since ancient times. Glycyrrhizin (GL), which is the primary triterpenoid compound of licorice extract, has been known to have broad-spectrum pharmacological effects. GL is cleaved into glucuronide and the aglycone, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), which exists in two stereoisomeric forms: 18α- and 18ß-GA. It is well documented that GL and GA have great potential as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective agents. Studies undertaken during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic suggest that GL is effective at inhibiting the viral replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The anticancer effects of GL and GA involve modulating various signaling pathways, such as the phosphatase and tensin homolog/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which are mainly involved in regulating cancer cell death, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The potential of GL and GA in preventing cancer development and suppressing the growth and invasion of different cancer types has been reviewed in this paper. This review also provides molecular insights on the mechanism of action for the oncopreventive and oncotherapeutic effects of GL and its derivative, GA, which could help develop more specific forms of these agents for clinical use.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , COVID-19 , Glycyrrhiza , Triterpenes , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Phytochemicals , Plant Extracts , Triterpenes/pharmacology , Triterpenes/therapeutic use
2.
Inflammation ; 45(1): 172-179, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474041

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (COVID-19) is associated with uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Loss of pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) function has been associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aberrant signalling and dysregulated inflammation characteristic of lung cancer have marked similarities with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Spearman's correlation analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets indicated an inverse correlation between ACE2 and IL6 in lung adenocarcinoma. qRT-PCR analysis revealed CoV-2-SRBD-mediated diminished ACE2 expression in lung cancer cells that was concomitant with increased IL6 expression. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis suggested that treatment with methotrexate (MTx) dampened CoV-2-SRBD-mediated increase in JAK1/STAT3 phosphorylation, gp130, IL6, and folate-binding protein (FBP) expressions. MTx also rescued the diminished expression of ACE2 in CoV-2-SRBD transfected cells. As lung tissue injury in severely affected COVID-19 patients is characterised by aberrant inflammatory response, repurposing MTx as an effective therapy against critical regulators of inflammation in SARS-CoV-2 infection warrants investigation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Methotrexate/therapeutic use , A549 Cells , Adenocarcinoma of Lung/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line, Tumor , Cytokine Receptor gp130/biosynthesis , Folate Receptor 2/biosynthesis , HMGB1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/immunology , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Phosphorylation/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463773

ABSTRACT

Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), also known as glycyrrhizin, is a triterpene glycoside isolated from plants of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice). GA possesses a wide range of pharmacological and antiviral activities against enveloped viruses including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus. Since the S protein (S) mediates SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) cell attachment and cell entry, we assayed the GA effect on SARS-CoV-2 infection using an S protein-pseudotyped lentivirus (Lenti-S). GA treatment dose-dependently blocked Lenti-S infection. We showed that incubation of Lenti-S virus, but not the host cells with GA prior to the infection, reduced Lenti-S infection, indicating that GA targeted the virus for infection. Surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that GA interacted with a recombinant S protein and blocked S protein binding to host cells. Autodocking analysis revealed that the S protein has several GA-binding pockets including one at the interaction interface to the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and another at the inner side of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) which might impact the close-to-open conformation change of the S protein required for ACE2 interaction. In addition to identifying GA antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2, the study linked GA antiviral activity to its effect on virus cell binding.


Subject(s)
Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Internalization/drug effects
4.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 126, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448237

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At present, the COVID-19 has been prevalent worldwide for more than a year and caused more than four million deaths. Liver injury was frequently observed in patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new definition of metabolic dysfunction associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed by a panel of international experts, and the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 has been actively investigated. Several previous studies indicated that the patients with MAFLD had a higher prevalence of COVID-19 and a tendency to develop severe type of respiratory infection, and others indicated that liver injury would be exacerbated in the patients with MAFLD once infected with COVID-19. The mechanism underlying the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 infection has not been thoroughly investigated, and recent studies indicated that multifactorial mechanisms, such as altered host angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor expression, direct viral attack, disruption of cholangiocyte function, systemic inflammatory reaction, drug-induced liver injury, hepatic ischemic and hypoxic injury, and MAFLD-related glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, might jointly contribute to both of the adverse hepatic and respiratory outcomes. In this review, we discussed the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 based on current available literature, and summarized the recommendations for clinical management of MAFLD patients during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/complications , Hypoxia/complications , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dipeptides/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucose/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1508-1510, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343639

ABSTRACT

The outbreak and pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 in 2019 has caused a severe public health burden and will challenge global health for the future. The discovery and mechanistic investigation of drugs against Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is in deadly demand. The paper published by Li and colleagues proposed the hypothesis that vitamin C combined with glycyrrhizic acid in treating COVID-19 and its mechanistic investigation was performed by a database-based network pharmacology. In this letter, we present critical comments on the limitations and insufficiencies involved, from both the perspective of network pharmacology and current evidence on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Repositioning , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , COVID-19/virology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1161-1174, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343620

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a fatal and fast-spreading viral infection. To date, the number of COVID-19 patients worldwide has crossed over six million with over three hundred and seventy thousand deaths (according to the data from World Health Organization; updated on 2 June 2020). Although COVID-19 can be rapidly diagnosed, efficient clinical treatment of COVID-19 remains unavailable, resulting in high fatality. Some clinical trials have identified vitamin C (VC) as a potent compound pneumonia management. In addition, glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is clinically as an anti-inflammatory medicine against pneumonia-induced inflammatory stress. We hypothesized that the combination of VC and GA is a potential option for treating COVID-19. METHODS: The aim of this study was to determine pharmacological targets and molecular mechanisms of VC + GA treatment for COVID-19, using bioinformational network pharmacology. RESULTS: We uncovered optimal targets, biological processes and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of VC + GA against COVID-19. Our findings suggested that combinatorial VC and GA treatment for COVID-19 was associated with elevation of immunity and suppression of inflammatory stress, including activation of the T cell receptor signaling pathway, regulation of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, ErbB signaling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway. We also identified 17 core targets of VC + GA, which suggest as antimicrobial function. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, our study uncovered the pharmacological mechanism underlying combined VC and GA treatment for COVID-19. These results should benefit efforts to address the most pressing problem currently facing the world.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Computational Biology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans
7.
Am J Chin Med ; 48(7): 1539-1552, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327716

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in 2019 highlighted the fact that no specific medications providing effective treatment have been identified and approved. We explored the possibilities for COVID-19 by systematically reviewing evidence on the efficacy and safety of glycyrrhizin preparations for SARS and MERS. Electronic databases were systematically searched from inception to February 2020 for eligible studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of glycyrrhizin preparations for SARS and MERS. A quantitative analysis or descriptive analysis was applied. Five retrospective cohort studies were included, and NOS scores ranged from 5-7 points. The clinical symptoms of dry cough, chest distress and dyspnoea improved quickly, and elevated serum levels of aminotransferase decreased after compound glycyrrhizin treatment. The SARS-CoV antibody appeared earlier in the treated group than in the control group ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]d). Compared to that with conventional medications, the average period from peak to 50% improvement of lesions, in terms of X-ray manifestations, was shorter with compound glycyrrhizin treatment ([Formula: see text]2.1[Formula: see text]d), and treatment reduced the dosage ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mg/d) and duration of the corticosteroids used, without other serious adverse reactions. Based on the available evidence regarding glycyrrhizin preparations for treating SARS and MERS, we infer that compound glycyrrhizin could be an optional therapeutic strategy for SARS-CoV-2 infections, especially those complicated with liver damage. Further research using well-designed randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is warranted to determine the dosage and duration of use of compound glycyrrhizin and to monitor its specific adverse effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Pandemics , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Treatment Outcome
8.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295894

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a key entry point of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus known to induce Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have recently outlined a concept to reduce ACE2 expression by the administration of glycyrrhizin, a component of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract, via its inhibitory activity on 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2) and resulting activation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We hypothesized that in organs such as the ileum, which co-express 11betaHSD2, MR and ACE2, the expression of ACE2 would be suppressed. We studied organ tissues from an experiment originally designed to address the effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract on stress response. Male Sprague Dawley rats were left undisturbed or exposed to chronic mild stress for five weeks. For the last two weeks, animals continued with a placebo diet or received a diet containing extract of Glycyrrhiza glabra root at a dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight/day. Quantitative PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in gene expression of ACE2 in the small intestine of rats fed with diet containing Glycyrrhiza glabra extract. This effect was independent of the stress condition and failed to be observed in non-target tissues, namely the heart and the brain cortex. In the small intestine we also confirmed the reduction of ACE2 at the protein level. Present findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that Glycyrrhiza glabra extract may reduce an entry point of SARS-CoV-2. Whether this phenomenon, when confirmed in additional studies, is linked to the susceptibility of cells to the virus requires further studies.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Glycyrrhiza , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Male , Plant Extracts/administration & dosage , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
9.
Biomolecules ; 11(6)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264413

ABSTRACT

The phytotherapeutic properties of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) extract are mainly attributed to glycyrrhizin (GR) and glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Among their possible pharmacological actions, the ability to act against viruses belonging to different families, including SARS coronavirus, is particularly important. With the COVID-19 emergency and the urgent need for compounds to counteract the pandemic, the antiviral properties of GR and GA, as pure substances or as components of licorice extract, attracted attention in the last year and supported the launch of two clinical trials. In silico docking studies reported that GR and GA may directly interact with the key players in viral internalization and replication such as angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), spike protein, the host transmembrane serine protease 2, and 3-chymotrypsin-like cysteine protease. In vitro data indicated that GR can interfere with virus entry by directly interacting with ACE2 and spike, with a nonspecific effect on cell and viral membranes. Additional anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of GR cannot be excluded. These multiple activities of GR and licorice extract are critically re-assessed in this review, and their possible role against the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 and the features of COVID-19 disease is discussed.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glycyrrhetinic Acid/pharmacology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , Glycyrrhetinic Acid/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhiza/chemistry , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
10.
J Sep Sci ; 44(16): 3146-3157, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260558

ABSTRACT

Divya-Swasari-Vati is a calcium containing polyherbal ayurvedic medicine prescribed for the lung-related ailments observed in the current pandemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 infections. The formulation is a unique quintessential blend of nine herbs cited in Ayurvedic texts for chronic cough and lung infection. Analytical standardization of herbal medicines is the pressing need of the hour to ascertain the quality compliance. This persuaded us to develop a simple, rapid, and selective high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for Divya-Swasari-Vati quality standardization. The developed method was validated for the quantification of marker components, gallic acid, cinnamic acid, piperine, eugenol and glycyrrhizin, against reference standards in five different batches of Divya-Swasari-Vati. The analytes were identified by visualization at 254 nm, and by matching their retention factor with authentic standards. The developed method was validated as per the guidelines recommended by the International Council for Harmonization for parameters like, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, and precision. Therefore, the developed novel high-performance thin-layer chromatographic process could be employed for rapid standardization of Divya-Swasari-Vati and other related herbal formulation, which would aid in quality manufacturing and product development.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/analysis , Benzodioxoles/analysis , Cinnamates/analysis , Eugenol/analysis , Gallic Acid/analysis , Glycyrrhizic Acid/analysis , Piperidines/analysis , Plant Extracts/analysis , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/analysis , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Benzodioxoles/therapeutic use , Chromatography, Thin Layer , Cinnamates/therapeutic use , Eugenol/therapeutic use , Gallic Acid/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , Medicine, Ayurvedic , Molecular Structure , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Polyunsaturated Alkamides/therapeutic use
11.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(18): 20995-21006, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209173

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been diffusely pandemic around the world, characterized by massive morbidity and mortality. One of the remarkable threats associated with mortality may be the uncontrolled inflammatory processes, which were induced by SARS-CoV-2 in infected patients. As there are no specific drugs, exploiting safe and effective treatment strategies is an instant requirement to dwindle viral damage and relieve extreme inflammation simultaneously. Here, highly biocompatible glycyrrhizic acid (GA) nanoparticles (GANPs) were synthesized based on GA. In vitro investigations revealed that GANPs inhibit the proliferation of the murine coronavirus MHV-A59 and reduce proinflammatory cytokine production caused by MHV-A59 or the N protein of SARS-CoV-2. In an MHV-A59-induced surrogate mouse model of COVID-19, GANPs specifically target areas with severe inflammation, such as the lungs, which appeared to improve the accumulation of GANPs and enhance the effectiveness of the treatment. Further, GANPs also exert antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects, relieving organ damage and conferring a significant survival advantage to infected mice. Such a novel therapeutic agent can be readily manufactured into feasible treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , Humans , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/pharmacology , RAW 264.7 Cells , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , THP-1 Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Diseases/pathology , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(6)2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125145

ABSTRACT

In order to treat Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), we predicted and implemented a drug delivery system (DDS) that can provide stable drug delivery through a computational approach including a clustering algorithm and the Schrödinger software. Six carrier candidates were derived by the proposed method that could find molecules meeting the predefined conditions using the molecular structure and its functional group positional information. Then, just one compound named glycyrrhizin was selected as a candidate for drug delivery through the Schrödinger software. Using glycyrrhizin, nafamostat mesilate (NM), which is known for its efficacy, was converted into micelle nanoparticles (NPs) to improve drug stability and to effectively treat COVID-19. The spherical particle morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the particle size and stability of 300-400 nm were evaluated by measuring DLSand the zeta potential. The loading of NM was confirmed to be more than 90% efficient using the UV spectrum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , A549 Cells , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Benzamidines/chemistry , Benzamidines/therapeutic use , Cell Survival/drug effects , Cluster Analysis , Computer Simulation , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Drug Repositioning , Drug Stability , Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Guanidines/chemistry , Guanidines/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Micelles , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Molecular Structure , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Particle Size
13.
Phytother Res ; 35(2): 629-636, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1098919

ABSTRACT

Currently, over 100 countries are fighting against a common enemy, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, which causes COVID-19. This has created a demand for a substance whose effectiveness has already been demonstrated in a similar scenario. Glycyrrhizin (GZ) is a promising agent against SARS-CoV-2 as its antiviral activity against SARS-CoV has already been confirmed. It is worthwhile to extrapolate from its proven therapeutic effects as there is a high similarity in the structure and genome of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. There are many possible mechanisms through which GZ acts against viruses: increasing nitrous oxide production in macrophages, affecting transcription factors and cellular signalling pathways, directly altering the viral lipid-bilayer membrane, and binding to the ACE2 receptor. In this review, we discuss the possible use of GZ in the COVID-19 setting, where topical administration appears to be promising, with the nasal and oral cavity notably being the potent location in terms of viral load. The most recently published papers on the distribution of ACE2 in the human body and documented binding of GZ to this receptor, as well as its antiviral activity, suggest that GZ can be used as a therapeutic for COVID-19 and as a preventive agent against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemoprevention/methods , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Administration, Intranasal , Administration, Topical , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Therapies, Investigational/methods
14.
Mini Rev Med Chem ; 21(16): 2204-2208, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079425

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an emerging viral infection of zoonotic origin that is closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that caused an outbreak in 2003. Therefore, scientists named the new virus SARS-CoV-2. On March 11, 2020, The World Health Organization (WHO) recognized COVID-19 as a global pandemic. At present, three vaccines have been approved or are being considered for approval by national regulatory agencies to immunize against COVID- 19. However, the vaccines do not remain widely available, and no specific treatment against the virus is available. The pathogenesis and proliferation pathways of SARS-CoV-2 are still not well known. Thus, in this article, the saponin glycyrrhizin is discussed as a new potential therapeutic agent of natural origin (licorice root, Glycyrrhiza glabra) for the potential treatment of COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
15.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1161-1174, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646610

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a fatal and fast-spreading viral infection. To date, the number of COVID-19 patients worldwide has crossed over six million with over three hundred and seventy thousand deaths (according to the data from World Health Organization; updated on 2 June 2020). Although COVID-19 can be rapidly diagnosed, efficient clinical treatment of COVID-19 remains unavailable, resulting in high fatality. Some clinical trials have identified vitamin C (VC) as a potent compound pneumonia management. In addition, glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is clinically as an anti-inflammatory medicine against pneumonia-induced inflammatory stress. We hypothesized that the combination of VC and GA is a potential option for treating COVID-19. METHODS: The aim of this study was to determine pharmacological targets and molecular mechanisms of VC + GA treatment for COVID-19, using bioinformational network pharmacology. RESULTS: We uncovered optimal targets, biological processes and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of VC + GA against COVID-19. Our findings suggested that combinatorial VC and GA treatment for COVID-19 was associated with elevation of immunity and suppression of inflammatory stress, including activation of the T cell receptor signaling pathway, regulation of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, ErbB signaling pathway and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway. We also identified 17 core targets of VC + GA, which suggest as antimicrobial function. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, our study uncovered the pharmacological mechanism underlying combined VC and GA treatment for COVID-19. These results should benefit efforts to address the most pressing problem currently facing the world.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Computational Biology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans
16.
Pharmacol Ther ; 214: 107618, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613022

ABSTRACT

Safe and efficient drugs to combat the current COVID-19 pandemic are urgently needed. In this context, we have analyzed the anti-coronavirus potential of the natural product glycyrrhizic acid (GLR), a drug used to treat liver diseases (including viral hepatitis) and specific cutaneous inflammation (such as atopic dermatitis) in some countries. The properties of GLR and its primary active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid are presented and discussed. GLR has shown activities against different viruses, including SARS-associated Human and animal coronaviruses. GLR is a non-hemolytic saponin and a potent immuno-active anti-inflammatory agent which displays both cytoplasmic and membrane effects. At the membrane level, GLR induces cholesterol-dependent disorganization of lipid rafts which are important for the entry of coronavirus into cells. At the intracellular and circulating levels, GLR can trap the high mobility group box 1 protein and thus blocks the alarmin functions of HMGB1. We used molecular docking to characterize further and discuss both the cholesterol- and HMG box-binding functions of GLR. The membrane and cytoplasmic effects of GLR, coupled with its long-established medical use as a relatively safe drug, make GLR a good candidate to be tested against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, alone and in combination with other drugs. The rational supporting combinations with (hydroxy)chloroquine and tenofovir (two drugs active against SARS-CoV-2) is also discussed. Based on this analysis, we conclude that GLR should be further considered and rapidly evaluated for the treatment of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Alarmins/drug effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Membrane Microdomains/drug effects , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tenofovir/therapeutic use
17.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1239, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612742

ABSTRACT

The role of the ACE2 enzyme in the COVID-19 infection is 2-fold, with opposing implications for the disease development. 1. The membrane bound angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) serves as the entry point of COVID-19 2. Conversely, it supports an anti-inflammatory pathway. This led to the controversy of the impact of medications, which influence its expression. ACE2 is part of the wider renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and is upregulated via compounds, which inhibits the classical ACE, thereby plasma aldosterone and aldosterone receptor (MR) activation. MR activation may therefore protect organs from binding the COVID-19 by reducing ACE2 expression. Glycyrrhizin (GL) is a frequent component in traditional Chinese medicines, which have been used to control COVID-19 infections. Its systemically active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) inhibits 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase(11betaHSD2) and activates MR in organs, which express this enzyme, including the lungs. Does this affect the protective effect of ACE2? Importantly, GL has anti-inflammatory properties by itself via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonism and therefore compensates for the reduced protection of the downregulated ACE2. Finally, a direct effect of GL or GA to reduce virus transmission exists, which may involve reduced expression of type 2 transmembrane serine protease (TMPRSS2), which is required for virus uptake. Glycyrrhizin may reduce the severity of an infection with COVID-19 at the two stages of the COVID-19 induced disease process, 1. To block the number of entry points and 2. provide an ACE2 independent anti-inflammatory mechanism.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , Glycyrrhiza , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus , Receptors, Virus/metabolism
18.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 55(6): 105995, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-164767

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the previously unknown pathogen, severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is now a global pandemic. There are no vaccines or specific treatments against this new virus; therefore, there is an urgent need to advance novel therapeutic interventions for COVID-19. Glycyrrhizin is a triterpene saponin with various biological functions and pharmacological effects. This brief article discusses the therapeutic potential of glycyrrhizin for the treatment of COVID-19 from the perspective of its pharmacological action, including binding angiotensin-converting enzyme II (ACE2), downregulating proinflammatory cytokines, inhibiting the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting thrombin, inhibiting the hyperproduction of airway exudates, and inducing endogenous interferon.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Interferons/biosynthesis , Interferons/immunology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Attachment/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects
19.
Nutrients ; 12(4)2020 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116799

ABSTRACT

Novel coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged periodically around the world in recent years. The recurrent spreading of CoVs imposes an ongoing threat to global health and the economy. Since no specific therapy for these CoVs is available, any beneficial approach (including nutritional and dietary approach) is worth investigation. Based on recent advances in nutrients and phytonutrients research, a novel combination of vitamin C, curcumin and glycyrrhizic acid (VCG Plus) was developed that has potential against CoV infection. System biology tools were applied to explore the potential of VCG Plus in modulating targets and pathways relevant to immune and inflammation responses. Gene target acquisition, gene ontology and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment were conducted consecutively along with network analysis. The results show that VCG Plus can act on 88 hub targets which are closely connected and associated with immune and inflammatory responses. Specifically, VCG Plus has the potential to regulate innate immune response by acting on NOD-like and Toll-like signaling pathways to promote interferons production, activate and balance T-cells, and regulate the inflammatory response by inhibiting PI3K/AKT, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. All these biological processes and pathways have been well documented in CoV infections studies. Therefore, our findings suggest that VCG Plus may be helpful in regulating immune response to combat CoV infections and inhibit excessive inflammatory responses to prevent the onset of cytokine storm. However, further in vitro and in vivo experiments are warranted to validate the current findings with system biology tools. Our current approach provides a new strategy in predicting formulation rationale when developing new dietary supplements.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Curcuma/chemistry , Curcumin/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Drug Combinations , Drug Delivery Systems , Gene Ontology , Glycyrrhiza/chemistry , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Humans , Interferons/metabolism , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction , Systems Biology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Vitamins/pharmacology , Vitamins/therapeutic use
20.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 39(7): 1209-1220, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-109007

ABSTRACT

To analyze the susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy and the drugs that can be used to treat pregnancy with COVID-19, so as to provide evidence for drug selection in clinic. By reviewing the existing literature, this paper analyzes the susceptibility of pregnant women to virus, especially to SARS-CoV-2, from the aspects of anatomical, reproductive endocrine and immune changes during pregnancy and screens effective and fetal-safe treatments from the existing drugs. The anatomical structure of the respiratory system is changed during pregnancy, and the virus transmitted by droplets and aerosols is more easily inhaled by pregnant women and is difficult to remove. Furthermore, the prognosis is worse after infection when compared with non-pregnancy women. And changes in reproductive hormones and immune systems during pregnancy collectively make them more susceptible to certain infections. More importantly, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2, the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, has been proven highly increased during pregnancy, which may contribute to the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. When it comes to treatment, specific drugs for COVID-19 have not been found at present, and taking old drugs for new use in treating COVID-19 has become an emergency method for the pandemic. Particularly, drugs that show superior maternal and fetal safety are worthy of consideration for pregnant women with COVID-19, such as chloroquine, metformin, statins, lobinavir/ritonavir, glycyrrhizic acid, and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery (NMDD), etc. Pregnant women are susceptible to COVID-19, and special attention should be paid to the selection of drugs that are both effective for maternal diseases and friendly to the fetus. However, there are still many deficiencies in the study of drug safety during pregnancy, and broad-spectrum, effective and fetal-safe drugs for pregnant women need to be developed so as to cope with more infectious diseases in the future.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/metabolism , Pregnancy/physiology , Respiratory Physiological Phenomena , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Basal Metabolism , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Congenital Abnormalities/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Disease Susceptibility/metabolism , Drug Combinations , Drug Delivery Systems , Female , Functional Residual Capacity , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Interferon Type I/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Metformin/therapeutic use , Nanoparticles , Oxygen Consumption , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pregnancy/immunology , Pregnancy/metabolism , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Progesterone/metabolism , Prognosis , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL