Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Transplant Cell Ther ; 28(10): 677.e1-677.e6, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914740

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, donor grafts are frequently cryopreserved to ensure that a graft is available before starting a conditioning regimen. However, there have been conflicting reports on the effect of cryopreservation on transplantation outcomes. Also, the impact of cryopreservation may differ in bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation (PBSCT). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of both cryopreserved unrelated BMTs (n = 235) and PBSCTs (n = 118) and compared these with data from a large control cohort without cryopreservation including 4133 BMTs and 720 PBSCTs. Among the patients with cryopreserved grafts, 10 BMT recipients (4.3%) and 3 PBSCT recipients (2.5%) did not achieve neutrophil engraftment after transplantation, including 4 of the former and all 3 of the latter who died early before engraftment. In a multivariate analysis, cryopreservation was not associated with neutrophil engraftment in BMT but significantly delayed neutrophil engraftment in PBSCT (hazard ratio [HR], .82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .69 to .97; P = .023). There was an interaction with borderline significance between cryopreservation and the stem cell source (P = .067). Platelet engraftment was delayed by cryopreservation after both BMT and PBSCT. Only 2 cryopreserved grafts (<1%) were unused during the study period. The cryopreservation of unrelated donor BM and PBSC grafts is associated with a slight delay in neutrophil and platelet engraftment but an acceptable rate of graft failure. PBSC grafts may be more sensitive to cryopreservation than BM grafts. Cryopreservation is a reasonable option during COVID-19 pandemic, provided that the apheresis and transplantation centers are adept at cryopreservation. © 2022 American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Graft vs Host Disease , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation , Bone Marrow , COVID-19/epidemiology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States
2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 839844, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775672

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess profound immunomodulatory and regenerative properties that are of clinical use in numerous clinical indications with unmet medical need. Common sources of MSCs include among others, bone marrow (BM), fat, umbilical cord, and placenta-derived decidua stromal cells (DSCs). We here summarize our more than 20-years of scientific experience in the clinical use of MSCs and DSCs in different clinical settings. BM-MSCs were first explored to enhance the engraftment of autografts in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and osteogenesis imperfecta around 30 years ago. In 2004, our group reported the first anti-inflammatory use of BM-MSCs in a child with grade IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Subsequent studies have shown that MSCs appear to be more effective in acute than chronic GvHD. Today BM-MSC-therapy is registered for acute GvHD in Japan and for GvHD in children in Canada and New Zeeland. MSCs first home to the lung following intravenous injection and exert strong local and systemic immunomodulatory effects on the host immune system. Thus, they were studied for ameliorating the cytokine storm in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Both, MSCs and DSCs were used to treat SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus-induced disease 2019 (COVID-19)-induced ARDS. In addition, they were also used for other novel indications, such as pneumomediastinum, colon perforation, and radiculomyelopathy. MSC and DSCs trigger coagulation and were thus explored to stop hemorrhages. DSCs appear to be more effective for acute GvHD, ARDS, and hemorrhages, but randomized studies are needed to prove superiority. Stromal cell infusion is safe, well tolerated, and only gives rise to a slight fever in a limited number of patients, but no major side effects have been reported in multiple safety studies and metaanalysis. In this review we summarize current evidence from in vitro studies, animal models, and importantly our clinical experience, to support stromal cell therapy in multiple clinical indications. This encloses MSC's effects on the immune system, coagulation, and their safety and efficacy, which are discussed in relation to prominent clinical trials within the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Graft vs Host Disease , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 367, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475287

ABSTRACT

Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) embodies a mixture of clinical manifestations, including elevated circulating cytokine levels, acute systemic inflammatory symptoms and secondary organ dysfunction, which was first described in the context of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and was later observed in pandemics of influenza, SARS-CoV and COVID-19, immunotherapy of tumor, after chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) therapy, and in monogenic disorders and autoimmune diseases. Particularly, severe CRS is a very significant and life-threatening complication, which is clinically characterized by persistent high fever, hyperinflammation, and severe organ dysfunction. However, CRS is a double-edged sword, which may be both helpful in controlling tumors/viruses/infections and harmful to the host. Although a high incidence and high levels of cytokines are features of CRS, the detailed kinetics and specific mechanisms of CRS in human diseases and intervention therapy remain unclear. In the present review, we have summarized the most recent advances related to the clinical features and management of CRS as well as cutting-edge technologies to elucidate the mechanisms of CRS. Considering that CRS is the major adverse event in human diseases and intervention therapy, our review delineates the characteristics, kinetics, signaling pathways, and potential mechanisms of CRS, which shows its clinical relevance for achieving both favorable efficacy and low toxicity.


Subject(s)
Cytokine Release Syndrome , Signal Transduction/immunology , Acute Disease , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Graft vs Host Disease/complications , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/adverse effects , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/immunology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy
4.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 10(9): 1288-1303, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233233

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy (MSCT) for immune and inflammatory diseases continues to be popular based on progressive accumulation of preclinical mechanistic evidence. This has led to further expansion in clinical indications from graft rejection, autoimmune diseases, and osteoarthritis, to inflammatory liver and pulmonary diseases including COVID-19. A clear trend is the shift from using autologous to allogeneic MSCs, which can be immediately available as off-the-shelf products. In addition, new products such as cell-free exosomes and human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived MSCs are exciting developments to further prevalent use. Increasing numbers of trials have now published results in which safety of MSCT has been largely demonstrated. While reports of therapeutic endpoints are still emerging, efficacy can be seen for specific indications-including graft-vs-host-disease, strongly Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases, and osteoarthritis-which are more robustly supported by mechanistic preclinical evidence. In this review, we update and discuss outcomes in current MSCT clinical trials for immune and inflammatory disease, as well as new innovation and emerging trends in the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/classification
5.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 451, 2020 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Italian hospitals faced the most daunting challenges of their recent history, and only essential therapeutic interventions were feasible. From March to April 2020, the Laboratory of Advanced Cellular Therapies (Vicenza, Italy) received requests to treat a patient with severe COVID-19 and a patient with acute graft-versus-host disease with umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs). Access to clinics was restricted due to the risk of contagion. Transport of UC-MSCs in liquid nitrogen was unmanageable, leaving shipment in dry ice as the only option. METHODS: We assessed effects of the transition from liquid nitrogen to dry ice on cell viability; apoptosis; phenotype; proliferation; immunomodulation; and clonogenesis; and validated dry ice-based transport of UC-MSCs to clinics. RESULTS: Our results showed no differences in cell functionality related to the two storage conditions, and demonstrated the preservation of immunomodulatory and clonogenic potentials in dry ice. UC-MSCs were successfully delivered to points-of-care, enabling favourable clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This experience underscores the flexibility of a public cell factory in its adaptation of the logistics of an advanced therapy medicinal product during a public health crisis. Alternative supply chains should be evaluated for other cell products to guarantee delivery during catastrophes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Dry Ice , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration , Transportation , Acute Disease , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Cell Survival , Cells, Cultured , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Equipment and Supplies, Hospital/standards , Equipment and Supplies, Hospital/supply & distribution , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Materials Management, Hospital/organization & administration , Materials Management, Hospital/standards , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/standards , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Organization and Administration/standards , Pandemics , Phenotype , Point-of-Care Systems/standards , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Transportation/methods , Transportation/standards
6.
Sci Adv ; 6(30): eaba6884, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706017

ABSTRACT

More than 1050 clinical trials are registered at FDA.gov that explore multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for nearly every clinical application imaginable, including neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, perianal fistulas, graft-versus-host disease, COVID-19, and cancer. Several companies have or are in the process of commercializing MSC-based therapies. However, most of the clinical-stage MSC therapies have been unable to meet primary efficacy end points. The innate therapeutic functions of MSCs administered to humans are not as robust as demonstrated in preclinical studies, and in general, the translation of cell-based therapy is impaired by a myriad of steps that introduce heterogeneity. In this review, we discuss the major clinical challenges with MSC therapies, the details of these challenges, and the potential bioengineering approaches that leverage the unique biology of MSCs to overcome the challenges and achieve more potent and versatile therapies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Batch Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Bioreactors , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Graft vs Host Disease/therapy , Humans , Metabolic Engineering/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL