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1.
Zhongguo Shi Yan Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi ; 30(2): 645-648, 2022 Apr.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786420

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly worldwide since outbreak in December 2019, and become a global public health crisis. Patients with hematological malignancy concurrently infected with COVID-19 are often associated with severe even fatal complications, due to low basic immune function, high intensity of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and slow immune reconstruction post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and their treatment strategies, such as anti-infective therapy, blood transfusion, and the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor need to be adjusted. The characteristics of patients, chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and other clinical factors may affect the prognosis of patients with hematological malignancy concurrently infected with COVID-19. Herein, the latest research progress is reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Prognosis
2.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 47: 102305, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730129

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In pandemic conditions, patients with febrile neutropenia are also at risk of COVID-19. Aim of this systematic review is to evaluate COVID-19 cases presented with febrile neutropenia and provide information regarding incidence, clinical course and prognosis. METHODS: We systematically searched on COVID-19 and febrile neutropenia cases in PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science. RESULTS: A total of 19 febrile neutropenic patients were analyzed. A male predominance was noted. Eleven cases had hematological malignancies. Fourteen of the cases were previously received chemotherapy. Five patients had severe neutropenia: 3 had hematologic cancer and none died. 17 (89.5%) cases have pulmonary involvement and seven of them had severe disease with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Three cases with ARDS were died. 12 of them received G-CSF for treatment. Five cases were developed respiratory failure after G-CSF use. Overall mortality was 15.8%, while death was not observed in patients without malignancy and solid organ tumors, the mortality rate was 27% in cases with hematological malignancies. CONCLUSION: In ongoing pandemic, febrile neutropenic patients should be precisely evaluated for COVID-19 disease. It should be remembered that there may not be typical signs and symptoms and laboratory findings of COVID-19 disease because of the immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Febrile Neutropenia , Hematologic Neoplasms , Neoplasms , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Febrile Neutropenia/drug therapy , Female , Fever/etiology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(4): 567-574, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neutropenia is commonly encountered in cancer patients. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, filgrastim), a cytokine that initiates proliferation and differentiation of mature granulocytes, is widely given to oncology patients to counteract neutropenia, reducing susceptibility to infection. However, the clinical impact of neutropenia and G-CSF use in cancer patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unknown. METHODS: An observational cohort of 379 actively treated cancer patients with COVID-19 was assembled to investigate links between concurrent neutropenia and G-CSF administration on COVID-19-associated respiratory failure and death. These factors were encoded as time-dependent predictors in an extended Cox model, controlling for age and underlying cancer diagnosis. To determine whether the degree of granulocyte response to G-CSF affected outcomes, the degree of response to G-CSF, based on rise in absolute neutrophil count (ANC) 24 hours after growth factor administration, was also incorporated into a similar Cox model. RESULTS: In the setting of active COVID-19 infection, outpatient receipt of G-CSF led to an increased number of hospitalizations (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-10.0, P value: .017). Furthermore, among inpatients, G-CSF administration was associated with increased need for high levels of oxygen supplementation and death (HR: 3.56, 95% CI: 1.19-10.2, P value: .024). This effect was predominantly seen in patients that exhibited a high response to G-CSF based on their ANC increase post-G-CSF administration (HR: 7.78, 95% CI: 2.05-27.9, P value: .004). CONCLUSIONS: The potential risks versus benefits of G-CSF administration should be considered in neutropenic cancer patients with COVID-19, because G-CSF administration may lead to worsening clinical and respiratory status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Neutropenia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Filgrastim/therapeutic use , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neutropenia/complications , Neutropenia/drug therapy , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Intern Med ; 61(8): 1219-1223, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677612

ABSTRACT

A 44-year-old man developed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia during immunochemotherapy consisting of carboplatin, paclitaxel, and pembrolizumab for non-small cell lung cancer. Low-grade fever, followed by mild hypoxemia, and febrile neutropenia, were observed, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was administered until the recovery of neutropenia, when he developed a high fever, severe hypoxemia, and hypotension accompanied by consolidation in the bilateral lungs. His conditions promptly improved after treatment including hydrocortisone and the primary and metastatic tumors remained regressed for 10 months without further treatment. Post-COVID-19 organizing pneumonia during cancer immunochemotherapy can be aggravated by immune-checkpoint inhibitors and G-CSF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Adult , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Male
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(1)2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627521

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to prevent febrile neutropenia post chemotherapy. Usually well tolerated with minimal side effects but aortitis is an extremely rare side effect previously reported. A 64-year-old woman treated with adjuvant chemotherapy including G-CSF for left breast cancer was admitted with fevers, neutropenia and markedly raised inflammatory markers after 7 days of her first cycle. Initially diagnosed with neutropenic sepsis, she did not respond to broad spectrum antibiotics with subsequent CT imaging revealing marked periaortic inflammatory changes consistent with aortitis and periaortitis. Extensive investigations for other causes of large vessel vasculitis were negative and G-CSF was the only causative factor. She rapidly responded to steroids with almost complete resolution of inflammatory changes on repeat imaging within 4 weeks and no recurrence on tapering of steroids. This diagnosis must be considered in patients presenting with fever and raised inflammatory markers post G-CSF treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortitis , Breast Neoplasms , Neutropenia , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Aortitis/chemically induced , Aortitis/diagnostic imaging , Aortitis/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Middle Aged , Neutropenia/drug therapy
7.
Bioessays ; 43(2): e2000232, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372696

ABSTRACT

Immunity against SARS-CoV-2 that is acquired by convalescent COVID-19 patients is examined in reference to (A) the Th17 cell generation system in psoriatic epidermis and (B) a recently discovered phenomenon in which Th17 cells are converted into tissue-resident memory T (TRM ) cells with Th1 phenotype. Neutrophils that are attracted to the site of infection secrete IL-17A, which stimulates lung epithelial cells to express CCL20. Natural Th17 (nTh17) cells are recruited to the infection site by CCL20 and expand in the presence of IL-23. These nTh17 cells are converted to TRM cells upon encounter with SARS-CoV-2 and continue to exist as ex-Th17 cells, which exert Th1-like immunity during a memory response. G-CSF can induce nTh17 cell accumulation at the infection site because it promotes neutrophil egress from the bone marrow. Hence, G-CSF may be effective against COVID-19. Administration of G-CSF to patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 is worth a clinical trial.


Subject(s)
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokine CCL20/metabolism , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-23 Subunit p19/immunology , Neutrophils/drug effects , Th17 Cells/drug effects
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(4): 567-574, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neutropenia is commonly encountered in cancer patients. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, filgrastim), a cytokine that initiates proliferation and differentiation of mature granulocytes, is widely given to oncology patients to counteract neutropenia, reducing susceptibility to infection. However, the clinical impact of neutropenia and G-CSF use in cancer patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unknown. METHODS: An observational cohort of 379 actively treated cancer patients with COVID-19 was assembled to investigate links between concurrent neutropenia and G-CSF administration on COVID-19-associated respiratory failure and death. These factors were encoded as time-dependent predictors in an extended Cox model, controlling for age and underlying cancer diagnosis. To determine whether the degree of granulocyte response to G-CSF affected outcomes, the degree of response to G-CSF, based on rise in absolute neutrophil count (ANC) 24 hours after growth factor administration, was also incorporated into a similar Cox model. RESULTS: In the setting of active COVID-19 infection, outpatient receipt of G-CSF led to an increased number of hospitalizations (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-10.0, P value: .017). Furthermore, among inpatients, G-CSF administration was associated with increased need for high levels of oxygen supplementation and death (HR: 3.56, 95% CI: 1.19-10.2, P value: .024). This effect was predominantly seen in patients that exhibited a high response to G-CSF based on their ANC increase post-G-CSF administration (HR: 7.78, 95% CI: 2.05-27.9, P value: .004). CONCLUSIONS: The potential risks versus benefits of G-CSF administration should be considered in neutropenic cancer patients with COVID-19, because G-CSF administration may lead to worsening clinical and respiratory status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Neutropenia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Filgrastim/therapeutic use , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neutropenia/complications , Neutropenia/drug therapy , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(2): 1129-1138, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940992

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are at higher risk of more severe COVID-19 infection and have more associated complications. The position paper describes the management of cancer patients, especially those receiving anticancer treatment, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dyspnea is a common emergency presentation in patients with cancer with a wide range of differential diagnoses, including pulmonary embolism, pleural disease, lymphangitis, and infection, of which SARS-CoV-2 is now a pathogen to be considered. Screening interviews to determine whether patients may be infected with COVID-19 are imperative to prevent the spread of infection, especially within healthcare facilities. Cancer patients testing positive with no or minimal symptoms may be monitored from home. Telemedicine is an option to aid in following patients without potential exposure. Management of complications of systemic anticancer treatment, such as febrile neutropenia (FN), is of particular importance during the COVID-19 pandemic where clinicians aim to minimize patients' risk of infection and need for hospital visits. Outpatient management of patients with low-risk FN is a safe and effective strategy. Although the MASCC score has not been validated in patients with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2, it has nevertheless performed well in patients with a range of infective illnesses and, accordingly, it is reasonable to expect efficacy in the clinical setting of COVID-19. Risk stratification of patients presenting with FN is a vital tenet of the evolving sepsis and pandemic strategy, necessitating access to locally formulated services based on MASCC and other national and international guidelines. Innovative oncology services will need to utilize telemedicine, hospital at home, and ambulatory care services approaches not only to limit the number of hospital visits but also to anticipate the complications of the anticancer treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Febrile Neutropenia/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Neoplasms/complications , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/complications , Febrile Neutropenia/etiology , Febrile Neutropenia/therapy , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine
11.
Ann Oncol ; 31(10): 1320-1335, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-804478

ABSTRACT

We established an international consortium to review and discuss relevant clinical evidence in order to develop expert consensus statements related to cancer management during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The steering committee prepared 10 working packages addressing significant clinical questions from diagnosis to surgery. During a virtual consensus meeting of 62 global experts and one patient advocate, led by the European Society for Medical Oncology, statements were discussed, amended and voted upon. When consensus could not be reached, the panel revised statements until a consensus was reached. Overall, the expert panel agreed on 28 consensus statements that can be used to overcome many of the clinical and technical areas of uncertainty ranging from diagnosis to therapeutic planning and treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medical Oncology/standards , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Societies, Medical/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Management , Europe/epidemiology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards
12.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 8(10): 3247-3250, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779133

ABSTRACT

NASA implements required medical tests and clinical monitoring to ensure the health and safety of its astronauts. These measures include a pre-launch quarantine to mitigate the risk of infectious diseases. During space missions, most astronauts experience perturbations to their immune system that manifest as a detectable secondary immunodeficiency. On return to Earth, after the stress of re-entry and landing, astronauts would be most vulnerable to infectious disease. In April 2020, a crew returned from International Space Station to NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Post-flight quarantine protocols (both crew and contacts) were enhanced to protect this crew from SARS-CoV-2. In addition, specific additional clinical monitoring was performed to determine post-flight immunocompetence. Given that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prognosis is more severe for the immunocompromised, a countermeasures protocol for spaceflight suggested by an international team of scientists could benefit terrestrial patients with secondary immunodeficiency.


Subject(s)
Astronauts , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/methods , Space Flight , Stress, Physiological/immunology , Betacoronavirus , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dietary Supplements , Exercise Therapy , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/therapeutic use , Interleukin-2/therapeutic use , Organizational Policy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Quarantine/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Spacecraft , Texas , United States , United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration
13.
JAMA Intern Med ; 181(1): 71-78, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-775497

ABSTRACT

Importance: Lymphopenia is common and correlates with poor clinical outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objective: To determine whether a therapy that increases peripheral blood leukocyte and lymphocyte cell counts leads to clinical improvement in patients with COVID-19. Design, Setting and Participants: Between February 18 and April 10, 2020, we conducted an open-label, multicenter, randomized clinical trial at 3 participating centers in China. The main eligibility criteria were pneumonia, a blood lymphocyte cell count of 800 per µL (to convert to ×109/L, multiply by 0.001) or lower, and no comorbidities. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction testing. Exposures: Usual care alone, or usual care plus 3 doses of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, 5 µg/kg, subcutaneously at days 0-2). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was the time from randomization to improvement of at least 1 point on a 7-category disease severity score. Results: Of 200 participants, 112 (56%) were men and the median (interquartile range [IQR]) age was 45 (40-55) years. There was random assignment of 100 patients (50%) to the rhG-CSF group and 100 (50%) to the usual care group. Time to clinical improvement was similar between groups (rhG-CSF group median of 12 days (IQR, 10-16 days) vs usual care group median of 13 days (IQR, 11-17 days); hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71; P = .06). For secondary end points, the proportion of patients progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, or septic shock was lower in the rhG-CSF group (rhG-CSF group, 2% vs usual care group, 15%; difference, -13%; 95%CI, -21.4% to -5.4%). At 21 days, 2 patients (2%) had died in the rhG-CSF group compared with 10 patients (10%) in the usual care group (hazard ratio, 0.19; 95%CI, 0.04-0.88). At day 5, the lymphocyte cell count was higher in the rhG-CSF group (rhG-CSF group median of 1050/µL vs usual care group median of 620/µL; Hodges-Lehmann estimate of the difference in medians, 440; 95% CI, 380-490). Serious adverse events, such as sepsis or septic shock, respiratory failure, and acute respiratory distress syndrome, occurred in 29 patients (14.5%) in the rhG-CSF group and 42 patients (21%) in the usual care group. Conclusion and Relevance: In preliminary findings from a randomized clinical trial, rhG-CSF treatment for patients with COVID-19 with lymphopenia but no comorbidities did not accelerate clinical improvement, but the number of patients developing critical illness or dying may have been reduced. Larger studies that include a broader range of patients with COVID-19 should be conducted. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR2000030007.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Hematologic Agents/therapeutic use , Hospital Mortality , Lymphopenia/drug therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , B-Lymphocytes , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , China , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Noninvasive Ventilation , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Recombinant Proteins , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/physiopathology , Shock, Septic/physiopathology , Time Factors
15.
Br J Haematol ; 191(3): 386-389, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697165

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically challenged care for cancer patients, especially those with active treatment who represent a vulnerable population for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Aggressive lymphoid neoplasms, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma and high-grade B cell lymphoma, need to be treated without delay in order to get the best disease outcome. Because of that, our clinical practice was changed to minimise the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection while continuing haematological treatment. In this report, we analyse the management of front-line therapy in 18 patients during the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as the results of the implemented measures in their outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/drug therapy , Pandemics , Plasmablastic Lymphoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Cyclophosphamide/administration & dosage , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Doxorubicin/administration & dosage , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Febrile Neutropenia/chemically induced , Febrile Neutropenia/prevention & control , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Prednisone/adverse effects , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Spain/epidemiology , Superinfection/drug therapy , Vincristine/administration & dosage , Vincristine/adverse effects
16.
Oncologist ; 25(10): e1509-e1515, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has become a public health emergency affecting frail populations, including patients with cancer. This poses the question of whether cancer treatments can be postponed or modified without compromising their efficacy, especially for highly curable cancers such as germ cell tumors (GCTs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: To depict the state-of-the-art management of GCTs during the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey including 26 questions was circulated by e-mail among the physicians belonging to three cooperative groups: (a) Italian Germ Cell Cancer Group; (b) European Reference Network-Rare Adult Solid Cancers, Domain G3 (rare male genitourinary cancers); and (c) Genitourinary Medical Oncologists of Canada. Percentages of agreement between Italian respondents (I) versus Canadian respondents (C), I versus European respondents (E), and E versus C were compared by using Fisher's exact tests for dichotomous answers and chi square test for trends for the questions with three or more options. RESULTS: Fifty-three GCT experts responded to the survey: 20 Italian, 6 in other European countries, and 27 from Canada. Telemedicine was broadly used; there was high consensus to interrupt chemotherapy in COVID-19-positive patients (I = 75%, C = 55%, and E = 83.3%) and for use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor primary prophylaxis for neutropenia (I = 65%, C = 62.9%, and E = 50%). The main differences emerged regarding the management of stage I and stage IIA disease, likely because of cultural and geographical differences. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights the common efforts of GCT experts in Europe and Canada to maintain high standards of treatment for patients with GCT with few changes in their management during the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Despite the chaos, disruptions, and fears fomented by the COVID-19 illness, oncology care teams in Italy, other European countries, and Canada are delivering the enormous promise of curative management strategies for patients with testicular cancer and other germ cell tumors. At the same time, these teams are applying safe and innovative solutions and sharing best practices to minimize frequency and intensity of patient contacts with thinly stretched health care capacity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/trends , Europe/epidemiology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Humans , Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/trends
18.
Bull Cancer ; 107(6): 629-632, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618677

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 infection, many recommendations have been made. However, the very nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemias and their treatment in children and adolescents led the Leukemia Committee of the French Society for the fight against cancers and leukemias in children and adolescents (SFCE) to propose more specific recommendations, even if data for this population are still scarce. They may have to evolve according to the rapid evolution of knowledge on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/epidemiology , Adolescent , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/pharmacokinetics , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Combined Modality Therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Management , Down Syndrome/epidemiology , Drug Interactions , Febrile Neutropenia/chemically induced , Febrile Neutropenia/drug therapy , Febrile Neutropenia/prevention & control , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/therapy , Recurrence , Remission Induction , Risk , Risk Assessment , Salvage Therapy , Symptom Assessment
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