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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 7225, 2022 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890252

ABSTRACT

Tear fluid cytokine levels may serve as biomarkers of innate immune system response against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, our aim was to analyze panel of selected inflammatory cytokines in tears of COVID-19 patients in relation to presence of SARS-CoV-2 viral load in conjunctival secretions. In this study concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1b, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p70, GM-CSF, and IFN-γ were determined by a magnetic bead assay in tear film collected from 232 symptomatic COVID-19 patients. SARS-CoV-2 ocular infection was confirmed based on positive conjunctival swab-based RT-PCR testing. Viral RNA in conjunctival sac was detected in 21 patients (9%). No relation between presence and the duration of ophthalmic symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 infection detected in conjunctival secretions was found. The tear film concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, IL-8 and GM-CSF were found to be significantly greater among patients with positive conjunctival swab results as compared to the group negative for SARS-CoV-2 in conjunctival sac. Our current data depict a group of inflammatory mediators in human tears, which may play a significant role in ocular pathology of SARS-CoV-2 conjunctival infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Conjunctiva , Cytokines , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Humans , Interleukin-5 , Interleukin-8 , SARS-CoV-2 , Tears , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
2.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 115(3): 790-798, 2022 03 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The modulating effect of vitamin D on cytokine concentrations in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the effect of a single high dose of vitamin D3 on cytokines, chemokines, and growth factor in hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19. METHODS: This is a post hoc, ancillary, and exploratory analysis from a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 were recruited from 2 hospitals in São Paulo, Brazil. Of 240 randomly assigned patients, 200 were assessed in this study and randomly assigned to receive a single oral dose of 200,000 IU vitamin D3 (n = 101) or placebo (n = 99). The primary outcome was hospital length of stay, which has been published in our previous study. The prespecified secondary outcomes were serum concentrations of IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The post hoc exploratory secondary outcomes were IL-4, IL-12p70, IL-17A, IFN-γ, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-8, IFN-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein-1ß (MIP-1ß), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and leukocyte count. Generalized estimating equations for repeated measures, with Bonferroni's adjustment, were used for testing all outcomes. RESULTS: The study included 200 patients with a mean ± SD age of 55.5 ± 14.3 y and BMI of 32.2 ± 7.1 kg/m2, of which 109 (54.5%) were male. GM-CSF concentrations showed a significant group-by-time interaction effect (P = 0.04), although the between-group difference at postintervention after Bonferroni's adjustment was not significant. No significant effects were observed for the other outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings do not support the use of a single dose of 200,000 IU vitamin D3, compared with placebo, for the improvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factor in hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT04449718.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Chemokines/drug effects , Cholecalciferol/administration & dosage , Cytokines/drug effects , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/drug effects , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/drug effects , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , Brazil , COVID-19/immunology , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
4.
Clin Sci (Lond) ; 135(22): 2559-2573, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541262

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key participant in, and a clinical target for, the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therapeutic inhibition of GM-CSF signalling using monoclonal antibodies to the α-subunit of the GM-CSF receptor (GMCSFRα) has shown clear benefit in patients with RA, giant cell arteritis (GCAs) and some efficacy in severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, GM-CSF autoantibodies are associated with the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a rare lung disease characterised by alveolar macrophage (AM) dysfunction and the accumulation of surfactant lipids. We assessed how the anti-GMCSFRα approach might impact surfactant turnover in the airway. Female C57BL/6J mice received a mouse-GMCSFRα blocking antibody (CAM-3003) twice per week for up to 24 weeks. A parallel, comparator cohort of the mouse PAP model, GM-CSF receptor ß subunit (GMCSFRß) knock-out (KO), was maintained up to 16 weeks. We assessed lung tissue histopathology alongside lung phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism using stable isotope lipidomics. GMCSFRß KO mice reproduced the histopathological and biochemical features of PAP, accumulating surfactant PC in both broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lavaged lung tissue. The incorporation pattern of methyl-D9-choline showed impaired catabolism and not enhanced synthesis. In contrast, chronic supra-pharmacological CAM-3003 exposure (100 mg/kg) over 24 weeks did not elicit a histopathological PAP phenotype despite some changes in lung PC catabolism. Lack of significant impairment of AM catabolic function supports clinical observations that therapeutic antibodies to this pathway have not been associated with PAP in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis/immunology , Pulmonary Surfactants/metabolism , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Autoantibodies/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19/immunology , Choline/analogs & derivatives , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/chemistry , Inflammation , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Phenotype , Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surface-Active Agents
5.
Clin Sci (Lond) ; 135(22): 2559-2573, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517650

ABSTRACT

Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key participant in, and a clinical target for, the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therapeutic inhibition of GM-CSF signalling using monoclonal antibodies to the α-subunit of the GM-CSF receptor (GMCSFRα) has shown clear benefit in patients with RA, giant cell arteritis (GCAs) and some efficacy in severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, GM-CSF autoantibodies are associated with the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a rare lung disease characterised by alveolar macrophage (AM) dysfunction and the accumulation of surfactant lipids. We assessed how the anti-GMCSFRα approach might impact surfactant turnover in the airway. Female C57BL/6J mice received a mouse-GMCSFRα blocking antibody (CAM-3003) twice per week for up to 24 weeks. A parallel, comparator cohort of the mouse PAP model, GM-CSF receptor ß subunit (GMCSFRß) knock-out (KO), was maintained up to 16 weeks. We assessed lung tissue histopathology alongside lung phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism using stable isotope lipidomics. GMCSFRß KO mice reproduced the histopathological and biochemical features of PAP, accumulating surfactant PC in both broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lavaged lung tissue. The incorporation pattern of methyl-D9-choline showed impaired catabolism and not enhanced synthesis. In contrast, chronic supra-pharmacological CAM-3003 exposure (100 mg/kg) over 24 weeks did not elicit a histopathological PAP phenotype despite some changes in lung PC catabolism. Lack of significant impairment of AM catabolic function supports clinical observations that therapeutic antibodies to this pathway have not been associated with PAP in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis/immunology , Pulmonary Surfactants/metabolism , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Autoantibodies/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19/immunology , Choline/analogs & derivatives , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/chemistry , Inflammation , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Phenotype , Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surface-Active Agents
6.
J Clin Invest ; 131(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495792

ABSTRACT

Acute COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is characterized by diverse clinical presentations, ranging from asymptomatic infection to fatal respiratory failure, and often associated with varied longer-term sequelae. Over the past 18 months, it has become apparent that inappropriate immune responses contribute to the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19. Researchers working at the intersection of COVID-19 and autoimmunity recently gathered at an American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Noel R. Rose Colloquium to address the current state of knowledge regarding two important questions: Does established autoimmunity predispose to severe COVID-19? And, at the same time, can SARS-CoV-2 infection trigger de novo autoimmunity? Indeed, work to date has demonstrated that 10% to 15% of patients with critical COVID-19 pneumonia exhibit autoantibodies against type I interferons, suggesting that preexisting autoimmunity underlies severe disease in some patients. Other studies have identified functional autoantibodies following infection with SARS-CoV-2, such as those that promote thrombosis or antagonize cytokine signaling. These autoantibodies may arise from a predominantly extrafollicular B cell response that is more prone to generating autoantibody-secreting B cells. This Review highlights the current understanding, evolving concepts, and unanswered questions provided by this unique opportunity to determine mechanisms by which a viral infection can be exacerbated by, and even trigger, autoimmunity. The potential role of autoimmunity in post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 is also discussed.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/chemistry , Autoimmunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Signal Transduction , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophage Activation , Male , Mice , Phospholipids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt A): 108292, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487772

ABSTRACT

Leukopenia is a common manifestation of many diseases, including global outbreak SAS-CoV-2 infection. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM -CSF) has been proved to be effective in promoting lymphocyte regeneration, but adverse immunological effects have also emerged. This study aim to investigate the effect of GM -CSF on BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire while promoting lymphocyte regeneration. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) and GM -CSF were used to inhibit and stimulate bone marrow hematopoiesis, respectively. High throughput sequencing was applied to detect the characteristics of BCR CDR3 repertoire in controls, CTX group and GM -CSF group. The white blood cells (WBCs) were quickly reduced (P < 0.05) with lymphocytes decreasing causing by CTX, and the WBCs and lymphocytes returned to the level of controls after GM -CSF treatment. The diversity of BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire was also significantly decreased in CTX group. Although there is still a big gap from the controls, the diversity was picked up after GM -CSF treatment. The expression of IGHD01-01, IGHD02-14 and IGHJ04-01 with high-frequency usage regularly and significantly changed in three groups, and many genes with low-frequency usage lost in CTX group and did not reappear in GM -CSF group. Moreover, two shared sequences and accounted for the highest proportion in GM -CSF group have been detected in animal model of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. These results revealed that GM -CSF can partially restore changes in the BCR heavy chain CDR3 repertoire while promoting lymphocyte regeneration, but it may also lead to rearrangement, proliferation and activation of abnormal B cells, which can provide a basis for further study on the adverse immunological effects and mechanism of GM -CSF treatment.


Subject(s)
Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Leukopenia/immunology , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/drug effects , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/metabolism , Animals , Complementarity Determining Regions/drug effects , Complementarity Determining Regions/genetics , Complementarity Determining Regions/metabolism , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/metabolism , Immunoglobulin Joining Region/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Joining Region/metabolism , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/drug effects , Immunoglobulin Variable Region/metabolism , Leukocytes/drug effects , Leukopenia/chemically induced , Leukopenia/drug therapy , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology
8.
J Innate Immun ; 14(3): 243-256, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476900

ABSTRACT

During inflammatory responses, monocytes are recruited into inflamed tissues, where they become monocyte-derived macrophages and acquire pro-inflammatory and tissue-damaging effects in response to the surrounding environment. In fact, monocyte-derived macrophage subsets are major pathogenic cells in inflammatory pathologies. Strikingly, the transcriptome of pathogenic monocyte-derived macrophage subsets resembles the gene profile of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-primed monocyte-derived human macrophages (M-MØ). As M-MØ display a characteristic cytokine profile after activation (IL10high TNFlow IL23low IL6low), we sought to determine the transcriptional signature of M-MØ upon exposure to pathogenic stimuli. Activation of M-MØ led to the acquisition of a distinctive transcriptional profile characterized by the induction of a group of genes (Gene set 1) highly expressed by pathogenic monocyte-derived macrophages in COVID-19 and whose presence in tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) correlates with the expression of macrophage-specific markers (CD163, SPI1) and IL10. Indeed, Gene set 1 expression was primarily dependent on ERK/p38 and STAT3 activation, and transcriptional analysis and neutralization experiments revealed that IL-10 is not only required for the expression of a subset of genes within Gene set 1 but also significantly contributes to the idiosyncratic gene signature of activated M-MØ. Our results indicate that activation of M-CSF-dependent monocyte-derived macrophages induces a distinctive gene expression profile, which is partially dependent on IL-10, and identifies a gene set potentially helpful for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Cell Differentiation , Cells, Cultured , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Monocytes/metabolism
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 748097, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477829

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 infection [coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)] is associated with severe lymphopenia and impaired immune response, including expansion of myeloid cells with regulatory functions, e.g., so-called low-density neutrophils, containing granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (LDNs/PMN-MDSCs). These cells have been described in both infections and cancer and are known for their immunosuppressive activity. In the case of COVID-19, long-term complications have been frequently observed (long-COVID). In this context, we aimed to investigate the immune response of COVID-19 convalescents after a mild or asymptomatic course of disease. We enrolled 13 convalescents who underwent a mild or asymptomatic infection with SARS-CoV-2, confirmed by a positive result of the PCR test, and 13 healthy donors without SARS-CoV-2 infection in the past. Whole blood was used for T-cell subpopulation and LDNs/PMN-MDSCs analysis. LDNs/PMN-MDSCs and normal density neutrophils (NDNs) were sorted out by FACS and used for T-cell proliferation assay with autologous T cells activated with anti-CD3 mAb. Serum samples were used for the detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing IgG and GM-CSF concentration. Our results showed that in convalescents, even 3 months after infection, an elevated level of LDNs/PMN-MDSCs is still maintained in the blood, which correlates negatively with the level of CD8+ and double-negative T cells. Moreover, LDNs/PMN-MDSCs and NDNs showed a tendency for affecting the production of anti-SARS-CoV-2 S1 neutralizing antibodies. Surprisingly, our data showed that in addition to LDNs/PMN-MDSCs, NDNs from convalescents also inhibit proliferation of autologous T cells. Additionally, in the convalescent sera, we detected significantly higher concentrations of GM-CSF, indicating the role of emergency granulopoiesis. We conclude that in mild or asymptomatic COVID-19 convalescents, the neutrophil dysfunction, including propagation of PD-L1-positive LDNs/PMN-MDSCs and NDNs, is responsible for long-term endotype of immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/complications , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Female , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/blood , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged
10.
Cell Rep ; 37(1): 109773, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442298

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is less severe than it is in adults. We perform a longitudinal analysis of the early innate responses in children and adults with mild infection within household clusters. Children display fewer symptoms than adults do, despite similar initial viral load, and mount a robust anti-viral immune signature typical of the SARS-CoV-2 infection and characterized by early interferon gene responses; increases in cytokines, such as CXCL10 and GM-CSF; and changes in blood cell numbers. When compared with adults, the antiviral response resolves faster (within a week of symptoms), monocytes and dendritic cells are more transiently activated, and genes associated with B cell activation appear earlier in children. Nonetheless, these differences do not have major effects on the quality of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses. Our findings reveal that better early control of inflammation as observed in children may be key for rapidly controlling infection and limiting the disease course.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcriptome , Adaptive Immunity , Adolescent , Adult , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Child , Child, Preschool , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/virology , Interferons/metabolism , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Viral Load , Young Adult
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 706186, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394759

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sargramostim [recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu GM-CSF)] was approved by US FDA in 1991 to accelerate bone marrow recovery in diverse settings of bone marrow failure and is designated on the list of FDA Essential Medicines, Medical Countermeasures, and Critical Inputs. Other important biological activities including accelerating tissue repair and modulating host immunity to infection and cancer via the innate and adaptive immune systems are reported in pre-clinical models but incompletely studied in humans. OBJECTIVE: Assess safety and efficacy of sargramostim in cancer and other diverse experimental and clinical settings. METHODS AND RESULTS: We systematically reviewed PubMed, Cochrane and TRIP databases for clinical data on sargramostim in cancer. In a variety of settings, sargramostim after exposure to bone marrow-suppressing agents accelerated hematologic recovery resulting in fewer infections, less therapy-related toxicity and sometimes improved survival. As an immune modulator, sargramostim also enhanced anti-cancer responses in solid cancers when combined with conventional therapies, for example with immune checkpoint inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Sargramostim accelerates hematologic recovery in diverse clinical settings and enhances anti-cancer responses with a favorable safety profile. Uses other than in hematologic recovery are less-well studied; more data are needed on immune-enhancing benefits. We envision significantly expanded use of sargramostim in varied immune settings. Sargramostim has the potential to reverse the immune suppression associated with sepsis, trauma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and COVID-19. Further, sargramostim therapy has been promising in the adjuvant setting with vaccines and for anti-microbial-resistant infections and treating autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and gastrointestinal, peripheral arterial and neuro-inflammatory diseases. It also may be useful as an adjuvant in anti-cancer immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Humans , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
12.
Immunotherapy ; 13(12): 1011-1029, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362211

ABSTRACT

The use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with metastatic melanoma generates clinical benefit, including improved survival. Yet disease resistance and immune-related adverse events persist as unmet needs. Sargramostim, a yeast-derived recombinant human GM-CSF, has shown clinical activity against diverse solid tumors, including metastatic melanoma. Here we review the use of sargramostim for treatment of advanced melanoma. Potential sargramostim applications in melanoma draw on the unique ability of GM-CSF to link innate and adaptive immune responses. We review preclinical and translational data describing the mechanism of action of sargramostim and synergy with immune checkpoint inhibitors to enhance efficacy and reduce treatment-related toxicity.


Lay abstract Immune checkpoint inhibitors are medications that help the immune system to fight cancer. Side effects with these medicines may occur because the immune system may attack healthy cells. Sargramostim is a medication that is similar to a protein in the body (GM-CSF). Studies have shown that sargramostim can fight cancer, including melanoma. When sargramostim is used with immune checkpoint inhibitors, the body's natural defense to fight cancer (the immune system) is boosted and some side effects are reduced. This article reviews how GM-CSF is thought to boost the immune system's response against cancer in the laboratory and in animal models. We also review the use of sargramostim alone and combined with ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Melanoma/drug therapy , Animals , Drug Synergism , Humans , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16212, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351976

ABSTRACT

During 2020, understanding the molecular mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection (the cause of COVID-19) became a scientific priority due to the devastating effects of the COVID-19. Many researchers have studied the effect of this viral infection on lung epithelial transcriptomes and deposited data in public repositories. Comprehensive analysis of such data could pave the way for development of efficient vaccines and effective drugs. In the current study, we obtained high-throughput gene expression data associated with human lung epithelial cells infected with respiratory viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, SARS, H1N1, avian influenza, rhinovirus and Dhori, then performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify SARS-CoV-2 exclusive genes. The analysis yielded seven SARS-CoV-2 specific genes including CSF2 [GM-CSF] (colony-stimulating factor 2) and calcium-binding proteins (such as S100A8 and S100A9), which are known to be involved in respiratory diseases. The analyses showed that genes involved in inflammation are commonly altered by infection of SARS-CoV-2 and influenza viruses. Furthermore, results of protein-protein interaction analyses were consistent with a functional role of CSF2 and S100A9 in COVID-19 disease. In conclusion, our analysis revealed cellular genes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection of the human lung epithelium; these are potential therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , Transcriptome , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Calgranulin A/genetics , Calgranulin A/metabolism , Calgranulin B/genetics , Calgranulin B/metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/genetics , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
14.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1087, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333934

ABSTRACT

The introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors has demonstrated significant improvements in survival for subsets of cancer patients. However, they carry significant and sometimes life-threatening toxicities. Prompt prediction and monitoring of immune toxicities have the potential to maximise the benefits of immune checkpoint therapy. Herein, we develop a digital nanopillar SERS platform that achieves real-time single cytokine counting and enables dynamic tracking of immune toxicities in cancer patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment - broader applications are anticipated in other disease indications. By analysing four prospective cytokine biomarkers that initiate inflammatory responses, the digital nanopillar SERS assay achieves both highly specific and highly sensitive cytokine detection down to attomolar level. Significantly, we report the capability of the assay to longitudinally monitor 10 melanoma patients during immune inhibitor blockade treatment. Here, we show that elevated cytokine concentrations predict for higher risk of developing severe immune toxicities in our pilot cohort of patients.


Subject(s)
Immunotherapy/methods , Melanoma/therapy , Monitoring, Immunologic/methods , Spectrum Analysis, Raman/methods , Chemokine CX3CL1/immunology , Chemokine CX3CL1/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Ipilimumab/adverse effects , Ipilimumab/immunology , Ipilimumab/therapeutic use , Melanoma/immunology , Melanoma/metabolism , Microscopy, Confocal/methods , Pilot Projects , Reproducibility of Results
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304673

ABSTRACT

Macrophages (Mφs) are instrumental regulators of the immune response whereby they acquire diverse functional phenotypes following their exposure to microenvironmental cues that govern their differentiation from monocytes and their activation. The complexity and diversity of the mycobacterial cell wall have empowered mycobacteria with potent immunomodulatory capacities. A heat-killed (HK) whole-cell preparation of Mycobacterium obuense (M. obuense) has shown promise as an adjunctive immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer. Moreover, HK M. obuense has been shown to trigger the differentiation of human monocytes into a monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) type named Mob-MDM. However, the transcriptomic profile and functional properties of Mob-MDMs remain undefined during an activation state. Here, we characterized cytokine/chemokine release patterns and transcriptomic profiles of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon γ (IFNγ)-activated human MDMs that were differentiated with HK M. obuense (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), macrophage colony-stimulating factor M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)). Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) demonstrated a unique cytokine/chemokine release pattern (interleukin (IL)-10low, IL-12/23p40low, IL-23p19/p40low, chemokine (C-x-C) motif ligand (CXCL)9low) that was distinct from those of M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Furthermore, M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) maintained IL-10 production at significantly higher levels compared to GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) despite being activated with M1-Mφ-activating stimuli. Comparative RNA sequencing analysis pointed to a distinct transcriptome profile for Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) relative to both M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) that comprised 417 transcripts. Functional gene-set enrichment analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of signaling pathways and biological processes that were uniquely related to Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Our findings lay a foundation for the potential integration of HK M. obuense in specific cell-based immunotherapeutic modalities such as adoptive transfer of Mφs (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)) for cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/immunology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Interferon-gamma/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophage Activation/drug effects , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Transcriptome
17.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 49, 2021 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238700

ABSTRACT

A SARS-like coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) that killed more than 3.3 million people worldwide. Like the SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 also employs a receptor-binding motif (RBM) of its spike protein to bind a host receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), to gain entry. Currently, several mRNA or adenoviral vaccines encoding for the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 are being used to boost antibodies capable of inhibiting spike-ACE2 interaction and viral entry. However, recent evidence has also suggested an anti-inflammatory effect of spike-reactive antibodies, suggesting that some SARS-CoV-2 spike-based vaccines may elicit protective antibodies capable of inhibiting GM-CSF production and COVID-19 progression.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
18.
J Leukoc Biol ; 111(1): 261-267, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147560

ABSTRACT

A severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has recently caused a pandemic COVID-19 disease that infected approximately 94 million and killed more than 2,000,000 people worldwide. Like the SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2 also employs a receptor-binding motif (RBM) of its envelope spike protein for binding the host angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to gain viral entry. Currently, extensive efforts are being made to produce vaccines against a surface fragment of a SARS-CoV-2, such as the spike protein, in order to boost protective antibodies that can inhibit virus-ACE2 interaction to prevent viral entry. It was previously unknown how spike protein-targeting antibodies would affect innate inflammatory responses to SARS-CoV-2 infections. Here we generated a highly purified recombinant protein corresponding to the RBM of SARS-CoV-2, and used it to screen for cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We found two RBM-binding mAbs that competitively inhibited its interaction with human ACE2, and specifically blocked the RBM-induced GM-CSF secretion in both human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and murine macrophage cultures. Our findings have suggested a possible strategy to prevent SARS-CoV-2-elicited "cytokine storm," and revealed a potentially anti-inflammatory and protective mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 spike-based vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Motifs , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Macrophages/metabolism , Mice , Protein Binding , RAW 264.7 Cells , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism
20.
Sci Immunol ; 6(56)2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099742

ABSTRACT

Hyperinflammation contributes to lung injury and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with high mortality in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To understand the underlying mechanisms involved in lung pathology, we investigated the role of the lung-specific immune response. We profiled immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood collected from COVID-19 patients with severe disease and bacterial pneumonia patients not associated with viral infection. By tracking T cell clones across tissues, we identified clonally expanded tissue-resident memory-like Th17 cells (Trm17 cells) in the lungs even after viral clearance. These Trm17 cells were characterized by a a potentially pathogenic cytokine expression profile of IL17A and CSF2 (GM-CSF). Interactome analysis suggests that Trm17 cells can interact with lung macrophages and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which have been associated with disease severity and lung damage. High IL-17A and GM-CSF protein levels in the serum of COVID-19 patients were associated with a more severe clinical course. Collectively, our study suggests that pulmonary Trm17 cells are one potential orchestrator of the hyperinflammation in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Immunologic Memory , Lung/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Clone Cells , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/immunology , Lung/pathology , Myeloid Cells , Pneumonia, Bacterial/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology
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