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2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862780

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antibody seroprevalence in rural communities remains poorly investigated. We compared the SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in two Greek communities in June and July 2021 after the end of the Delta-driven pandemic wave that started in November 2020. One community was affected worse than the other. METHODS: The SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Quant method (Architect, Abbott, IL, USA) was used for antibody testing. RESULTS: We found a high rate of SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity in both communities, approaching 77.5%. In the area with a higher burden of COVID-19, Malesina, seropositivity was achieved with vaccine-acquired and naturally acquired immunity, whereas in the low-burden context of Domokos, the high rates of seropositivity were achieved mainly with vaccination. Previously infected individuals were less likely to be vaccinated than previously uninfected adults. The antibody titers were significantly higher in previously infected, vaccinated participants than in unvaccinated ones. In total, 4% and 10% of the unvaccinated population were diagnosed seropositive for the first time while not knowing about the previous infection. Age and gender did not impact antibody titers in high- or low-burden contexts. CONCLUSIONS: Before the Omicron pandemic wave, herd immunity was reached in different contexts in Greece. Higher antibody titers were measured in infected vaccinated individuals than in infected unvaccinated ones.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies
3.
Inquiry ; 59: 469580221097829, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861834

ABSTRACT

The aim of the current study was to examine the mental well-being of healthcare personnel (HCP) working in COVID-19 units in Greece and to calculate the prevalence of burnout (BO) amongst them. A questionnaire based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Medical Personnel was utilized between February 21st, 2021 and March 5th, 2021. A total of 190 HCP responded to the questionnaire, of which 73.7% were nurses and midwives. The mean age of the participants was 38.3 (8.4) years. Overall, 71.6% of the participants had a high BO score, while 20.5% had a moderate and 7.9% had a low BO score. Night shifts in COVID-19 wards and job dissatisfaction were significantly associated with a high BO score (P = .03 and P < .0001, respectively). The majority of HCP working in COVID-19 wards in Greece is experiencing high levels of overall BO and emotional exhaustion.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Adult , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Greece/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(5): e057084, 2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854348

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 has been extensively deployed during COVID-19 pandemic. One efficient method to evaluate response to vaccination is the assessment of humoral immunity by measuring SARS-CoV-2 antibody titres. We investigated the association between anthropometric parameters (age, body mass index), smoking, diabetes, statin use, hypertension, levels of 25(OH)D and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and SARS-CoV-2 antibody titres after vaccination. DESIGN: In this longitudinal observational cohort study, 712 subjects were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies 3 months after the second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify which factors are associated with the antibody titres. SETTING: Healthcare units of western Greece (University Hospital of Patras and "St Andrews" State General Hospital of Patras). PARTICIPANTS: All adults receiving their second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine at the participating healthcare units were eligible to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria were SARS-CoV-2 infection or positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody titre at baseline. Patients who did not provide all necessary information were excluded from our analyses. RESULTS: We found age to be negatively associated with antibody titre (-0.005; 95% CI -0.009 to -0.001, p=0.0073), as was male gender (-0.11; 95% CI -0.1738 to -0.04617, p=0.0008). The interaction of age and gender was significant (-0.01090; 95% CI -0.01631 to -0.005490, p<0.0001), highlighting that the rate of decline in antibody titre with increasing age tends to be higher in men rather than in women. No linear trend was found between DHEAS levels and antibody titres when the lower quartile of DHEAS levels was used as reference. Tobacco use was associated with low antibody titre (-0.1097; 95% CI -0.174 to -0.046, p=0.0008) but overweight, obese or underweight subjects had similar antibody responses to normal-weight individuals. Although subjects with diabetes and hypertension had numerically lower antibody titres, this association was not statistically significant. Vitamin D levels showed no clear relationships with antibody titres. CONCLUSIONS: Age, male gender and tobacco use are negatively associated with antibody titres after COVID-19 vaccination, but our data showed no clear correlation with vitamin D levels. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04954651; Results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vitamin D
5.
Sci Total Environ ; 838(Pt 1): 155604, 2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819599

ABSTRACT

The concentrations of uranium and nine elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in snow and rainwater samples were determined. Samples were collected in Thessaloniki-northern Greece in three sites, one in the industrial area close to an oil production power plant and two in the centre of the city. Snow samples were collected during January-February 2019 and 2021 whereas in the case of rainwater, a two-year survey has been performed during 2019 and 2020. The activity concentrations of the uranium radioisotopes were measured by alpha spectrometry whereas the metal(loid)s concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The elevated concentrations of uranium (U) and the deviation of the isotopic ratio of U-234/U-238 from the equilibrium value indicated intensive dissolution of uranium. The results were analyzed using statistical analysis (Shapiro-Wilk, Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests). The obtained data and the calculated enrichment factors (Efs) denote variation of the concentration values between industrial and urban area and different elemental distribution influenced from anthropogenic contributions, meteorological conditions and the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metals, Heavy , Uranium , Environmental Monitoring/methods , Greece , Humans , Metals, Heavy/analysis , Pandemics , Snow/chemistry , Uranium/analysis
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(4): e191-e196, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806698

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine and associated factors in a sample of healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS: An on-line cross-sectional study with 885 HCWs was conducted in Greece during August 2021. We measured socio-demographic data of HCWs and attitudes towards vaccination and the COVID-19 pandemic. A convenience sample was used since the questionnaire was distributed through social media and emails. RESULTS: The majority of HCWs were vaccinated against the COVID-19 (91.5%). Females and HCWs with a history of seasonal influenza vaccination had a greater probability to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Also, increased self-perceived knowledge regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and increased trust in COVID-19 vaccines were associated with COVID-19 vaccine uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Policymakers and scientists should develop novel strategies to improve COVID-19 vaccine uptake among HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Greece , Health Personnel , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pandemics
7.
Acta Trop ; 230: 106391, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1803335

ABSTRACT

Since 2010 when West Nile virus (WNV) emerged in Greece, it causes seasonal outbreaks of human infections almost every year. During May-October of 2019-2021 a total number of 51,504 Culex pipiens mosquitoes were trapped in all seven regional units of Central Macedonia in northern Greece. They were grouped into 1099 pools and tested for WNV. The virus was detected in 5% of the mosquito pools (1.5%, 3.6% and 9.6% pools in 2019, 2020, and 2021, respectively), with significant rate differences among the regional units and years. The highest maximum likelihood estimation for WNV infection rates calculated per 1000 mosquitoes for 2019 and 2020 were 1.89 and 3.84 in Serres, and 7.08 for 2021 in Pella regional unit. Sixteen whole genome sequences were taken by applying a recently described PCR-based next generation sequencing protocol. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequences belonged to the Central European clade of WNV lineage 2, and that a virus strain introduced in Greece in 2019 continued to circulate and spread further during 2020-2021. The data are useful for public health and mosquito control programs' operational scheduling, while the whole genome sequences are an added value for molecular epidemiology and evolutionary studies.


Subject(s)
Culex , West Nile Fever , West Nile virus , Animals , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Phylogeny , West Nile Fever/epidemiology , West Nile virus/genetics
8.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0263977, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798359

ABSTRACT

The results of a simulation-based evaluation of several policies for vaccine rollout are reported, particularly focusing on the effects of delaying the second dose of two-dose vaccines. In the presence of limited vaccine supply, the specific policy choice is a pressing issue for several countries worldwide, and the adopted course of action will affect the extension or easing of non-pharmaceutical interventions in the next months. We employ a suitably generalised, age-structure, stochastic SEIR (Susceptible → Exposed → Infectious → Removed) epidemic model that can accommodate quantitative descriptions of the major effects resulting from distinct vaccination strategies. The different rates of social contacts among distinct age-groups (as well as some other model parameters) are informed by a recent survey conducted in Greece, but the conclusions are much more widely applicable. The results are summarised and evaluated in terms of the total number of deaths and infections as well as life years lost. The optimal strategy is found to be one based on fully vaccinating the elderly/at risk as quickly as possible, while extending the time-interval between the two vaccine doses to 12 weeks for all individuals below 75 years old, in agreement with epidemic theory which suggests targeting a combination of susceptibility and infectivity. This policy, which is similar to the approaches adopted in the UK and in Canada, is found to be effective in reducing deaths and life years lost in the period while vaccination is still being carried out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792677

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been going on for the last two years and it has affected our society and, amongst other things, has had a negative impact on blood donation, which has led to a significant reduction in blood supplies worldwide. The imposed restrictions in terms of physical presence and transportation, and the fear of the unknown, have aggravated the situation. In Greece, after the first cases of COVID-19 were reported, the blood supplies at the blood transfusion units (BTUs) were dramatically reduced. Although the blood transfusions were lessened during the COVID-19 pandemic period, the blood stocks at all the BTUs of the country were also reduced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Attitude , Blood Donors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(1): 6985, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789840

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Primary health care (PHC), the cornerstone of health systems, has an important role in infectious disease control. The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has put a burden on health systems worldwide and especially on healthcare workers at the first line delivering their services in remote areas of Greece. This study investigates preparedness and awareness level of primary healthcare workers (PHCWs) and their risk perception in managing the pandemic during its initial phase. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in public PHC units in Greece. A web-based 14-item questionnaire, tested in a pilot study, was administered by a pre-existing panel of the Education and Research Network in PHC of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. Associations were assessed between epidemic response awareness, risk perception, participant demographics and work settings. Participants were grouped by profession in first-line physicians (general practitioners, internal medicine specialists, pediatricians), first-line non-physicians (nurses, health visitors, paramedics) and second-line PHCWs (dentists, microbiologists, administrators, midwifes, laboratory technicians, nutritionists and social workers). Univariate logistic regression and multivariable analysis were performed and linear regression was performed to examine the effect of participants' awareness of the preparedness plan to their working area characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 441 PHCWs participated in the survey. Risks were perceived at a lower level by second-line PHCWs than by first-line PHCWs (B=-0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.49- -0.08; p=0.028). Older PHCWs had less concerns than younger PHCWs (B=-0.04, 95%CI -0.08- -0.01; p=0.025) and more experienced participants had more concerns than less experienced (B=0.04, 95%CI 0.00,0.07; p=0.050). PHCWs in rural settings presented with more preparedness awareness, compared to PHCWs in urban areas (B=1.10, 95%CI 0.28,1.92; p=0.008), while PHCWs living with high risk individuals showed less situation awareness (-0.55, 95%CI -0.95-0.16; p=0.006). CONCLUSION: PHCWs in rural areas revealed a relatively high awareness of the response measures and management protocol requirements that were in place, compared to their colleagues in urban areas. As expected, first-line PHCWs directly exposed to emergencies expressed more concerns than second-line PHCWs. Learning from the challenges occurring during the initial phase of the pandemic could help PHC facilities address COVID-19 effectively and PHCWs' sense of security and confidence could be augmented, even when working in remote areas of the country. When planning training, distributing equipment and proposing protocols, the characteristics of the area and the needs of PHCWs, and population should be cautiously considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Cross-Sectional Studies , Greece/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785688

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on health, economy, society and education. In the effort to return to normalcy, according to the instructions of the Greek Government for the resumption of the operation of schools, a screening Rapid Antigen Detection Test with the method of self-testing is required for students twice per week, for the early identification and isolation of positive cases. We aimed to pivotally investigate the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to self-testing procedures against COVID-19 among Greek students. A questionnaire was distributed to a convenient sample of students in the region of Athens. Information about the vaccination coverage against SARS-CoV-2 was also obtained. Our study included 1000 students, with 70% of them having an average grade at school. Most of the participants were aware of coronavirus (98.6%) and the self-test (95.5%). The vast majority of students (97%) performed self-testing twice per week, with the 70% them being assisted by someone else. Nearly one sixth of the participants had been infected by COVID-19 (14%) while 36% of them have already been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. In conclusion, we report high compliance with the COVID-19 self-testing procedure among students in Attica, Greece. Older age adolescents are more likely to not comply with the regulations of self-testing. Consequently, tailored interventions targeted at older age adolescents are warranted in order to increase the acceptability of self-testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Self-Testing , Students
12.
Viruses ; 14(4)2022 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776360

ABSTRACT

In-depth understanding of the immune response provoked by SARS-CoV-2 infection is necessary, as there is a great risk of reinfection and a difficulty in achieving herd immunity due to a decline in both antibody concentration and avidity. Avidity testing, however, could overcome variability in the immune response associated with sex or clinical symptoms, and thus differentiate between recent and past infections. In this context, here, we analyzed SARS-CoV-2 antibody kinetics and avidity in Greek hospitalized (26%) and non-hospitalized (74%) COVID-19 patients (N = 71) in the course of up to 15 months after their infection to improve the accuracy of the serological diagnosis in dating the onset of the infection. The results showed that IgG-S1 levels decline significantly at four months (p = 0.0239) in both groups of patients and are higher in hospitalized ones (up to 2.1-fold, p < 0.001). Additionally, hospitalized patients' titers drop greatly and are equalized to non-hospitalized ones only at a time-point of twelve to fifteen months. Antibody levels of women in total remain more stable months after infection, compared to men. Furthermore, we examined the differential maturation of IgG avidity after SARS-CoV-2 infection, showing an incomplete maturation of avidity that results in a plateau at four months after infection. We also defined 38.2% avidity (sensitivity: 58.9%, specificity: 90.91%) as an appropriate "cut-off" that could be used to determine the stage of infection before avidity reaches a plateau.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Greece , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Kinetics , Male , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 21(6): 853-859, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772530

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to estimate vaccination and susceptibility rates against vaccine-preventable diseases among healthcare personnel (HCP) in eight hospitals. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey. RESULTS: A total of 1284 HCP participated (physicians: 31.3%, nursing personnel: 36.6%, paramedical personnel: 11.1%, administrative personnel: 13.2%, supportive personnel: 7.3%). Vaccination rates were 32.9% against measles and mumps, 38.1% against rubella, 5.7% against varicella, 9.2% against hepatitis A, 65.8% against hepatitis B, 31.8% against tetanus-diphtheria, 7.1% against pertussis, 60.2% against influenza, and 80.1% against COVID-19. Susceptibility rates were as follows: 27.8% for measles, 39.6% for mumps, 33.4% for rubella, 22.2% for varicella, 86.3% for hepatitis A, 34.2% for hepatitis B, 68.2% for tetanus-diphtheria, and 92.9% for pertussis. Older HCP had higher susceptibility rates against mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus-diphtheria, and pertussis (p-values <0.001 for all). Mandatory vaccinations were supported by 81.85% of HCP. CONCLUSIONS: Although most HCPs supported mandatory vaccinations, significant vaccination gaps, and susceptibility rates were recorded. The proportion of susceptible HCP to measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella has increased in the past decade, mostly because of reduction in acquired cases of natural illness. Vaccination programs for HCP should be developed. A national registry to follow HCP's vaccination rates is urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chickenpox , Diphtheria , Hepatitis A , Hepatitis B , Measles , Mumps , Rubella , Tetanus , Whooping Cough , Attitude , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Measles/epidemiology , Measles/prevention & control , Mumps/epidemiology , Mumps/prevention & control , Tertiary Care Centers , Vaccination , Vaccination Coverage
14.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 210(4): 249-256, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764699

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 outbreak imposed stress worldwide, as daily routine changed almost overnight, with no time to prepare. A pandemic like this may trigger a chain reaction starting out as surprise, continuing to uncertainty and ending up either in adaptation or in symptoms of fear, anxiety, and/or depression. Resilience on the other hand could lessen anxiety and prove to be a prophylactic coping mechanism against distress. This study explored peritraumatic distress, intolerance of uncertainty (IU), and resilient coping in a sample of 2717 adults who voluntarily and anonymously participated in an online survey conducted in April 2020, in Greece.Results indicated a moderate pandemic-related mental burden and medium resilient coping and designated IU as a significant positive predictor of peritraumatic distress; resilient coping proved to be a significant moderator that alters the strength of the association between IU and distress reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Uncertainty
15.
Chirurgia (Bucur) ; 117(1): 61-68, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743107

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is an ongoing crisis. In light of mounting concerns about the training of surgical residents, we examined surgical residents perceptions regarding the pandemic's impact on their training. Methods: We developed an anonymous online questionnaire comprising 15 multiple-choice questions, which we sent via email to residents educated and employed in northern Greece hospitals. Our survey took place in January and February of 2021. Results: A total of 124 residents across a broad spectrum of surgical fields completed the questionnaire. The majority (51.6%) reported a significant decline in the number of operations performed weekly during the pandemic. Approximately 38% of the respondents stated that their surgical skills have been negatively affected to a significant extent, and 35.5% reported that their theoretical knowledge had deteriorated to a moderate extent. Almost half of them reported that they were satisfied with the online courses and a total of 67.7% affirmed the need to prolong their clinical training. Conclusions: The aims and scope of a surgical department include the provision of high-quality training to young surgeons. The impact of the pandemic on routine surgical activities has been dramatic. Our results clearly indicate that young surgeons have been significantly affected in terms of their training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
16.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(4): 1382-1387, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732621

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The first wave of coronavirus pandemic and concomitant restrictive measures affected sleep. We slept more than usual, but the quality was worse. As the pandemic continues, a second period of restrictive measures was initiated, and no data exist about their impact on sleep. The aim of this study was to compare quantity and quality of sleep between the two periods of restrictive measures, due to the Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic in Greece. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A web-based survey using a short 13-item questionnaire was created and was distributed online. This included information about demographic and professional data, quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sleep, degree of abidance in lockdown measures, and data about COVID-19 infection or close contact with active confirmed cases. RESULTS: A total of 1,078 questionnaires were evaluated (first period, n=963; second period, n=115). Sleep duration was shorter during the second lockdown (mean difference -0.51h; 95% confidence interval, (CI), -0.82, -0.19, p=0.002). Compared to usual habits, sleep increased in first wave (mean difference +0.37h; 95% CI, 0.26, 0.47; p<0.001) and decreased in second wave (mean difference -0.35h; 95% CI, -0.60, -0.09; p=0.009). Regarding quality of sleep, less participants reported good quality of sleep during the second wave compared to the first (p=0.006). Finally, compliance to restriction measures was lower and the prevalence of confirmed illness or close contact with COVID-19 cases among participants was higher during the second period than during the first one (p<0.001 and p=0.028, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that sleep duration increased during the first lockdown and decreased in the second one, when compared to usual habits. Moreover, sleep quality progressively deteriorated, as the restrictive measures due to coronavirus pandemic continued.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Adult , Female , Greece , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Psychiatriki ; 33(1): 21-30, 2022 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732590

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly changed everyday life around the world. The situation created by the COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to be associated with severe mental health problems in frontline medical and nursing staff. The aim of this study was to investigate exhaustion, disengagement, secondary traumatic stress, compassion satisfaction, burnout, as well as depression, anxiety and stress among internists in Greece, during the second lockdown period. Internists were approached through the Internal Medicine Society of Greece and a total of 117 participated in the study (response rate: 15.3%). The participants responded through a Google form on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - 21, the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) and the Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5 (ProQOL-5). Exhaustion was found in the majority of the participants (88%), 65.8% met the criteria for at least moderate levels of compassion satisfaction and 71.8% presented moderate levels of burnout. Furthermore, about half of the participants met the criteria for moderate to extremely severe levels of depression, anxiety and stress. Finally, regression analyses showed that depression was associated with both the OLBI and ProQOL-5 scales. The majority of the internists, during the lockdown period in Greece, were evaluated as "exhausted", with high rates of negative psychological symptoms. The present study, despite the limitations, highlights the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on internists, which triggered a shift in attention onto the treatment, and especially the prevention, of stressful situations for health professionals.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Greece/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life
18.
Int J Oncol ; 60(3)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726130

ABSTRACT

Biobanks constitute an integral part of precision medicine. They provide a repository of biospecimens that may be used to elucidate the pathophysiology, support diagnoses, and guide the treatment of diseases. The pilot biobank of rare malignant neoplasms has been established in the context of the Hellenic Network of Precision Medicine on Cancer and aims to enhance future clinical and/or research studies in Greece by collecting, processing, and storing rare malignant neoplasm samples with associated data. The biobank currently comprises 553 samples; 384 samples of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue malignancies, 72 samples of pediatric brain tumors and 97 samples of malignant skin neoplasms. In this article, sample collections and their individual significance in clinical research are described in detail along with computational methods developed specifically for this project. A concise review of the Greek biobanking landscape is also delineated, in addition to recommended technologies, methodologies and protocols that were integrated during the creation of the biobank. This project is expected to re­enforce current clinical and research studies, introduce advances in clinical and genetic research and potentially aid in future targeted drug discovery. It is our belief that the future of medical research is entwined with accessible, effective, and ethical biobanking and that our project will facilitate research planning in the '­omic' era by contributing high­quality samples along with their associated data.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/trends , Neoplasms/pathology , Precision Medicine/trends , Cell Line, Tumor , Greece , Humans , Precision Medicine/methods
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715377

ABSTRACT

Our aim was to study attitudes toward vaccinations, full vaccination rates and susceptibility rates against vaccine-preventable diseases among students attending a University Dental School. A total of 134 students were studied. Full vaccination rates were as follows: 56.5% against measles and mumps, 70.6% against rubella, 32.3% against varicella, 44.1% against hepatitis A, 45.9% against hepatitis B, and 87.7% against COVID-19. In the past decade, 63.2% of students had received a booster shot against tetanus-diphtheria, 47.8% against pertussis, and 28.1% against poliomyelitis, while 29.4% of students had been vaccinated against influenza in the past year. Susceptibility rates were 40.4% for measles, 42.4% for mumps, 28.3% for rubella, 32.3% for varicella, 55.3% for hepatitis A, 54.1% for hepatitis B, 36.8% for tetanus-diphtheria, 52.2% for pertussis, and 71.9% for poliomyelitis. Overall, 123 (91.8%) students favored mandatory vaccinations, mainly for all dentists (88.4%), while 11.6% of students favored them only for dentists who provide care to high-risk patients. In conclusion, most dental students favored mandatory vaccinations, yet we found significant vaccination gaps and susceptibility rates against vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccinations for dental students should be intensified. A national vaccination registry for healthcare personnel including dental students is urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccination Coverage , Attitude , Greece , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Dental , Vaccination
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