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1.
Perspect Public Health ; 142(2): 102-116, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741878

ABSTRACT

AIMS: (1) To catalogue and map all singing for health and wellbeing groups in the Republic of Ireland (ROI); (2) determine how they prioritise health outcomes; (3) understand what they consider success; and (4) identify gaps in provision. METHODS: A novel mixed-methods survey was distributed electronically through SING Ireland (the Choir Association of Ireland), artsandhealth.ie, and to 2736 potential stakeholders with links to singing for health and wellbeing and singing on social prescription (SSP) from October 2020 to April 2021. Thematic analysis was used to analyse four open-ended survey questions. RESULTS: A total of 185 singing for health and wellbeing groups were identified, with varied representation in each of the ROI's 26 counties. 35 groups were noted to have links to SSP. Gaps in provision for clinical and individual populations and for SSP were identified. Six themes related to the success of group singing for health and wellbeing programmes were determined: fostering and funding social and community connections; the people and the approach; enjoyment and atmosphere; musical and personal growth, programmatic structure and musical content; and the impact of Covid. CONCLUSION: The first-ever national mapping of group singing for health and wellbeing in the ROI, and one of few internationally, this study may serve as a roadmap for gathering information about existing singing for health and wellbeing provision and identifying geographical and clinical gaps internationally. Recommendations are included for future research to address gaps in provision, explore the feasibility of integrating SSP more widely and for further public health investment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Group Processes , Health Status , Singing , Emotions , Humans , Ireland , Public Health
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 120, 2022 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Team-based learning (TBL) combines active and collaborative learning, while incorporating aspects of the flipped classroom approach and problem-based learning. The COVID-19 pandemic presented certain challenges in the delivery of TBL in class. In this study, we investigated the impact of TBL on the academic performance of final year Biomedical Sciences' undergraduate students in the context of an "Endocrine Disorders" study block. We did so by comparing the classical in-person approach and online delivery due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A non-compulsory TBL session was introduced to the curriculum of this block, which followed the traditional 2-h lecture delivery. Comparative analysis was performed for the exam and coursework performance of students who attended the TBL sessions (online and in-person) and those that did not. RESULTS: Both cohorts of students who attended either in-person (n = 66) or online TBL sessions (n = 109) performed significantly better in their exams (p < 0.05) and a related coursework (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively) when compared to those that did not attend. For both these cohorts the exam mark distribution was much narrower compared to those that did not attend the TBL sessions where the majority of fails and "no shows" were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Online and in-person TBL, can successfully supplement traditional lecture-based teaching and enhance the learning/performance, for complex medical subjects/topics. Our findings demonstrate that it is possible to deliver these sessions online with demonstrable benefit for students suggesting that there is greater flexibility in the use of TBL in higher education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Measurement , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
3.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(2): 50-51, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662727
4.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1886649, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575951

ABSTRACT

Online classes have been provided for health-care pre-licensure learners during the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of online group work in interprofessional education. A total of 209 students were assigned to 50 groups (18 medical student groups, 13 nursing student groups, and 19 mixed medical/nursing student groups). Learners performed group work during the orientation for the course, which was hosted using an online video conferencing system. The learners first performed the activity individually (10 min) and then engaged in a group discussion to reach consensus on their answers (30 min). We calculated the scores before and after the group discussion and shared the results with the students. Scores were improved after the group discussion (mean ± SEM, 23.7 ± 0.9) compared with before (37.3 ± 1.3) (P < .0001). Lower scores after the group discussion, which indicated the effect of the group discussion on making better decisions, were observed most in the mixed medical/nursing student groups, followed by the nursing student and medical student groups. We noted only 3 groups in which the group discussion showed a negative effect on decision-making: all 3 of these groups were mixed (3 of 19 groups; 16%). These data demonstrated the power of group discussion for solving tasks when the participants' professional fields were mixed. However, the small size of the interdisciplinary groups might have resulted in less effective discussion, which might be due in part to psychological barriers arising from professional differences. Online group work is effective for facilitating discussion and building consensus about decisions in interprofessional education for medical and nursing students. Potential psychological barriers may exist in about 16% of mixed group students at the start, which should be kept in mind by instructors. Abbreviations: COVID-19: coronavirus disease 2019; IPE: Interprofessional Education; NASA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; SD: standard deviation; WHO: World Health Organization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Interdisciplinary Studies , Interprofessional Relations , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Education, Distance , Female , Group Processes , Humans , Learning , Male , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1899642, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574515

ABSTRACT

Background: During the current COVID-19 pandemic, offline clinical education was mandated to suspend at the neurology department of many teaching hospitals globally, yet there is insufficient evidence regarding the preferred practice and methods for online neurology intern training course.Objective: The investigation aimed to examine whether the online neurology training course based on Small Private Online Course (SPOC) and blending learning mode can achieve a good effect and cater for interns from different medical programs and whether the learning group size affects the teaching effect.Design: The subjects were 92 students enrolled in the neurology internship at the Second Xiangya Hospital of China from 9 March to 9 August 2020. After completing the online course, the final scores and evaluation results were compared among different groups of interns, and their preference to distinct contents of the course was analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS program (version 22.0).Results: Our online course received consistent positive recognition from the interns. Ninety-nine percent of the interns recommended incorporating the online course into the conventional offline training program after the pandemic. There was no significant difference between interns from different programs concerning the final scores and course evaluation. A smaller learning group size (<15 students) could achieve a better teaching effect than a larger group size (p < 0.05). The interns preferred interactive discussions, and course contents that they can get practice and feedback from, rather than video watching and didactic lectures.Conclusions: The online neurology intern training course based on SPOC and blending learning mode is worthy of popularization in a large student base. The teaching effect of an online intern training program may be improved by limiting the group size to less than 15 students and encouraging more interactive discussion, more practice and feedback.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , China/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Group Processes , Humans , Inservice Training , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ ; 50(1): 124-129, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1567964

ABSTRACT

The emergence of Corona Virus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had unprecedented effects on medical education worldwide. Sustaining student engagement in virtual learning is an arduous task. Team based learning (TBL) is a learner-centered approach that can facilitate better student engagement. Adapting TBL to online platform may address the challenges faced in virtual learning. This study was conducted to implement and evaluate online TBL among first year MBBS students in Biochemistry. After obtaining informed consent, three online TBL sessions were planned. The Individual Readiness Assessment Test, Group Readiness Assessment Test, and team application were assigned in Google classroom. The students used online platforms for their team interactions. After submitting their assignments, they joined online discussion with facilitator. Peer evaluation was done via Google forms. At the end of all the sessions, the students' perceptions on the process were collected using a structured anonymous feedback with open comments. Analysis of their feedback showed that the students found the process useful and it helped in fostering their team skills. Five major themes emerged on content analysis of the open comments; 'Enriched team skills', 'Gain in knowledge', 'Impact on attitude', 'Interaction during pandemic', and 'Emotional responses'. Students perceived that the online TBL is effective in improving their engagement, learning, and team skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Educational Measurement , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
7.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 51(4): 327-329, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561821
8.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(1): 1, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393530
9.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc4, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389118

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the ban on classroom teaching during the pandemic, the Munich "Anamnesegruppen" had to be switched to e-learning at short notice. There were no established concepts for this, which is why digitalization was piloted and evaluated for feasibility. Student "Anamnesegruppen": "Anamnesegruppen" have existed for over 50 years and are organized as independent student peer teaching. In small groups of medical and psychology students, interviews with patients are conducted once a week during the semester. This is followed by a feedback and discussion round, in which ethical and professional questions are discussed in addition to the patient's medical history. The goal is to train the participants' ability to communicate and reflect. Adaptation to digital methods: The anamnesis seminars have been moved to a virtual group room using video conference. Patients were mainly recruited from the participants' circle of acquaintances. The group size was set at eight people each in four groups and supervised by a pair of student tutors. Confidentiality and data protection declarations were obtained in writing. Results: By switching to digital anamnesis groups, all four groups were successfully completed. Both the final supervision of the tutors and the electronic evaluation of the participants yielded positive feedback. Compared to the two previous evaluations of the semesters in classroom sessions, there were no significant differences in the evaluation. Discussion: The continuously good evaluation results, which did not differ between the digital format and the classroom course of the previous semesters, show that an ad hoc conversion to digital teaching is possible. We want to stress the fact that elements reflecting the doctor-patient relationship were successfully preserved. For the similarly structured Balint groups, virtual sessions may also be considered. Further research, especially prospective, is desirable in order to better understand the possibilities of digital teaching in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Peer Group , Physician-Patient Relations , Teaching/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Communication , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Respir Med Res ; 79: 100828, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237866

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic. In absence of official recommendations, implementing daily multidisciplinary team (MDT) COVID-19 meetings was urgently needed. Our aim was to describe our initial institutional standard operating procedures for implementing these meetings, and their impact on daily practice. METHODS: All consecutive patients who were hospitalized in our institution due to COVID 19, from March 31 to April 15, 2020, were included. Criteria to be presented at MDT meetings were defined as a proven COVID-19 by PCR or strongly suspected on CT scan, requiring hospitalization and treatment not included in the standard of care. Three investigators identified the patients who met the predefined criteria and compared the treatment and outcomes of patients with predefined criteria that were presented during MDT meeting with those not presented during MDT meeting. COVID-19 MDT meeting implementation and adhesion were also assessed by a hospital medical staff survey. RESULTS: In all, 318 patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 were examined in our hospital. Of these, 230 (87%) were hospitalized in a COVID-19 unit, 91 (40%) of whom met predefined MDT meeting criteria. Fifty (55%) patients were presented at a MDT meeting versus 41 (45%) were not. Complementary exploration and inclusion in the CorImmuno cohort were higher in MDT meeting group (respectively 35 vs. 15%, P=0.03 and 80 versus 49%, P=0.0007). Prescription of hydrocortisone hemisuccinate was higher in group of patients not presented during MDT meeting (24 vs. 51%, P=0.007). Almost half of the patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were not presented at MDT meeting, which can be partly explained by technical software issues. CONCLUSIONS: Multidisciplinary COVID-19 meetings helped implementing a single standard of care, avoided using treatments that were untested or currently being tested, and facilitated the inclusion of patients in prospective cohorts and therapeutic trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Group Processes , Medical Staff, Hospital , Standard of Care , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , France , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
12.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(4): 530-541, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236066

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected everyone's work and daily life, and many employees are talking with their coworkers about this widespread pandemic on a regular basis. In this research, we examine how talking about crises such as COVID-19 at the team level affects team dynamics and behaviors. Drawing upon cultural tightness-looseness theory, we propose that talking about the COVID-19 crisis among team members is positively associated with team cultural tightness, which in turn benefits teams by decreasing team deviance but hurts teams by decreasing team creativity. Furthermore, we suggest that team virtuality moderates and weakens these indirect effects because face-to-face communication about COVID-19 is more powerful in influencing team cultural tightness than virtual communication. Results from a multisource, three-wave field study during the pandemic lend substantial support to these hypotheses. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings and directions for future research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Creativity , Employment/psychology , Group Processes , Organizational Culture , Adult , China , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Anat Sci Educ ; 14(4): 417-425, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191150

ABSTRACT

Anatomists are well placed to tackle the transition from face-to-face to blended learning approaches as a result of the rapidly forced changes brought about by Covid-19. The subject is extremely visual and has, therefore, previously been a target for the development of technology-enhanced learning initiatives over the last ten years. Today's students have come to expect the integration of technology in the classroom and remotely. They adjust quickly to the innovative use of new applications and software and have begun to integrate it within their own workflow for note taking and study aids. Given the intense drive toward blended deliveries of anatomy as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, it is easy to picture how the benefits of working in partnership with students (in order to achieve many of these aims) would be possible, particularly in difficult subjects like neuroanatomy. In doing so, it provides anatomists with new opportunities to engage students in a way that aligns well with best practice frameworks for engaging students through partnership. The current United Kingdom guidelines set out by Advance HE (a professional membership organization for promoting excellence in higher education) strongly encourages the higher education community to seek out appropriate academic contexts where a balance of power can be struck between staff and student to create a community of practice. If such an approach can be fully embraced by anatomists, a strong argument can be made for seizing the opportunity to optimize the benefits of student partnership work in this discipline.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Neuroanatomy/education , Students , COVID-19 , Group Processes , Humans
14.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(2): 117-130, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152954

ABSTRACT

With high levels of burnout, turnover, and secondary traumatic stress, the well-being of the behavioral health workforce was an area of concern prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. How the COVID-19 crisis has impacted social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other behavioral health professionals is unclear but should be examined. A brief survey evaluated the impact of the pandemic on the well-being of 168 behavioral health clinical and administrative staff serving in an urban behavioral health center in the United States. Staff experienced several personal and organizational-related challenges related to work-life balance, emotional distress, and organizational communication. Nevertheless, staff found an abundance of positive experiences when engaging with clients. Supportive, positive feedback and statements of appreciation from clients, colleagues, and supervisors helped staff to feel at their best. The well-being of behavioral health staff may be facilitated by consistent and supportive communication at the team, supervisory, and organizational levels and by involving staff in planning agency policy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Mental Health Centers/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Communication , Cooperative Behavior , Group Processes , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology , Work-Life Balance
15.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129786

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 was profoundly marked by the emergence and spread of SARS-CoV-2, causing COVID-19, which represents the greatest pandemic of the 21st century until now, and a major challenge for virologists in the scientific and medical communities. Increased numbers of SARS-CoV-2 infection all over the world imposed social and travel restrictions, including avoidance of face-to-face scientific meetings. Therefore, for the first time in history, the 2020 edition of the Brazilian Society of Virology (SBV) congress was totally online. Despite the challenge of the new format, the Brazilian society board and collaborators were successful in virtually congregating more than 921 attendees, which was the greatest SBV participant number ever reached. Seminal talks from prominent national and international researchers were presented every night, during a week, and included discussions about environmental, basic, animal, human, plant and invertebrate virology. A special roundtable debated exclusively new data and perspectives regarding COVID-19 by some of the greatest Brazilian virologists. Women scientists were very well represented in another special roundtable called "Young Women Inspiring Research", which was one of the most viewed and commented section during the meeting, given the extraordinary quality of the presented work. Finally, SBV offered the Helio Gelli Pereira award for one graduate and one undergraduate student, which has also been a fruitful collaboration between the society and Viruses journal. The annual SBV meeting has, therefore, reached its goals to inspire young scientists, stimulate high-quality scientific discussion and to encourage global collaboration between virologists.


Subject(s)
Virology , Brazil , Group Processes , Humans , Societies, Scientific , User-Computer Interface , Virology/organization & administration
16.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 8-29, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117682

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has wrought widespread devastation upon children and families across the United States, widening existing health disparities and inequities that disproportionately affect communities of color. In health care settings specifically, social work is the key workforce tasked with responding to patient and family psychosocial needs, both of which have increased substantially since the emergence of COVID-19. There is a need to understand ways in which hospital social workers' roles, responsibilities, and integration within interprofessional teams have evolved in response to these challenges. In this qualitative study, focus groups were conducted with 55 social workers employed across multiple settings in a large, urban, pediatric hospital in Spring 2020. Thematic analyses revealed salient superordinate themes related to the pandemic's impact on social work practice and social workers themselves, institutional facilitators and impediments to effective social work and interprofessional practice, and social work perspectives on future pandemic recovery efforts. Within each theme, a number of interrelated subthemes emerged elucidating nuances of telehealth adoption in the context of remote work, the salience of social determinants of health, and the critical role of social work in social justice oriented pandemic preparedness and response efforts. Implications for interprofessional practice and the profession at large are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Work/organization & administration , Social Workers/psychology , Focus Groups , Group Processes , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Professional Role , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , Social Work/standards , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
17.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(3): e1008726, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117464

ABSTRACT

We propose an analysis and applications of sample pooling to the epidemiologic monitoring of COVID-19. We first introduce a model of the RT-qPCR process used to test for the presence of virus in a sample and construct a statistical model for the viral load in a typical infected individual inspired by large-scale clinical datasets. We present an application of group testing for the prevention of epidemic outbreak in closed connected communities. We then propose a method for the measure of the prevalence in a population taking into account the increased number of false negatives associated with the group testing method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epidemiological Monitoring , Group Processes , Population Surveillance/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/virology , Datasets as Topic , Humans , Luxembourg/epidemiology , Prevalence , Sensitivity and Specificity
18.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc13, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110234

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive and aprupt changes in the training of health care professionals. Especially hands-on training can no longer take place in the usual form in everyday clinical practice. Rotations on the interprofessional training ward in Pediatrics (IPAPAED) at the University Medical Center Freiburg, had to be suspended starting March 2020. This report presents the interprofessional Covid-19 Replacement Program (I-reCovEr) as an alternative learning format for a rotation on the IPAPAED at the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. I-reCovEr offers opportunities for pediatric nursing trainees (n=6) and medical students (n=9) to learn together, taking hygienic and distancing measures into account. Based on a case study, selected learning aspects regarding interprofessional cooperation and communication are targeted. The participants report increased knowledge about the work of the other professional group in the evaluation using the Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS) -9A. In comparison to participants of the IPAPAED, however, the self-evaluation did not reveal any self-perceived acquisition of other interprofessional skills or competences. I-reCovEr can therefore serve as an introduction to interprofessional training, but it cannot replace interprofessional learning and working on an interprofessional training ward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Interprofessional Relations , Nurses, Pediatric/education , Pediatrics/education , Communication , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Immunol Methods ; 492: 112994, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099182

ABSTRACT

The annual meeting of the Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists (AMLI) was convened virtually over the month of August. Prior to the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, AMLI's scientific committee had chosen the following topics as the focus of its 2020 meeting: Histocompatibility Testing and Transplant Immunology; Secondary Immunodeficiency and Immunotherapy Monitoring; ANA Update; and Emerging Infectious Diseases and New Algorithms for Testing. Given the central role of the discipline in the evaluation of the host response to infection, it was apt to add a separate session on antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 infections to the original program. The current report provides an overview of the subjects discussed in the course of this meeting.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Societies, Medical , Algorithms , Animals , Group Processes , Histocompatibility Testing , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Laboratories , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Transplantation Immunology , Virtual Reality
20.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(1): 37-43, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066949

ABSTRACT

In the wake of COVID-19, the postgraduate activities in physiology were shifted from live (face-to-face teaching) to virtual mode. This transition posed a challenge to postgraduate students and faculty moderators, especially for participant-centric group discussion, wherein face-to-face interaction contributes significantly to active learner engagement. To bridge the gap between live group discussion (GD) and virtual GD in the conventional format (VGD), we implemented an innovative yet feasible multistep approach of conducting structured virtual group discussion (sVGD). It involved priming of students during the preparatory phase and incorporation of the Tuckman model of group dynamics, which consists of sequential substages of forming, storming, norming, and performing into the virtual format. Unsupervised synchronous and asynchronous, as well as supervised synchronous interactions within and in between the minigroups in a structured way, led to active engagement of students with one another and the moderator, despite the constraints imposed by the virtual format. After establishing the feasibility of the approach during the first GD (sVGD-1), sVGD-2 was conducted, further refining the approach, and feedback was obtained from the postgraduate students. Pre-GD feedback revealed that the live session was preferred over virtual for the conduct of GD, whereas both live GD and sVGD were perceived to be more effective than VGD in the post-GD feedback. Such pedagogical innovations may also help to address the challenges posed in traditional teaching across the undergraduate and postgraduate courses in medical education and beyond during such unforeseeable circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Graduate/organization & administration , Pandemics , Physiology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Virtual Reality , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Feasibility Studies , Feedback, Psychological , Group Processes , Humans , India , Internet , Students, Medical/psychology
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