Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0245182, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674002

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Working under pandemic conditions exposes health care workers (HCWs) to infection risk and psychological strain. A better understanding of HCWs' experiences of following local infection prevention and control (IPC) procedures during COVID-19 is urgently needed to inform strategies for protecting the psychical and psychological health of HCWs. The objective of this study was therefore to capture the perceptions of hospital HCWs on local IPC procedures and the impact on their emotional wellbeing during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe. METHODS: Participants were recruited in two sampling rounds of an international cross-sectional survey. Sampling took place between 31 March and 17 April 2020 via existing research networks and between 14 May and 31 August 2020 via online convenience sampling. Main outcome measures were behavioural determinants of HCWs' adherence to IPC guidelines and the WHO-5 Well-Being Index, a validated scale of 0-100 reflecting emotional wellbeing. The WHO-5 was interpreted as a score below or above 50 points, a cut-off score used in previous literature to screen for depression. RESULTS: 2289 HCWs from 40 countries in Europe participated. Mean age was 42 (±11) years, 66% were female, 47% and 39% were medical doctors and nurses, respectively. 74% (n = 1699) of HCWs were directly treating patients with COVID-19, of which 32% (n = 527) reported they were fearful of caring for these patients. HCWs reported high levels of concern about COVID-19 infection risk to themselves (71%) and their family (82%) as a result of their job. 40% of HCWs considered that getting infected with COVID-19 was not within their control. This feeling was more common among junior than senior HCWs (46% versus 38%, P value < .01). Sufficient COVID-19-specific IPC training, confidence in PPE use and institutional trust were positively associated with the feeling that becoming infected with COVID-19 was within their control. Female HCWs were more likely than males to report a WHO-5 score below 50 points (aOR 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.8). CONCLUSIONS: In Europe, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a differential impact on those providing direct COVID-19 patient care, junior staff and women. Health facilities must be aware of these differential impacts, build trust and provide tailored support for this vital workforce during the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Care/methods , Patient Care/standards
3.
J Clin Epidemiol ; 142: 10-18, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492240

ABSTRACT

AIM: The objectives of this scoping review are to identify the challenges to conducting evidence synthesis during the COVID-19 pandemic and to propose some recommendations addressing the identified gaps. METHODS: A scoping review methodology was followed to map the literature published on the challenges and solutions of conducting evidence synthesis using the Joanna Briggs Methodology of performing scoping review. We searched several databases from the start of the Pandemic in December 2019 until 10th June 2021. RESULTS: A total of 28 publications was included in the review. The challenges cited in the included studies have been categorised into four distinct but interconnected themes including: upstream, Evidence synthesis, downstream and contextual challenges. These challenges have been further refined into issues with primary studies, databases, team capacity, process, resources, and context. Several proposals to improve the above challenges included: transparency in primary studies registration and reporting, establishment of online platforms that enables collaboration, data sharing and searching, the use of computable evidence and coordination of efforts at an international level. CONCLUSION: This review has highlighted the importance of including artificial intelligence, a framework for international collaboration and a sustained funding model to address many of the shortcomings and ensure we are ready for similar challenges in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Research Report/standards , Databases, Bibliographic , Evidence-Based Practice , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Humans , Information Dissemination
4.
PLoS Med ; 18(10): e1003793, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The importance of infectious disease epidemic forecasting and prediction research is underscored by decades of communicable disease outbreaks, including COVID-19. Unlike other fields of medical research, such as clinical trials and systematic reviews, no reporting guidelines exist for reporting epidemic forecasting and prediction research despite their utility. We therefore developed the EPIFORGE checklist, a guideline for standardized reporting of epidemic forecasting research. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We developed this checklist using a best-practice process for development of reporting guidelines, involving a Delphi process and broad consultation with an international panel of infectious disease modelers and model end users. The objectives of these guidelines are to improve the consistency, reproducibility, comparability, and quality of epidemic forecasting reporting. The guidelines are not designed to advise scientists on how to perform epidemic forecasting and prediction research, but rather to serve as a standard for reporting critical methodological details of such studies. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines have been submitted to the EQUATOR network, in addition to hosting by other dedicated webpages to facilitate feedback and journal endorsement.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Checklist/standards , Epidemics , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Research Design , Biomedical Research/methods , Checklist/methods , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Epidemics/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting/methods , Humans , Reproducibility of Results
5.
Ginekol Pol ; 92(5): 387-391, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207898

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is an unusual phenomenon in the modern obstetric and midwifery history. Hospital staff from the isolation wards were trained in the safety and proper use of the hazardous materials suit and the proper managing of the biohazard materials. We were not expecting the situation, so we started to create more restrictions than facilities for mothers giving birth. In the context of infection risk for the fetus, scientists still search for vertical transmission evidence, but available data are ambiguous, and more research is needed. Concerning the infant safety and to minimalize the infection risk for medical teams, the first Polish guidelines published by the national consultants in obstetrics, midwifery, neonatology, and perinatology regarding the safest formula of birth were as the following: in the case of confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, the cesarean section for epidemic indications should be considered, except in an advanced or rapid labor. In the lately updated consensus (14th May), it was written that because the risk of vertical and intranatal SARS-CoV-2 transmission seemed to be low, the SARS-CoV-2 infection was not the main indication to perform cesarean section for any longer. Regardless of the birth formula, the newborns are separated from their mothers immediately after the labor in Polish obstetrician hospitals. The Polish Lactation Study Centre, consociating International Breastfeeding Certified Lactation Consultant, recommends feeding the newborn with its own mother's milk, even if she is infected with SARS-CoV-2 and isolated from her infant.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cesarean Section , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Humans , Infant , Poland/epidemiology , Postnatal Care/standards , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Marital Fam Ther ; 47(3): 551-565, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169822

ABSTRACT

As a response to the COVID-19 global crisis, many in the couple/marital and family therapy (CMFT) professional community quickly met the challenge of providing services to clients via telebehavioral health (TBH) services. As this public health emergency endures, family therapists must continue to engage in TBH practice professionally and ethically. The rapid adoption of TBH with minimal training and experience during this public health emergency can result in crises for both individual therapists as well as for the profession in implementing electronic record-keeping, conducting virtual sessions, and communicating online with various clinical populations. The risk of insufficient training and supervision create a challenge to new and experienced family therapists. This article summarizes the work done by the profession thus far to respond to this public health emergency and presents a roadmap of recommendations for navigating those challenges into the future and offers ideas about how to sustain quality TBH practice.


Subject(s)
Couples Therapy , Family Therapy , Guidelines as Topic , Health Personnel , Mental Health Services , Professional Practice , Telemedicine , Couples Therapy/organization & administration , Couples Therapy/standards , Family Therapy/organization & administration , Family Therapy/standards , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/standards , Professional Practice/organization & administration , Professional Practice/standards , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards
7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 254-261, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157419

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Guidelines from different regions on the use of non-invasive ventilation in COVID-19 have generally been inconsistent. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the quality and availability of guidelines, and whether non-invasive ventilation in the early stages of the pandemic is of importance. DESIGN AND METHOD: Databases, including PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library, as well as websites of international organizations and gray literature, were searched up to June 23, 2020. The reference lists of eligible papers were also hand-searched. RESULTS: A total of 26 guidelines met the inclusion criteria. According to the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, the guidelines' methodological quality was low. Among six domains, Rigour of Development and Editorial Independence were of the lowest quality. Given the lack of evidence from randomized clinical trials and the great variation between different regions, recommendations for non-invasive ventilation have generated considerable debate regarding the early stages of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Improving the methodological quality of the guidelines should be a goal with regard to future pandemics. Additionally, better-designed randomized clinical trials are needed to resolve contradictions regarding the impact of non-invasive ventilation. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020198410.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Noninvasive Ventilation , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Emerg Med ; 59(6): 964-974, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has contributed to an increase in intimate partner violence (IPV), posing challenges to health care providers who must protect themselves and others during sexual assault examinations. Victims of sexual assault encountered in prehospital and emergency department (ED) settings have legal as well as medical needs. A series of procedures must be carefully followed to facilitate forensic evidence collection and law enforcement investigation. A literature review detected a paucity of published guidance on the management of sexual assault patients in the ED, and no information specific to COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: Investigators sought to update the San Diego County sexual assault guidelines, created in collaboration with health care professionals, forensic specialists, and law enforcement, through a consensus iterative review process. An additional objective was to create a SAFET-I Tool for use by frontline providers during the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: The authors present a novel SAFET-I Tool that outlines the following five components of effective sexual assault patient care: stabilization, alert system activation, forensic evidence consideration, expedited post-assault treatment, and trauma-informed care. This framework can be used as an educational tool and template for agencies interested in developing or adapting existing sexual assault policies. CONCLUSIONS: There is a lack of clinical guidance for ED providers that integrates the many aspects of sexual assault patient care, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. A SAFET-I Tool is presented to assist emergency health care providers in the treatment and advocacy of sexual assault patients during a period with increasing rates of IPV.


Subject(s)
Forensic Medicine/methods , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Sex Offenses/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Forensic Medicine/standards , Forensic Medicine/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Examination/adverse effects , Physical Examination/methods , Physical Examination/psychology , Sex Offenses/trends
9.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 46(3): 100768, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987409

ABSTRACT

The exponential growth of commercial flights has resulted in an explosion of air travelers over the last few decades, including passengers with a wide range of cardiovascular conditions. Notwithstanding the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic that had set back the aviation industry for the next 1-2 years, air travel is expected to rebound fully by 2024. Guidelines and evidence-based recommendations for safe air travel in this group vary, and physicians often encounter situations where opinions and assessments on fitness for flights are sought. This article aims to provide an updated suite of recommendations for the aeromedical disposition of passenger with common cardiovascular conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathies, and common arrhythmias.


Subject(s)
Air Travel/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Comorbidity , Humans
10.
Pulmonology ; 27(5): 438-447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693888

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading worldwide, countries are dealing with different phases of the pandemic. Lately, scientific evidence has been growing about the measures for reopening respiratory outpatient services during the COVID-19 pandemic. We aim to summarize the key differences and similarities among recommendations by different national and international organizations. METHODS: We searched on Google and Pubmed for recently published National and International Recommendations/Guidelines/Position Papers from professional organizations and societies, offering a guidance to physicians on how to safely perform pulmonary function testing during COVID-19 pandemic. We also searched for spirometry manufacturers' operational indications. RESULTS: Indications on spirometry were released by the Chinese Task force, the American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand, the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française, the Spanish Societies (Sociedad Espanola de Neumologia y Cirugia Toracica, Sociedad Espanola de Alergologia e Inmunologia Clinica, Asociacion de Especialistas en Enfermeria del trabajo, Asociacion de Enfermeria Comunitaria), the Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia, the British Thoracic Society/Association for Respiratory Technology & Physiology, the Irish Thoracic Society, the Sociedad Uruguaya de Neumologia, the Italian Thoracic Society and the Italian Respiratory Society, Cleveland Clinic and Nebraska Medical Center. Detailed technical recommendations were found on manufacturers' websites. We found several similarities across available guidelines for safely resuming pulmonary function services, as well as differences in criteria for selecting eligible patients for which spirometry is deemed essential and advice which was not homogenous on room ventilation precautions. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a synthesis of national/international guidelines allowing practicing physicians to adapt and shape the way to organize their outpatient services locally. There is generally good agreement on the importance of limiting pulmonary function testing to selected cases only. However, significant differences concerning the subsets of candidate patients, as well as on the management of adequate room ventilation, were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Manufacturing Industry/organization & administration , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Spirometry/methods , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care Facilities/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Consensus , Disease Outbreaks , Equipment Design/standards , Equipment and Supplies Utilization/standards , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Manufacturing Industry/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Physicians , Respiratory Function Tests/standards , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Safety , Spirometry/standards
12.
Infection ; 48(2): 155-163, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221

ABSTRACT

There is a current worldwide outbreak of a new type of coronavirus (2019-nCoV), which originated from Wuhan in China and has now spread to 17 other countries. Governments are under increased pressure to stop the outbreak spiraling into a global health emergency. At this stage, preparedness, transparency, and sharing of information are crucial to risk assessments and beginning outbreak control activities. This information should include reports from outbreak sites and from laboratories supporting the investigation. This paper aggregates and consolidates the virology, epidemiology, clinical management strategies from both English and Chinese literature, official news channels, and other official government documents. In addition, by fitting the number of infections with a single-term exponential model, we report that the infection is spreading at an exponential rate, with a doubling period of 1.8 days.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Management , Guidelines as Topic/standards , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , World Health Organization
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL