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1.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221074470, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before the COVID-19 pandemic, Guinea has been the epicenter of the huge West Africa Ebola outbreak (2014-2016), that impact heavily the health system. Demographic information is one of the most basic data sources for health systems and services delivery, and yet can be very difficult to obtain with any accuracy. The objectives were to contribute among other to: (i) a determination of the catchment area (health coverage area and responsibility) of the Kirikilan health facility (PCM); (ii) geocoded mapping to find out exactly where these populations per sector of Kirikilan neighborhood lives; (iii) an approach for regular and systematic annual demographic follow up of target populations. METHODS: The study was a 3-year community-based survey with annual follow up of the population within the quartier of Kirikilan in Dubreka Prefecture in Guinea. It was an exhaustive enumeration of the population, sector by sector of the quartier, then there was no sampling size neither estimation. RESULTS: In October 2017 as a baseline of the study, the enumeration showed the total population was 8824 persons, 936 compounds, 1435 households, and the breakdown by sub quartier (sector) has been performed. It's showed the interest of the mapping of the target populations with geo-referenced localization. The annual follow up by demographic enumerus showed a dramatic increase of the size of the population, including strong migration of the evicted population due to urbanization purpose in some districts of Conakry, the capital. CONCLUSION: The study showed the importance of the enumeration and follow up of the target populations, but also of the setting up community data based to improve the district health information system (DHIS 2) in Guinea. The approach has a best practice could be an importunity to improve data sharing, mapping, health quality access, and affordability for a sustainable health toward universal health coverage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Disease Outbreaks , Guinea/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
2.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(5)2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854324

ABSTRACT

In 2017, the national agency for health security (L'Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire-ANSS) in Guinea implemented the District Health Information Software (DHIS2) as the Ministry of Health national surveillance system to capture and report aggregate disease data. During 2019, the ANSS started using DHIS2 Tracker to collect case-based (individual-level) data for epidemic-prone diseases. In 2020, the capability was expanded, and it was used during the COVID-19 pandemic to capture data relevant to the COVID-19 response. When an Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak was announced in February 2021, the Tracker module was updated, and enhanced functionalities were developed to meet the needs for the emerging epidemic. This novel EVD module has components to capture information on cases, contacts, alerts, laboratory and vaccinations and provides a centralised site for all EVD outbreak data. It has since been expanded for use with future viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Guinea/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Software
3.
Glob Health Sci Pract ; 10(1)2022 02 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744624

ABSTRACT

Lack of trust in the health care system can serve as a barrier to service utilization, especially in pandemic and postemergency settings. Although previous research has identified domains of trust that contribute to individuals' trust in the health system, little research exists from low- and middle-income countries, particularly during and after infectious disease outbreaks. The current study-conducted to inform activities for a post-Ebola program-explored perceptions and experiences of health care provision in post-Ebola Guinea, with particular attention to trust. Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with health workers (n=15) and mothers of young children (n=29) along with 12 focus group discussions with grandmothers of young children and 12 with male heads of household. The study occurred in Basse Guinée and Guinée Forestière-2 areas hardest hit by Ebola. Respondents identified a breach of trust during the epidemic, with several domains emerging as relevant for renewed trust and care-seeking practices. At the core of a trusting client-provider relationship was the inherent belief that providers had an intrinsic duty to treat clients well. From there, perceived provider competence, the hospitality at the facility, provider empathy, transparency about costs, and commitment to confidentiality emerged as relevant influences on participant trust in providers. Community members and providers expressed similar viewpoints regarding trust and discussed the role of open communication and community mobilization in rebuilding trust. Study findings informed a variety of program activities, including the development of campaign messages and interpersonal communication trainings for health workers. This study provides valuable insight about some underlying components of trust that can provide key leverage points to rebuild trust and promote care seeking in postemergency settings. This insight is informing program activities in the current Ebola response in Guinea and could be useful in other crises, such as the global coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Child , Child, Preschool , Guinea/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/therapy , Humans , Male , Qualitative Research , Trust
4.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(12): e0009904, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724768

ABSTRACT

Since its early spread in early 2020, the disease caused by the novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused mass disruptions to health services. These have included interruptions to programs that aimed to prevent, control, and eliminate neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) released interim guidelines recommending the temporary cessation of mass drug administration (MDA), community-based surveys, and case detection, while encouraging continuation of morbidity management and vector control where possible. Over the course of the following months, national programs and implementing partners contributed to COVID-19 response efforts, while also beginning to plan for resumption of NTD control activities. To understand the challenges, opportunities, and recommendations for maximizing continuity of disease control during public health emergencies, we sought perspectives from Nigeria and Guinea on the process of restarting NTD control efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through semistructured interviews with individuals involved with NTD control at the local and national levels, we identified key themes and common perspectives between the 2 countries, as well as observations that were specific to each. Overall, interviewees stressed the challenges posed by COVID-19 interruptions, particularly with respect to delays to activities and related knock-on impacts, such as drug expiry and prolonged elimination timelines, as well as concerns related to funding. However, respondents in both countries also highlighted the benefits of a formal risk assessment approach, particularly in terms of encouraging information sharing and increasing coordination and advocacy. Recommendations included ensuring greater availability of historical data to allow better monitoring of how future emergencies affect NTD control progress; continuing to use risk assessment approaches in the future; and identifying mechanisms for sharing lessons learned and innovations between countries as a means of advancing postpandemic health systems and disease control capacity strengthening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Neglected Diseases/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/economics , Government Programs/economics , Government Programs/organization & administration , Guinea , Humans , Mass Drug Administration , Nigeria , SARS-CoV-2 , Tropical Medicine/methods
5.
Arch Virol ; 167(2): 583-589, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653517

ABSTRACT

We detected SARS-CoV-2 of PANGO lineage R.1 with the spike substitution E484K in three patients. Eleven other sequences in France and 8,831 worldwide were available from GISAID, 92% originating from Japan. The three genome sequences from our institute were phylogenetically closest to another from Guinea-Conakry, where one of the patients had travelled. These viruses did not exhibit any unusual features in cell culture. Spike structural predictions indicated a 1.3-time higher transmissibility index than for the globally spread B.1.1.7 variant but also an affinity loss for gangliosides that might have slowed dissemination. The spread of new SARS-CoV-2 mutants/variants is still not well understood and therefore difficult to predict, and this hinders implementation of effective preventive measures, including adapted vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Guinea , Humans , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
7.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(2): 457-460, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574432

ABSTRACT

This overview of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 circulation over 1.5 years in Guinea demonstrates that virus clades and variants of interest and concern were progressively introduced, mostly by travellers through Conakry, before spreading through the country. Sequencing is key to following virus evolution and establishing efficient control strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Guinea/epidemiology , Humans
8.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(9): e0009807, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440983

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guinea reported its first case of COVID-19 on March 12, 2020. Soon thereafter, a national state of emergency was declared, all land borders were closed, schools were shut down, and public gatherings were limited. Many health activities, including field-based activities targeting neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), were paused. The World Health Organization (WHO) issued updated guidance on the resumption of NTD field-based activities on July 27, 2020. In response, the Guinea Ministry of Health (MoH) and its partners planned and resumed mass drug administration (MDA) in mid-August to September 2020 in 19 health districts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A risk-benefit assessment was conducted to identify potential risks associated with the MDA in the COVID-19 context. Following this assessment, a risk mitigation plan with barrier measures was developed to guide MDA implementation. These measures included COVID-19 testing for all national staff leaving Conakry, mask wearing, social distancing of two meters, and hand washing/sanitizing. A checklist was developed and used to monitor compliance to risk mitigation measures. Data on adherence to risk mitigation measures were collected electronically during the MDA. A total of 120 checklists, representing 120 community drug distributor (CDD) teams (two CDDs per team) and 120 households, were completed. Results indicated that washing or disinfecting hands was practiced by 68.3% of CDD teams, compared to 45.0% among households. Face masks to cover the mouth and nose were worn by 79.2% of CDD teams, while this was low among households (23.3%). In 87.5% of households, participants did not touch the dose pole and in 88.3% of CDD teams, CDDs did not touch the hands of the participants while giving the drugs. A large majority of CDD teams (94.2%) and household members (94.2%) were willing to participate in the MDA despite the pandemic. The epidemiological coverage was ≥65% for lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and soil-transmitted helminths in 10 out of 19 HDs and ≥75% for schistosomiasis for school-aged children in 7 out of 11 HDs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Guinea was one of the first countries in Africa to resume MDA activities during the COVID-19 pandemic without causing an observed increase of transmission. The development of a risk mitigation plan and a method to monitor adherence to barrier measures was critical to this unprecedented effort. The rapid incorporation of COVID-19 barrier measures and their acceptance by CDDs and household members demonstrated both the adaptability of the National NTD Program to respond to emerging issues and the commitment of the MoH to implement NTD programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elephantiasis, Filarial/drug therapy , Mass Drug Administration , Onchocerciasis/drug therapy , Schistosomiasis/drug therapy , Antiparasitic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Elephantiasis, Filarial/epidemiology , Elephantiasis, Filarial/prevention & control , Government Programs , Guideline Adherence , Guinea , Humans , Neglected Diseases , Onchocerciasis/epidemiology , Onchocerciasis/prevention & control , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Schistosomiasis/epidemiology , Schistosomiasis/prevention & control , Soil/parasitology
10.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1490, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In early March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic hit West Africa. In response, countries in the region quickly set up crisis management committees and implemented drastic measures to stem the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The objective of this article is to analyse the epidemiological evolution of COVID-19 in seven Francophone West African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Senegal) as well as the public health measures decided upon during the first 7 months of the pandemic. METHODS: Our method is based on quantitative and qualitative data from the pooling of information from a COVID-19 data platform and collected by a network of interdisciplinary collaborators present in the seven countries. Descriptive and spatial analyses of quantitative epidemiological data, as well as content analyses of qualitative data on public measures and management committees were performed. RESULTS: Attack rates (October 2020) for COVID-19 have ranged from 20 per 100,000 inhabitants (Benin) to more than 94 per 100,000 inhabitants (Senegal). All these countries reacted quickly to the crisis, in some cases before the first reported infection, and implemented public measures in a relatively homogeneous manner. None of the countries implemented country-wide lockdowns, but some implemented partial or local containment measures. At the end of June 2020, countries began to lift certain restrictive measures, sometimes under pressure from the general population or from certain economic sectors. CONCLUSION: Much research on COVID-19 remains to be conducted in West Africa to better understand the dynamics of the pandemic, and to further examine the state responses to ensure their appropriateness and adaptation to the national contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Africa, Western/epidemiology , Benin , Burkina Faso , Communicable Disease Control , Cote d'Ivoire , Guinea , Humans , Mali/epidemiology , Niger , SARS-CoV-2 , Senegal/epidemiology
12.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(6): 1966-1969, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278627

ABSTRACT

In February 2021, a new Ebola outbreak occurred amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Republic of Guinea. Technical committees and Ebola mitigation mechanisms used during the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemics, have been redeployed by the public health organizations and African health organizations. As the burden on the local healthcare system is rising, fears of socioeconomic disruption are growing as well. Strategies used during the previous epidemic need to be reactivated, and new measures taken during the challenges of COVID-19 are being considered. This perspective discusses the available evidence regarding the epidemic of Ebola in Guinea amid the COVID-19 pandemic, highlights the challenges to be prioritized, and provides evidence-based recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Delivery of Health Care , Guinea/epidemiology , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
13.
Malar J ; 20(1): 272, 2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277944

ABSTRACT

Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Guinea. The entire country is considered at risk of the disease. Transmission occurs all year round with peaks occurring from July through October with Plasmodium falciparum as the primary parasite species. Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug against uncomplicated P. falciparum in Guinea until 2005, prior to the adoption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). In this review, data on therapeutic efficacy of CQ and artemisinin-based combinations reported in published literature is summarized. Against CQ, a failure rate of 27% (12/44) was reported in a study in 1992; a median failure rate of 15.6% [range: 7.7-28.3; 8 studies] was observed during 1996-2001, and 81% (17/21) of the patients failed to clear parasitaemia in a study conducted in 2007. For artemisinin-based combinations, three published studies were identified (1495 patients; 2004-2016); all three studies demonstrated day 28 polymerase chain reaction corrected efficacy > 95%. One study characterized kelch-13 mutations (389 tested; samples collected in 2016) with no evidence of mutations currently known to be associated with artemisinin resistance. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and widespread usage of counterfeit medicines are immediate challenges to malaria control activities in Guinea.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Malaria, Falciparum/drug therapy , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Antimalarials/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Guinea/epidemiology , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/complications , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 205, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209790

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the objective was to identify the predictive factors contributing to COVID-related deaths in Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: this was a 4-month (12th March to 12th July 2020) cross sectional study carried out in the intensive care unit of the COVID treatment center of Donka National Hospital, the only hospital with a COVID intensive care unit in Guinea. RESULTS: during our period of study 140 patients were hospitalized in the COVID intensive care unit and 35 patients died (25%). In univariate analysis, the occurrence of death was associated with: confusional syndrome (p<0.001), time to admission (p<0.001), use of an inotropic or vasopressor (p<0.001), Brescia score ≥ 2 (p=0.004), non-invasive ventilation (p=0.011), stroke (p=0.014), Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) (p=0.015), male (p=0.021), provenance (p=0.021), acute renal failure (p=0.022), pulmonary embolism (p=0.022), invasive ventilation (p=0.022), and age > 60 years (p=0.047). In multivariate analysis, the factors predictive of mortality were: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) (OR= 6.33, 95% CI [1.66-29]; p=0.007), a Brescia score ≥ 2 (OR =5.8, 95% CI [1.7-19.2]; p=0.004) and admission delay (OR =5.6, 95% CI [1.8-17.5]; p=0.003). CONCLUSION: our study shows that the acute respiratory distress syndrome, then the Brescia score ≥ 2, and finally the time to admission to intensive care were all associated with an increased risk of death for patients. These results are different from those reported in Asia, Europe and North America.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Intensive Care Units , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guinea , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors
15.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(Suppl 2)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203974

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Experiences of care and satisfaction are intrinsically linked, as user's experiences of care may directly impact satisfaction, or indirectly impact user's expectations and values. Both experiences of care and satisfaction are important to measure so that quality can be monitored and improved. Globally, women experience mistreatment during childbirth at facilities; however, there is limited evidence exploring the mistreatment and women's satisfaction with care during childbirth. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey within the WHO study 'How women are treated during facility-based childbirth' exploring the mistreatment of women during childbirth in Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar and Nigeria. Women's experiences of mistreatment and satisfaction with care during childbirth was explored. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was conducted to evaluate the association between mistreatment, women's overall satisfaction with the care they received, and whether they would recommend the facility to others. RESULTS: 2672 women were included in this analysis. Despite over one-third of women reporting experience of mistreatment (35.4%), overall satisfaction for services received and recommendation of the facility to others was high, 88.4% and 90%, respectively. Women who reported experiences of mistreatment were more likely to report lower satisfaction with care: women were more likely to be satisfied if they did not experience verbal abuse (adjusted OR (AOR) 4.52, 95% CI 3.50 to 5.85), or had short waiting times (AOR 5.12, 95% CI 3.94 to 6.65). Women who did not experience any physical or verbal abuse or discrimination were more likely to recommend the facility to others (AOR 3.89, 95% CI 2.98 to 5.06). CONCLUSION: Measuring both women's experiences and their satisfaction with care are critical to assess quality and provide actionable evidence for quality improvement. These measures can enable health systems to identify and respond to root causes contributing to measures of satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parturition/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Women/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , Child , Community-Based Participatory Research , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery, Obstetric , Female , Ghana , Guinea , Humans , Male , Maternal Health , Myanmar , Nigeria , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) ; 70(2): 102-105, 2021 Apr.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131068

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) is the main global health crisis of our time and the greatest threat we have faced in this century. According to the National Health Security Agency (ANSS), which is the national body responsible for managing epidemics and pandemics, 1927 cases of COVID-19 were confirmed, 11 deaths with more than 4000 contact subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the activities of the cardiology department of the Ignace Deen National Hospital at the Conakry University Hospital. This was a descriptive retrospective study from January 2020 to April 2020, focusing on consultation and hospitalisation activities in the cardiology department of Ignace Deen National Hospital at Conakry University Hospital. The study consisted of assessing the impact of the pandemic on patient use of the service during the first weeks of the pandemic. We recorded the frequency of consultations and hospitalisations from March to April 2020, which we compared to the frequency of consultations and hospitalisations in January and February 2020. During this study from March to April 2020, we identified 130 patients in consultation against 450 patients for the two months preceding the official declaration of the pandemic in Guinea, a drop of 71.1% (320 patients). The same remark was made in hospitalisation with a drop of 75% (35 patients against 140 for the two months preceding the pandemic). At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Guinea, it is clear that there has been a rapid and significant drop in the effective use of the cardiology service.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/organization & administration , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Guinea , Humans , Retrospective Studies
18.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 133, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106479

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the aim of this work is to evaluate the contribution of thoracic computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of COVID-19 in Guinea. METHODS: this was a retrospective study with data recorded over a 2 Month period. Records of patients who tested positive on chest CT without contrast injection on admission were included in this study. Not included are those who did or did not perform a chest CT scan after confirmation of the diagnosis by RT-PCR. The data were collected under the direction of the National Health Security Agency (ANSS) and analysed using STATA/SE version 11.2 software. RESULTS: all patients tested performed a chest CT scan without contrast injection while awaiting the RT-PCR test result. Eighty percent (80%) of patients had lesions characteristic of COVID-19 viral pneumonia on chest CT. The reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) test was later positive in 33 patients (94.28%) and negative in 2 (5.71%). CONCLUSION: it is noted from this study that chest computed tomography is a critical tool in the rapid diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. Its systematization in all patients suspected in our dispute, would facilitate diagnosis while waiting for confirmation by RT-PCR and would limit the loss of cases.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Guinea/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Smoking/epidemiology
19.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37(Suppl 1): 42, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069975

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the main clinical and evolutionary features of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children aged 0-18 years who were suspected and diagnosed for COVID-19 during routine consultations in the pediatric ward of the Ignace Deen National Hospital in Conakry. This retrospective study targeted all children admitted to the Pediatrics Department during the study period and focused on children whose clinical examination and/or history indicated a suspicion of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Only children with a positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test were included. Clinical and paraclinical data were rigorously analyzed. Anonymity and respect for ethical rules were the norm. Medical records were used as the data source and a questionnaire was developed for collection. The analysis was done using STATA/SE version 11.2 software. The mean age of the patients observed was 9.66±1.32 years, with a sex ratio of 1.25. The history of the patients found that 36.11 had already been in contact with a COVID-19 positive subject, of which 8 or 22 had close relatives treated for COVID-19 and 5 had been with classmates treated for COVID-19. Fever and physical asthenia, runny nose and throat pain were respectively found in 58.33%, 50% and 30.55% of patients with irritability in 25%. Asymptomatic children were 30.55%. The diagnosis was confirmed after a positive RT-PCR test. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan was normal in 80.55% of the children. They were given mostly azithromycin 15mg/kg, zinc and chloroquine sulfate 5mg/kg. The mean age of the patients observed was 9.66 years, with a sex ratio of 1.25. The history of the patients found that 36.11 had already been in contact with a COVID-19 positive subject, of which 8 or 22 had close relatives treated for COVID-19 and 5 had been with classmates treated for COVID-19. Fever and physical asthenia, runny nose and throat pain were respectively found in 58.33%, 50% and 30.55% of patients with irritability in 25%. Asymptomatic children were 30.55%. The diagnosis was confirmed after a positive RT-PCR test. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan was normal in 80.55% of the children. They were given mostly azithromycin 15mg/kg, zinc and chloroquine sulfate 5mg/kg.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Adolescent , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Female , Guinea , Humans , Infant , Male , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Zinc/administration & dosage
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 363, 2020.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041372

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, which is genetically similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus. In pediatrics, it has a benign clinical course. Since the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic in Guinea, whose epicenter was Conakry, pediatric cases have been reported at the CTEIP in Donka. The purpose of this study was to determine their epidemiological profile. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of children aged 0-16 years admitted to the CTEIP, Donka, over a period of four months. Out of 7308 patients, coming predominantly from 5 communes of Conakry and hospitalized in the CTEPI, 189 were aged between 0 and 16 years (2 .59%). The majority of patients were within the age-group 0-4-years (38.62%) with a sex-ratio (F/M) of 1.52; 62.96% were students, 70% of children lived in Conakry, 28.57% of mothers were traders and contact persons (39.68%); 37.57% of fathers were civil servants, 2.65% of children had a history of sickle cell disease and 1.59% had allergic rhinitis. Asymptomatic patients accounted for 52.38% of cases and diagnosed patients were 74.6%. Symptoms included fever, rhinorrhea, headache, cough, abdominal pain, sneezing, diarrhea, physical asthenia. The incidence of COVID-19 among children hospitalized in the CTEIP of Donka is low. Children aged 5 years and older are more affected and nearly 50% are asymptomatic. Common symptoms are fever, headache, rhinorrhea, cough, abdominal pain, sneezing, diarrhea, physical asthenia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Age Factors , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guinea/epidemiology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male
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