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1.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(11): 1951-1952, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397500

ABSTRACT

An abundance of literature has demonstrated that coronavirus disease (COVID-19) contributes to a hypercoagulable state that is associated with venous thromboembolic events. Data on postoperative complications after a mild COVID-19 infection are limited. We report a case of ovarian vein thrombosis after pelvic surgery in a patient with a recent mild COVID-19 infection. The patient presented with complaints of fever and worsening right-sided abdominal pain postoperatively and was found to have a right ovarian vein thrombosis. Thrombophilia workup was negative. The hypercoagulable state of patients with COVID-19 may have implications on postoperative complications after gynecologic surgery even in cases of mild infection. Further research is needed to determine the optimal thromboembolic prophylaxis for patients undergoing pelvic surgery after a COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
2.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 29(2): 274-283.e1, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370604

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of perioperative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in women undergoing benign gynecologic surgery and to evaluate perioperative complication rates in patients with active, previous, or no previous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. DESIGN: A multicenter prospective cohort study. SETTING: Ten institutions in the United States. PATIENTS: Patients aged >18 years who underwent benign gynecologic surgery from July 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020, were included. All patients were followed up from the time of surgery to 10 weeks postoperatively. Those with intrauterine pregnancy or known gynecologic malignancy were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: Benign gynecologic surgery. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary outcome was the incidence of perioperative COVID-19 infections, which was stratified as (1) previous COVID-19 infection, (2) preoperative COVID-19 infection, and (3) postoperative COVID-19 infection. Secondary outcomes included adverse events and mortality after surgery and predictors for postoperative COVID-19 infection. If surgery was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the reason for postponement and any subsequent adverse event was recorded. Of 3423 patients included for final analysis, 189 (5.5%) postponed their gynecologic surgery during the pandemic. Forty-three patients (1.3% of total cases) had a history of COVID-19. The majority (182, 96.3%) had no sequelae attributed to surgical postponement. After hospital discharge to 10 weeks postoperatively, 39 patients (1.1%) became infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The mean duration of time between hospital discharge and the follow-up positive COVID-19 test was 22.1 ± 12.3 days (range, 4-50 days). Eleven (31.4% of postoperative COVID-19 infections, 0.3% of total cases) of the newly diagnosed COVID-19 infections occurred within 14 days of hospital discharge. On multivariable logistic regression, living in the Southwest (adjusted odds ratio, 6.8) and single-unit increase in age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (adjusted odds ratio, 1.2) increased the odds of postoperative COVID-19 infection. Perioperative complications were not significantly higher in patients with a history of positive COVID-19 than those without a history of COVID-19, although the mean duration of time between previous COVID-19 diagnosis and surgery was 97 days (14 weeks). CONCLUSION: In this large multicenter prospective cohort study of benign gynecologic surgeries, only 1.1% of patients developed a postoperative COVID-19 infection, with 0.3% of infection in the immediate 14 days after surgery. The incidence of postoperative complications was not different in those with and without previous COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
3.
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol ; 73: 40-55, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195258

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-Cov-2 has changed healthcare on a worldwide scale. This highly contagious respiratory virus has overwhelmed healthcare systems. Many staff were redeployed, and there was widespread cessation of non-urgent outpatient clinics and surgery. Outpatient clinics and theatre areas were converted to COVID-19 wards and intensive care units. Following the first peak, services began to recommence with new triaging and prioritisation guidance to safeguard patients and staff. Different countries and healthcare systems produced differing guidance and, in particular, variation in the best approach to continuing acute and elective surgical procedures. This chapter collates and evaluates the increasing international literature concerning the surgical management of gynaecological conditions during the pandemic, such that clear inferences, recommendations and guidance can be generated to aid clinical practice and safeguard against further major disruption arising from further COVID-19 peaks. The available data are assessed within the context of the current phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control , SARS-CoV-2 , Women's Health
4.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(3): 481-489, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988421

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This review formulates the rationale for using enhanced recovery protocols (ERPs) to standardize and optimize perioperative care during this high-risk time to minimize poor outcomes owing to provider, patient, and system vulnerabilities. DATA SOURCES: n/a METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: A literature review using key Medical Subject Headings terms was performed-according to methods described by the Cochrane Collaboration and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines-on studies that described enhanced recovery and coronavirus disease (COVID-19). TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Modifications to our existing ERPs related to the COVID-19 pandemic should include new accommodations for patient education, preoperative COVID-19 testing, prehabilitation, and intraoperative infection as well as thromboembolism risk reduction. CONCLUSION: ERPs are evidence-based, best practice guidelines applied across the perioperative continuum to mitigate surgical stress, decrease complications, and accelerate recovery. These benefits are part of the high-value-care equation needed to solve the clinical, operational, and financial challenges of the current COVID-19 pandemic. The factors driving outcomes on ERPs, such as the provision of minimally invasive surgery, warrant careful consideration. Tracking patient outcomes and improving care in response to outcomes data are key to the success of clinical care protocols such as ERPs. Numerous emerging clinical registries and reporting systems have been activated to provide outcomes data on the impact of COVID-19. This will inform and change surgical practice as well as provide opportunity to learn if the advantages that surgeons, patients, and the healthcare system might gain from using ERPs during a pandemic are meaningful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Infection Control , Organizational Innovation , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol ; 48(5): 444-447, 2020 05.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-832614

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Recommendations for the management of patients with gynecological cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic period. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Recommendations based on the consensus conference model. RESULTS: In the case of a COVID-19 positive patient, surgical management should be postponed for at least 15 days. For cervical cancer, the place of surgery must be re-evaluated in relation to radiotherapy and Radio-Chemotherapy-Concomitant and the value of lymph node staging surgeries must be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. For advanced ovarian cancers, neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be favored even if primary cytoreduction surgery could be envisaged. It is lawful not to offer hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy during a COVID-19 pandemic. In the case of patients who must undergo interval surgery, it is possible to continue the chemotherapy and to offer surgery after 6 cycles of chemotherapy. For early stage endometrial cancer, in case of low and intermediate preoperative ESMO risk, hysterectomy with bilateral annexectomy associated with a sentinel lymph node procedure should be favored. It is possible to consider postponing surgery for 1 to 2 months in low-risk endometrial cancers (FIGO Ia stage on MRI and grade 1-2 endometrioid cancer on endometrial biopsy). For high ESMO risk, it ispossible to favor the MSKCC algorithm (combining PET-CT and sentinel lymph node biopsy) in order to omit pelvic and lumbar-aortic lymphadenectomies. CONCLUSION: During COVID-19 pandemic, patients suffering from cancer should not lose life chance, while limiting the risks associated with the virus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cytoreduction Surgical Procedures , Female , France , Genital Neoplasms, Female/complications , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
6.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 253: 133-140, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733869

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has raised some important interrogations on minimally invasive gynaecological surgery. The International Society for Gynecologic Endoscopy (ISGE) has taken upon itself the task of providing guidance and best practice policies for all practicing gynaecological endoscopists. Factors affecting decision making processes in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) vary depending on factors such as the phase of the pandemic, policies on control and prevention, expertise and existing infrastructure. Our responsibility remains ensuring the safety of all health care providers, ancillary staff and patients during this unusual period. We reviewed the current literature related to gynecological and endoscopic surgery during the Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) crisis. Regarding elective surgery, universal testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection should be carried out wherever possible 40 h prior to surgery. In case of confirmed positive case of SARS-CoV-2, surgery should be delayed. Priority should be given to relatively urgent cases such as malignancies. ISGE supports medical optimization and delaying surgery for benign non-life-threatening surgeries. When possible, we recommend to perform cases by laparoscopy and to allow early discharges. Any procedure with risk of bowel involvement should be performed by open surgery as studies have found a high amount of viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) in stool. Regarding urgent surgery, each unit should create a risk assessment flow chart based on capacity. Patients should be screened for symptoms and symptomatic patients must be tested. In the event that a confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 is found, every attempt should be made to optimize medical management and defer surgery until the patient has recovered and only emergency or life-threatening surgery should be performed in these cases. We recommend to avoid intubation and ventilation in SARS-CoV-2 positive patients and if at all possible local or regional anesthesia should be utilized. Patients who screen or test negative may have general anesthesia and laparoscopic surgery while strict protocols of infection control are upheld. Surgery in screen-positive as well as SARS-CoV-2 positive patients that cannot be safely postponed should be undertaken with full PPE with ensuring that only essential personnel are exposed. If available, negative pressure theatres should be used for patients who are positive or screen high risk. During open and vaginal procedures, suction can be used to minimize droplet and bioaerosol spread. In a patient who screens low risk or tests negative, although carrier and false negatives cannot be excluded, laparoscopy should be strongly considered. We recommend, during minimal access surgeries, to use strategies to reduce production of bioaerosols (such as minimal use of energy, experienced surgeon), to reduce leakage of smoke aerosols (for example, minimizing the number of ports used and size of incisions, as well as reducing the operating pressures) and to promote safe elimination of smoke during surgery and during the ports' closure (such as using gas filters and smoke evacuation systems). During the post-peak period of pandemic, debriefing and mental health screening for staff is recommended. Psychological support should be provided as needed. In conclusion, based on the existent evidence, ISGE largely supports the current international trends favoring laparoscopy over laparotomy on a case by case risk evaluation basis, recognizing the different levels of skill and access to minimally invasive procedures across various countries.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endoscopy/standards , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
7.
J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod ; 49(7): 101813, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic gynaecological surgery is commonly performed under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. In general surgery, locoregional anaesthesia was applied to laparoscopic procedures, increasing minimally invasive surgery advantages. AIMS: To assess and compare postoperative pain after laparoscopic adnexal procedures for benign conditions under spinal anaesthesia (SA) versus general anaesthesia (GA). Furthermore, anaesthesiologic, surgical and clinical data were evaluated in both groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study performed in a tertiary level referral centre for minimally invasive gynaecological surgery (Gynaecology and Human Reproduction Physiopathology, University of Bologna). Women scheduled for adnexal laparoscopic surgery for benign conditions between February and May 2019 were assigned to receive either SA or GA with endotracheal intubation. A sample size of 13 women per group was needed to detect a 2-point difference in pain scores. MAIN FINDINGS: 13 women were enrolled in the SA arm, 15 in the GA arm. In the SA cohort, the most common intraoperative adverse event was shoulder pain, reported by 3/12 women. At 1, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after surgery pain was significantly lower in the SA arm (p < .05). Patients submitted to SA experienced no need for opioid drugs administration, unlike those receiving GA. Patients' mobilization and return of bowel function were noted significantly earlier in the SA group (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: SA is a feasible, safe and effective anaesthesiologic technique for laparoscopic gynaecological procedures for benign conditions, allowing a better control of postoperative pain. Women undergoing SA achieve earlier mobilization and bowel canalization. During the Covid-19 pandemics, SA could be useful in reducing the need for invasive procedures on respiratory tract.


Subject(s)
Adnexal Diseases/surgery , Anesthesia, General/methods , Anesthesia, Spinal/methods , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Laparoscopy/methods , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Adnexa Uteri/surgery , Adult , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Prospective Studies , Sample Size
8.
Oncologist ; 25(6): e982-e985, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-38316

ABSTRACT

From a large medical center in Wuhan, the epicenter of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), we report clinical features and prognosis for three women diagnosed with COVID-19 after gynecologic oncology surgery and hospitalized in January 2020. The incidence of COVID-19 was 0.77% (3 of 389) of total hospitalizations and 1.59% (3 of 189) of patients undergoing surgeries in the ward. The infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may be related to the older age, comorbidities, malignant tumor, and surgery in gynecologic hospitalizations. By February 20, 2020, only two of the three patients had met the clinical discharge criteria. Given the long and uncertain incubation period of COVID-19, screening for the virus infection should be carried out for all patients, both preoperatively and postoperatively. Postponement of scheduled gynecologic surgery for patients in the epidemic area should be considered.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Mass Screening/standards , Medical Records/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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