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1.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 19: 11, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865448

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures decreased in Indonesia. The existing commercial abdominal hysterectomy simulation model is expensive and difficult to reuse. This study compared residents' abdominal hysterectomy skills after simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following a video demonstration. METHODS: We randomized 3rd- and 4th-year obstetrics and gynecology residents to a video-based group (group 1), a simulation-based group (group 2), and a combination group (group 3). Abdominal hysterectomy skills were compared between before and after the educational intervention. The pre- and post-tests were scored by blinded experts using the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Global Rating Scale (GRS). RESULTS: A total of 33 residents were included in the pre- and post-tests. The OSATS and GRS mean differences after the intervention were higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (OSATS: 4.64 [95% CI, 2.90-6.37] vs. 2.55 [95% CI, 2.19-2.90] vs. 3.82 [95% CI, 2.41-5.22], P=0.047; GRS: 10.00 [95% CI, 7.01-12.99] vs. 5.18 [95% CI, 3.99-6.38] vs. 7.18 [95% CI, 6.11-8.26], P=0.006). The 3rd-year residents in group 3 had greater mean differences in OSATS and GRS scores than the 4th-year residents (OSATS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.88-8.46]; GRS: 12.83 [95% CI, 8.61-17.05] vs. OSATS: 3.40 [95% CI, 0.83-5.97]; GRS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.80-8.54]). CONCLUSION: Simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration can be a bridge to learning about abdominal hysterectomy for residents who had less surgical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hysterectomy , Simulation Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Hysterectomy/education , Indonesia/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Manikins , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Simulation Training/methods , Video Recording
3.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 48(7): 1955-1960, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846247

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to analyze how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the Obstetrics and Gynecology (OBG) residency program in India. STUDY DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based online survey aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic on the residency training program in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The questionnaire consisted of five sections: demographic details, information regarding COVID-19 status, clinical work load, teaching and research, and psychological impact. RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 280 OBG trainees from different medical colleges from India. Training activity in general was reduced considerably during the pandemic, according to 79.6% (n = 223) respondents. According to 13.21% (n = 37) and 5% (n = 14) respondents, reduction in training activity were due to cancelation of elective operations and reduced patient foot fall respectively. In 74.3% (n = 208) of cases, trainees reported worry about meeting the goals of their specialty training. Logistic regression showed that the extent of training reduction was not significantly associated with residents' age (p = 0.806), gender (p = 0.982), marital status (p = 0.363), and status of their duty in COVID-19 dedicated hospitals (p = 0.110). However, year of residency was a significant predictor of the perception about degree of training reduction. CONCLUSION: The pandemic imposed a significant impact on OBG residency training in India. During the pandemic, exposure to learning opportunities, surgeries, and teaching were reduced, which may result in a decline in the quality of care offered to women in the future if training deficit is not overcome. At the same time, pandemic also gave birth to newer insights of learning and interaction by online mode.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 28(5): 336-340, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788573

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a noticeable disruption in national medical and surgical care, including medical training. OBJECTIVES: We designed a survey to examine the educational effect of the pandemic on female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) training and secondarily to identify areas for innovation and opportunity in FPMRS fellowship training. STUDY DESIGN: We used an online survey, approved by the American Urogynecologic Society Scientific Committee and distributed it to FPMRS fellows with responses obtained and stored in REDCap. Demographic data, educational and surgical experiences, the implications of the changes, and data regarding working from home were collected. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 88 fellows, with 92% of respondents being obstetrics and gynecology- based. All 10 geographic regions had at least one response. Six regions had a 50% or greater redeployment rate. Only 16% of respondents were not redeployed or on-call to be redeployed. Eighty-five percent of the ob/gyn fellow redeployments were within their home department. There was no relationship between training region and redeployment. Only 31.7% of the respondents continued to perform any FPMRS surgery. Approximately 35% of the fellows desired the opportunity for surgical simulation training because surgical cases were reduced.No relationship was seen between either redeployment status and needs (P = 0.087-0.893) or difficulties (P = 0.092-0.864) nor training location and needs (P = 0.376-0.935) or difficulties (P = 0.110-0.921). CONCLUSIONS: There was a high rate of redeployment among fellows; however, this was not associated with their reported needs and difficulties. The FPMRS-related surgical experience was affected during this time, and the fellows desired increased surgical simulation training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 808084, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753415

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of COVID-19 poses a challenge for obstetrics and gynecology (O&G) residents. In order to improve the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of residents in epidemic prevention and control, reduce work pressure and improve professional skills, effective and sound training models are required to improve the protection of O&G residents from COVID-19. Method: A total of 38 standardized training O&G residents working in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in March 2020 was selected. They were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. The control group underwent a protection theory exposition according to the traditional training method, while the intervention group adopted a conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO) mode, arranged training courses in combination with the O&G specialty, and completed four modules of CDIO. After the training, the theoretical knowledge and practical operation were assessed, and the work stress and occupational identity scales were assessed. The assessment results and scores of the two groups of residents were analyzed. Results: Compared with the scores of the residents in the control group, the theoretical and technical scores of the residents in the intervention group significantly improved (P < 0.05). In the evaluation of organizational management, workload, interpersonal relationship, and doctor-patient relationship pressure, the scores of the intervention group were lower than those of the control group, with a statistical difference (P < 0.05). For the intervention group, the job stress and professional identity evaluation scores were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The CDIO model can effectively enhance the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of O&G residents in COVID-19 epidemic prevention protocols to reduce work pressure and improve professional identity. In addition, it provides new ideas, methods, and approaches for future clinical practice training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations
6.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2054304, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751978

ABSTRACT

Due to Covid-19, fellowship programs could not conduct in-person interviews during the 2020-2021 interview cycle and were forced to implement virtual interviews. We conducted two nationwide surveys of residency and fellowship Program Directors (PDs) involved in the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) Subspecialty Fellowship match cycle to gain a better understanding of virtual interviews from each of their perspectives. 1) Fellowship PDs' confidence in using a virtual platform to holistically evaluate applicants during the 2020-2021 match cycle, 2) Residency PD's perception of virtual interviews and impact on their program's operations, and 3) to assess the desire of fellowship and residency PDs to continue virtual recruitment during forthcoming interview seasons. Two separate nationwide web-based surveys were administered to 1) Ob/Gyn fellowship PDs and 2) residency PDs through SurveyMonkey from July-September 2020 to assess the impact of virtual interviews form each parties' perspective. Surveys solicited demographic information, four-point Likert scale questions, and free response questions Of programs meeting inclusion criteria, 75/111 (67.6%) fellowship PDs and 67/117 (57.3%) residency PDs responded to their respective surveys. Most fellowship PDs believed that they could confidently assess applicants' professionalism (88%) during a virtual interview and (90.7%) felt confident in making a rank-order list. However, only 73.3% were just as confident in preparing a rank list after a virtual interview as they have been with in-person interviews. Most residency PDs (69.9%) believed that virtual interviews made it easier for their program to comply with duty hours, and 76.8% agreed that virtual interviews allowed their residents to accept more interviews than an in-person format. Most fellowship PDs found virtual interviews convenient. However, difficulty in observing social interaction and gauging applicant interest may be the biggest challenge moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education
7.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 48(4): 1026-1032, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673213

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF STUDY: To assess impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental wellbeing, workload, training progression, and fertility planning among London Obstetrics and Gynecology trainees. DESIGN: An anonymous survey comprising 41 peer-validated questions was sent to London trainees. Anxiety and depression were screened using Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire 7 (GAD 7) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-seven trainees completed the questionnaire, of whom 54% were aged 25-34 years, 43% were senior trainees (ST6-7), and 51% classified themselves as Black, Asian, and Minority Asian (BAME). Although the percentage of respondents with "moderate"/"severe" GAD 7 and PHQ-9 scores was two to three times that of UK population estimates, median GAD 7 and PHQ-9 scores were 7 and 6 ("mild"). Sixteen percent deferred their fertility plans and 26% of ST6-7 trainees changed their Advanced Training Skills Modules. Other issues raised ranged from lack of assistance with electronic portfolio, postponement of examinations, poor senior input for mental health, lack of debriefing for redeployed trainees and requests for deferment of annual reviews. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has incurred an impact on mental health, training progression, and fertility planning of London trainees. With recommencement of nonemergency consultations and elective gynecology theater, alongside Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Recovery Blueprint to optimize learning opportunities, there is optimism that these challenges can be overcome. Trainers and trainees need to safeguard training opportunities and consider innovative forms of future learning, while anticipating potential effects of subsequent waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Fertility , Gynecology/education , Humans , London/epidemiology , Mental Health , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Nurse Educ Today ; 111: 105293, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over the past year, the occurrence of COVID-19 pandemic has challenged clinical education for health care students, due to the possibility of exposure to the virus and increased spread of the disease. Clinical training of midwifery students in gynecologic problems, based on the Iran midwifery education curriculum, was also disrupted during this pandemic. OBJECTIVES: This study was aimed at designing, implementing and evaluating a virtual clinical training protocol for midwifery internship in a Gynecology course. DESIGN: A semi-experimental study. SETTINGS: Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-seven midwifery interns in Gynecology course were recruited during two semesters in 2020. METHODS: Five steps based on the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) model were taken, which included 1) educational and skills needs assessment, 2) design, 3) development via focused group interviews and brainstorming with the presence of the midwifery department members in three sessions, 4) implementation including pretest and posttest, webinar, uploading the information of virtual patients, questions and correct answers, and 5) evaluation including knowledge assessment by a designed questionnaire and skills evaluation by the modified-Mini-CEX checklist. Data were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and paired t-test. RESULTS: After training, a significant increase (p < 0.001) was observed in scores of knowledge and interview skills, clinical judgment, consultation, efficiency, professionalism, clinical competence and total score of clinical skills. CONCLUSIONS: Training for gynecological diseases through virtual clinic promoted knowledge and clinical skills of midwifery interns. To enhance education, a virtual clinic may be used in crisis situations and in combination with teaching under normal circumstances by strengthening the infrastructure and removing barriers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Midwifery , Students, Nursing , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Midwifery/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 603, 2021 Dec 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has affected the training programs and the clinical schedules of surgical wards in many countries, including Iran. Also, the continuous involvement with COVID-19 patients has caused stress in health care workers; among them, residents are on the frontlines of care delivery. Therefore, we designed a study to assess the mental effects of these circumstances, and the effects on General Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynecology residency training in the busiest surgical departments of our university. METHODS: Participants of this cross-sectional study were residents of General Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynecology of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and the conventional sampling method was used. We used a questionnaire consisting of 47 questions (mostly using multiple choice questions and answers on the Likert scale) about personal, familial, and demographic characteristics; training activities, and mental effects of COVID-19. RESULTS: The response rate was 63.5%. (127 filled questionnaires). Around 96% of the residents had emotional problems, 85.9% were highly stressed about contracting COVID-19, 81.3% were worried about transferring it to their families; and 78% believed that their residency training had been impaired. CONCLUSION: Overall, our study shows the negative impact of COVID-19 on mental health and the training of residents. We propose that appropriate emotional support and suitable planning for compensation of training deficits is provided for residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Mental Health , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 305(3): 661-670, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549416

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic restricting clinical practice and exacerbating the lack of medical staff. There is currently a lack of young residents who are deciding on further training in gynecology and obstetrics. DESIGN: review and prospective, cross-sectional study. SETTING: the aim of this study was to investigate if structured mentoring programs can counteract this deficiency. POPULATION: medical students took part from Germany in the clinical phase. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was developed and distributed to students from January to October 2020. Epidemiological data, questions about mentoring experiences, necessity and their expected influence on career planning were collected and statistically evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: structured mentoring-programs can influence the choice of subject. In particular, men are still underrepresented. Research on the topic of mentoring during in the field of gynaecology and obstetrics is completely lacking. RESULTS: A representative number of 927 medical students took part in the survey. 22% (170/906) of the students had already participated in a mentoring program with a significantly higher proportion of men (69%; 117/170; p < 0.001). Of these, 94% (453/170) said this was helpful. 6% (55/906) wanted to pursue a career in gynecology and obstetrics. When asked about their appreciation for structured mentoring programs in gynecology and obstetrics, 95% (880/906) would participate and 94% agreed (871/906) that this could have an impact on their choice of specialist and career planning. CONCLUSIONS: An active provision of mentoring programs and more content can be a way of counteracting the shortage of residents in gynecology and obstetrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Male , Mentors , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 449, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, all Obstetrics and Gynecology fellowship interviews were held virtually for the 2020 fellowship match cycle. The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with virtual Obstetrics and Gynecology fellowship interviews and evaluate its effectiveness in assessing candidates. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey study that included all interviewing attending physicians and fellows from five Obstetrics and Gynecology subspecialties at a single academic institution following the 2020-2021 fellowship interview season. The survey consisted of 19 questions aimed to evaluate each subspecialty's virtual interview process, including its feasibility and performance in evaluating applicants. The primary outcome was the subjective utility of virtual interviews. Secondary outcomes included a comparison of responses from fellows and attending physicians. RESULTS: Thirty-six attendings and fellows completed the survey (36/53, 68% response rate). Interviewers felt applicants were able to convey themselves adequately during the virtual interview (92%) and the majority (70%) agreed that virtual interviews should be offered in future years. Attending physicians were more likely than fellows to state that the virtual interview process adequately assessed the candidates (Likert Scale Mean: 4.4 vs. 3.8, respectively, p = 0.02). Respondents highlighted decreased cost, time saved, and increased flexibility as benefits to the virtual interview process. CONCLUSION: The use of virtual interviews provides a favorable method for conducting fellowship interviews and should be considered for use in future application cycles. Most respondents were satisfied with the virtual interview process and found they were an effective tool for evaluating applicants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(4): 957-963, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345115

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this survey was to assess medical students' opinions about online learning programs and their preferences for specific teaching formats during COVID 19 pandemic. METHODS: Between May and July 2020, medical students who took an online gynecology and obstetrics course were asked to fill in a questionnaire anonymously. The questionnaire solicited their opinions about the course, the teaching formats used (online lectures, video tutorials featuring real patient scenarios, and online practical skills training), and digital learning in general. RESULTS: Of 103 students, 98 (95%) submitted questionnaires that were included in the analysis. 84 (86%) students had no problem with the online course and 70 (72%) desired more online teaching in the future. 37 (38%) respondents preferred online to traditional lectures. 72 (74%) students missed learning with real patients. All digital teaching formats received good and excellent ratings from > 80% of the students. CONCLUSION: The survey results show medical students' broad acceptance of the online course during COVID 19 pandemic and indicates that digital learning options can partially replace conventional face-to-face teaching. For content taught by lecture, online teaching might be an alternative or complement to traditional education. However, bedside-teaching remains a key pillar of medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Gynecology/education , Obstetrics/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(9): 1268-1277, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334589

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic has caused a crisis disrupting health systems worldwide. While efforts are being made to determine the extent of the disruption, the impact on gynecological oncology trainees/training has not been explored. We conducted an international survey of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on clinical practice, medical education, and mental well-being of surgical gynecological oncology trainees. METHODS: In our cross-sectional study, a customized web-based survey was circulated to surgical gynecological oncology trainees from national/international organizations from May to November 2020. Validated questionnaires assessed mental well-being. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fisher's exact test were used to analyse differences in means and proportions. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the effect of variables on psychological/mental well-being outcomes. Outcomes included clinical practice, medical education, anxiety and depression, distress, and mental well-being. RESULTS: A total of 127 trainees from 34 countries responded. Of these, 52% (66/127) were from countries with national training programs (UK/USA/Netherlands/Canada/Australia) and 48% (61/127) from countries with no national training programs. Altogether, 28% (35/125) had suspected/confirmed COVID-19, 28% (35/125) experienced a fall in household income, 20% (18/90) were self-isolated from households, 45% (57/126) had to re-use personal protective equipment, and 22% (28/126) purchased their own. In total, 32.3% (41/127) of trainees (16.6% (11/66) from countries with a national training program vs 49.1% (30/61) from countries with no national training program, p=0.02) perceived they would require additional time to complete their training fellowship. The additional training time anticipated did not differ between trainees from countries with or without national training programs (p=0.11) or trainees at the beginning or end of their fellowship (p=0.12). Surgical exposure was reduced for 50% of trainees. Departmental teaching continued throughout the pandemic for 69% (87/126) of trainees, although at reduced frequency for 16.1% (14/87), and virtually for 88.5% (77/87). Trainees reporting adequate pastoral support (defined as allocation of a dedicated mentor/access to occupational health support services) had better mental well-being with lower levels of anxiety/depression (p=0.02) and distress (p<0.001). Trainees from countries with a national training program experienced higher levels of distress (p=0.01). Mean (SD) pre-pandemic mental well-being scores were significantly higher than post-pandemic scores (8.3 (1.6) vs 7 (1.8); p<0.01). CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 has negatively impacted the surgical training, household income, and psychological/mental well-being of surgical gynecological oncology trainees. The overall clinical impact was worse for trainees in countries with no national training program than for those in countries with a national training program, although national training program trainees reported greater distress. COVID-19 sickness increased anxiety/depression. The recovery phase must focus on improving mental well-being and addressing lost training opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Gynecology/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgical Oncology/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol ; 34(4): 433-434, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324246
18.
Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg ; 27(9): e626-e629, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301415

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) fellowship applicants' perspectives on the effectiveness of the virtual interview format for creating their rank lists. METHODS: This was an anonymous internet-based survey study of applicants to the FPMRS fellowships in the United States, conducted from July 21, 2020, to August 5, 2020. A 34-item questionnaire queried applicants on satisfaction with interviews, comfort with creating a rank list and time, and financial cost of interviews. Applicants were invited to complete the survey via standardized emails distributed via the REDCap secure database. RESULTS: Forty-two (56.7%) of 74 applicants completed the survey. The majority of respondents were somewhat satisfied or very satisfied (92.9%) with the virtual interview process and felt comfortable ranking the programs (83.3%). A total of 9.8% of respondents found virtual interviews somewhat or much better than in-person interviews with regards to being informative and helpful, whereas 61% found them to be about the same. A majority (75.6%) found virtual interviews somewhat or much less stressful compared with in-person interviews. The majority (97.5%) spent less than $2,000 during the application process compared with more than $4,000 (87.8%) that they had anticipated spending if the interviews were in person. CONCLUSIONS: Our data revealed that FPMRS applicants overall had a positive experience with the virtual interview platform and felt comfortable creating a rank list of programs based on those interviews.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic , Videoconferencing , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Gynecology/education , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Urology/education
19.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(6): 1383-1386, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293366

ABSTRACT

Despite having a good understanding of medicine, doctors lack clinical skills, problem-solving abilities, and the ability to apply knowledge to patient care, particularly in unanticipated circumstances. To overcome this, medical education has evolved into a system-oriented core curriculum with cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning goals. With an emphasis on problem-based learning, the educator's aim is to establish a long-term, predetermined improvement in the learner's behavior, acquired skills, and attitudes (Datta R, Upadhyay KK, Jaideep CN. Simulation and its role in medical education. Med J Armed Forces India. 2012;68(2):167-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-1237(12)60040-9 ). However, teaching these disciplines to real patients is almost impossible; this is where simulation comes in. This opinion paper will discuss the relevance and necessity of a simulation-based undergraduate curriculum in obstetrics and gynecology. What are the biggest obstacles that medical schools face in making the most of simulation-based learning, and how can they be overcome?


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Gynecology/education , Obstetrics/education , Simulation Training , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Schools, Medical
20.
Obstet Gynecol ; 137(6): 1122, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288106
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