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3.
Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am ; 48(3): 487-499, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364383

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine, which provides safe, equitable, patient-centered care, has gained significant momentum in recent years. Success using telemedicine has been seen across diverse groups of patients for a variety of diagnoses, including older adults and gynecology patients. In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, federal and local governments have issued provisions to improve reimbursement and accessibility to telemedicine. In urogynecology, virtual care is growing in popularity, along with a growing body of literature in support of this method of providing care. Providers should use clinical judgment and existing data to guide them on which clinical conditions are appropriate for virtual care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gynecology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Urology/methods , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis
4.
J Ovarian Res ; 14(1): 35, 2021 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090643

ABSTRACT

China and the rest of the world are experiencing an outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Patients with cancer are more susceptible to viral infection and are more likely to develop severe complications, as compared to healthy individuals. The growing spread of COVID-19 presents challenges for the clinical care of patients with gynecological malignancies. Ovarian debulking surgery combined with the frequent need for chemotherapy is most likely why ovarian cancer was rated as the gynecologic cancer most affected by COVID-19. Therefore, ovarian cancer presents a particular challenging task. Concerning the ovarian cancer studies with confirmed COVID-19 reported from large-scale general hospitals in Wuhan, we hold that the treatment plan was adjusted appropriately and an individualized remedy was implemented. The recommendations discussed here were developed mainly based on the experience from Wuhan. We advise that the management strategy for ovarian cancer patients should be adjusted in the light of the local epidemic situation and formulated according to the pathological type, tumor stage and the current treatment phase. Online medical service is an effective and convenient communication platform during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Female , Gynecology/methods , Hospitals, General , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(3): 621-626, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060209

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the initial ASRM COVID-19 recommendations for infertility treatment held by women's health providers within varying subspecialties, as well as their attitudes toward pregnancy and fertility during this time. METHODS: An electronic survey was sent to all women's healthcare providers, including physicians, mid-level providers and nurses, in all subspecialties of obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) at a large tertiary care university-affiliated hospital. RESULTS: Of the 278 eligible providers, the survey response rate was 45% (n = 127). Participants represented 8 Ob/Gyn subspecialties and all professional levels. Participants age 18-30 years were significantly more likely to feel that women should have access to infertility treatment despite the burden level of COVID-19 in respective community/states (p = 0.0058). Participants within the subspecialties of general Ob/Gyn, maternal foetal medicine and gynecologic oncology were significantly more likely to disagree that all women should refrain from planned conception during the COVID-19 pandemic, in comparison to those in urogynecology and reproductive endocrinology and infertility (p = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Considering the immediate and unknown long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on fertility care delivery, a better understanding of perceptions regarding infertility management during this time is important. Our study shows overall support for the initial ASRM recommendations, representing a wide spectrum of women's health providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Reproductive Medicine/methods , Women's Health , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Gynecology/methods , Humans , Male , Obstetrics , Pandemics , Perception/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 32(6): 456-460, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998518

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Amidst the worldwide coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, a new medical landscape revolving around telemedicine has arisen. The purpose of this review is to describe and analyze current urogynecologic guidelines for optimizing usage of telemedicine when treating women with pelvic floor disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: Women managed by urogynecologists are on average older, and hence more likely to have comorbidities that make them susceptible to developing coronavirus disease 2019 with severe symptoms. Telemedicine is key in minimizing exposure without sacrificing treatments and quality of life. Recent studies published prior to the pandemic helped set the stage for successful components of virtual care. Nonsurgical options are crucial to beginning a treatment plan while elective surgeries are still restricted in many hospitals. Medication management and innovative technology, such as smart telephone applications, play a prominent role. The comprehensive literature review discussed here describes the degree of evidence supporting each management option, while also noting the limitations of telemedicine. SUMMARY: Telemedicine has opened a new door for the field of urogynecology allowing for continued safe, evidence-based care. The pandemic culture has tipped the balance away from surgery and toward nonsurgical treatments while attempting not to sacrifice outcomes or quality of care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Gynecology/methods , Pandemics , Pelvic Floor Disorders/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/methods , Urology/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Gynecology/standards , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Telemedicine/standards , Urology/standards
8.
Gynecol Oncol ; 160(3): 649-654, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgery is the cornerstone of gynecological cancer management, but inpatient treatment may expose both patients and healthcare staff to COVID-19 infections. Plans to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic have been implemented widely, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these plans in maintaining safe surgical care delivery. AIM: To evaluate the effects of mitigating plans implemented on the delivery of gynecological cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A comparative cohort study of patients treated in a high-volume tertiary gyneoncological centre in the United Kingdom. Prospectively-recorded consecutive operations performed and early peri-operative outcomes during the same calendar periods (January-August) in 2019 and 2020 were compared. RESULTS: In total, 585 operations were performed (296 in 2019; 289 in 2020). There was no significant difference in patient demographics. Types of surgery performed were different (p = 0.034), with fewer cytoreductive surgeries for ovarian cancer and laparoscopic procedures (p = 0.002) in 2020. There was no difference in intra-operative complication rates, critical care admission rates or length of stay. One patient had confirmed COVID-19 infection (0.4%). The 30-day post-operative complication rates were significantly higher in 2020 than in 2019 (58 [20.1%] versus 32 [10.8%]; p = 0.002) for both minor and major complications. This increase, primarily from March 2020 onwards, coincided with the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. CONCLUSIONS: Maintaining surgical throughput with meticulous and timely planning is feasible during the COVID-19 pandemic but this was associated with an increase in post-operative complications due to a multitude of reasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Gynecology/organization & administration , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Cytoreduction Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Female , Gynecology/methods , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Intraoperative Complications/epidemiology , Laparoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Oncology Service, Hospital , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Surgical Oncology/methods , Tertiary Care Centers , United Kingdom
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 89, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948205

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is an ideal innovation to achieve social distancing, one of the mitigating strategies during the current Covid 19 pandemic. Zimbabwe effected a 21day lockdown from the 2nd of March 2020 to control the spread of the Covid 19 infection. Free teleconsultation service was provided by the researcher. We sought to determine the effectiveness and acceptability of telemedicine in Obstetrics and Gynaecology during this period. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective and prospective analysis of the messages from the WhatsApp consults for demographic characteristics, type and classification of condition, level of urgency, ability to make a diagnosis and the type of recommendation offered. A follow-up message was used to assess effectiveness of the medical advice given and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: Of 109 women who used telemedicine 67consented. The average age was 31 years and most of the women were married, had university or tertiary college education and were urban dwellers. Forty-nine (73.1%) cases were Gynaecological consults and 51 (76.1%) were elective cases. Twenty (29.9%) and fourteen (20.8%) cases needed elective and urgent hospital referral respectively. A diagnosis was made in 33(49.3%) of the cases from the available information during the consult. Thirty-five (52.2%) cases had recovered whilst 27(40.3%) cases were still waiting further assessments at the end of the follow up. The patients were satisfied with the service in 94% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Telemedicine services provided during the lockdown period were effective and acceptable in managing women with Obstetrics and Gynaecological conditions. Telemedicine should be rolled out during this pandemic to limit risk to patients and healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology/methods , Obstetrics/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Quarantine , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult , Zimbabwe
10.
J Gynecol Oncol ; 31(6): e92, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-881380

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused rapid and drastic changes in cancer management. The Italian Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (SIGO), and the Multicenter Italian Trials in Ovarian cancer and gynecologic malignancies (MITO) promoted a national survey aiming to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on clinical activity of gynecologist oncologists and to assess the implementation of containment measures against COVID-19 diffusion. METHODS: The survey consisted of a self-administered, anonymous, online questionnaire. The survey was sent via email to all the members of the SIGO, and MITO groups on April 7, 2020, and was closed on April 20, 2020. RESULTS: Overall, 604 participants completed the questionnaire with a response-rate of 70%. The results of this survey suggest that gynecologic oncology units had set a proactive approach to COVID-19 outbreak. Triage methods were adopted in order to minimize in-hospital diffusion of COVID-19. Only 38% of gynecologic surgeons were concerned about COVID-19 outbreak. Although 73% of the participants stated that COVID-19 has not significantly modified their everyday practice, 21% declared a decrease of the use of laparoscopy in favor of open surgery (19%). However, less than 50% of surgeons adopted specific protection against COVID-19. Additionally, responders suggested to delay cancer treatment (10%-15%), and to perform less radical surgical procedures (20%-25%) during COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: National guidelines should be implemented to further promote the safety of patients and health care providers. International cooperation is of paramount importance, as heavily affected nations can serve as an example to find out ways to safely preserve clinical activity during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gynecology/methods , Infection Control/methods , Medical Oncology/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , International Cooperation , Italy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/methods , Triage/statistics & numerical data
11.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 151(3): 341-346, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of roster reorganization on ensuring uninterrupted services while providing necessary relief to healthcare workers (HCW) in the obstetrics department of a tertiary care center amid the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: The COVID-19 rostering response began in April 2020 and evolved in two phases: (1) development of new areas for screening and managing suspected/positive cases of COVID-19; and (2) team segregation according to area of work. The impact of these changes on HCWs and patients was assessed 3 months later. RESULTS: Developing separate areas helped to minimize the risk of exposure of patients and HCWs to those with COVID-19. Residents and consultants worked intensively in clinical areas for 1 week followed by 1-2 weeks of non-clinical or standby assignments, providing adequate opportunity for isolation. Frequent re-evaluation of the roster was nevertheless required as the pandemic progressed. Segregating teams vertically significantly reduced the number of contacts identified on contact tracing and quarantine leaves, while maintaining patient satisfaction with no increase in adverse events. Residents found the roster to be "smart" and "pandemic-appropriate." CONCLUSION: The "COVID emergency roster" helped ensure quality care with minimum risk of exposure and sufficient breaks for physical and psychological recovery of HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Isolation/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Gynecology/methods , Humans , India , Male , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Young Adult
12.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 46(11): 2237-2241, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751664

ABSTRACT

AIM: A nationwide questionnaire survey was performed to evaluate how Japanese Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG) members dealt with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic during the declared nationwide emergency. METHODS: We sent questionnaires to members of JSOG via official email. Participants answered anonymously using Google forms. RESULTS: Two (0.08%) JSOG members had contracted COVID-19. There was a clear decrease in the number of patients scheduled for operation, not only for malignant but also for benign diseases. A decrease in the number of outpatients for infertility treatment was also observed. Polymerase chain reaction testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was available in 20.4% of the facilities. Inpatients and outpatients were requested to wear masks, limit the number of contacts and check body temperature when visiting hospitals/clinics. During parturition care, caregivers and physicians wore gloves, masks (other than N-95), face shields and gowns. About 66% and 80% of the facilities decided to transfer pregnant women if they had asymptomatic and symptomatic infection, respectively. Cesarean section was typically chosen as delivery mode in infected women. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic provoked significant changes in obstetrics and gynecology practices in Japan. Apparently, nosocomial infections were largely prevented due to these changes, although some of them might not have been necessary.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gynecology/methods , Humans , Japan , Obstetrics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(6): 151291, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-666043

ABSTRACT

The rapid evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City during the spring of 2020 challenged the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center to rely on its core values to respond effectively. In particular, five core values, "5 C's," were engaged: Communication; Collaboration; Continuity; Community; and Culture. Beginning on March 11, 2020, the Department of Ob/Gyn used these values to navigate an unprecedented public health crisis, continuing to deliver care to the women and families of New York City, to protecting and supporting its team, and to sharing its lessons learned with the national and international women's health community.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Gynecology/methods , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Continuity of Patient Care , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Female , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , New York City/epidemiology , Organizational Culture , Pregnancy , Women's Health
15.
J Perinat Med ; 48(9): 997-1000, 2020 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634528

ABSTRACT

Since SARS-COV-2 appeared in Wuhan City, China and rapidly spread throughout Europe, a real revolution occurred in the daily routine and in the organization of the entire health system. While non-urgent clinical services have been reduced as far as possible, all kind of specialists turned into COVID-19 specialists. Obstetric assistance cannot be suspended and, at the same time, safety must be guaranteed. In addition, as COVID-19 positive pregnant patients require additional care, some of the clinical habits need to be changed to face emerging needs for a vulnerable but unstoppable kind of patients. We report the management set up in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit during the COVID-19 era in a University Hospital in Milan, Italy.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Obstetrics/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Female , Gynecology/methods , Gynecology/organization & administration , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Obstetrics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Postnatal Care/methods , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Prenatal Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 223(1): 3-8, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634523

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019 became a major epidemic threat in China and later spread worldwide. During the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in mainland China, the Chinese Obstetricians and Gynecologists Association distributed guidelines regarding the care of gynecologic patients. These guidelines were developed by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital and represent an effort to integrate infection control strategy and promote professionalism in medical practice. The guidelines represent collaboration with experts from 31 provinces and autonomous regions of mainland China over 2 weeks' time. With the implementation of these guidelines, no nosocomial infections of coronavirus disease 2019 have been identified at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. We think these guidelines might be helpful to departments of obstetrics and gynecology internationally during these unprecedented times. In our guidelines, we describe basic infection precaution principles, an epidemiologic screening tool, prioritization of surgical procedures, and operating room requirements. Using these principles, we then review the management of gynecologic patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic in the outpatient and operative and nonoperative inpatient settings and in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gynecology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Clinical Trials as Topic , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 30(8): 1101-1107, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has affected gynecologic cancer management. The goal of this survey was to evaluate changes that occurred in gynecologic oncology practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A anonymous survey consisting of 33 questions (https://sites.google.com/view/gyncacovidfmartinelli) regarding interaction between gynecologic cancers and COVID-19 was distributed online via social media from April 9 to April 30, 2020. Basic descriptive statistics were applied. Analytics of survey-diffusion and generated-interest (visualizations, engagement rates, response rate) were analyzed. RESULTS: The survey received 20 836 visualizations, generating an average engagement rates by reach of 4.7%. The response rate was 30%. A total of 86% of respondents completed the survey, for a total of 187 physicians surveyed across 49 countries. The majority (143/187; 76%) were gynecologic oncologists, and most were ≤50 years old (146/187; 78%). A total of 49.7% (93/187) were facing the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, while 26.7% (50/187) and 23.5% (44/187) were in the peak and plateau phases, respectively. For 97.3% (182/187) of respondents COVID-19 affected or changed their respective clinical practice. Between 16% (27/165) (before surgery) and 25% (26/102) (before medical treatment) did not perform any tests to rule out COVID-19 infection among patients. The majority of respondents did not alter indications of treatment if patients were COVID-19-negative, while treatments were generally postponed in COVID-19-positive patients. Treatments were considered priority for: early stage high-risk uterine cancers (85/187; 45%), newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer (76/187; 41%), and locally advanced cervical cancer (76/187; 41%). Treatment of early stage low-grade endometrioid endometrial cancer was deferred according to 49% (91/187) of respondents, with hormonal treatment as the option of therapy (31%; 56/178). A total of 77% (136/177) of respondents reported no changes in (surgical) treatment for early stage cervical cancer in COVID-19-negative patients, while treatment was postponed by 54% (96/177) of respondent, if the patient tested COVID-19-positive. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancers was considered by over one-third of respondents as well as hypofractionation of radiation treatment for locally advanced cervical cancers. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 affected the treatment of gynecologic cancers patients, both in terms of prioritization and identification of strategies to reduce hospital access and length of stay. Social media is a reliable tool to perform fast-tracking, worldwide surveys.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Gynecology/trends , Medical Oncology/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/diagnosis , Global Health , Gynecology/methods , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/trends , Male , Medical Oncology/methods , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media
18.
Int Urogynecol J ; 31(6): 1063-1089, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-125204

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The COVID-19 pandemic and the desire to "flatten the curve" of transmission have significantly affected the way providers care for patients. Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgeons (FPMRS) must provide high quality of care through remote access such as telemedicine. No clear guidelines exist on the use of telemedicine in FPMRS. Using expedited literature review methodology, we provide guidance regarding management of common outpatient urogynecology scenarios during the pandemic. METHODS: We grouped FPMRS conditions into those in which virtual management differs from direct in-person visits and conditions in which treatment would emphasize behavioral and conservative counseling but not deviate from current management paradigms. We conducted expedited literature review on four topics (telemedicine in FPMRS, pessary management, urinary tract infections, urinary retention) and addressed four other topics (urinary incontinence, prolapse, fecal incontinence, defecatory dysfunction) based on existing systematic reviews and guidelines. We further compiled expert consensus regarding management of FPMRS patients in the virtual setting, scenarios when in-person visits are necessary, symptoms that should alert providers, and specific considerations for FPMRS patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. RESULTS: Behavioral, medical, and conservative management will be valuable as first-line virtual treatments. Certain situations will require different treatments in the virtual setting while others will require an in-person visit despite the risks of COVID-19 transmission. CONCLUSIONS: We have presented guidance for treating FPMRS conditions via telemedicine based on rapid literature review and expert consensus and presented it in a format that can be actively referenced.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female Urogenital Diseases/therapy , Gynecology/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Female Urogenital Diseases/virology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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