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1.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0251951, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394538

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to explore potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity towards HeLa and HT29 cells displayed by Pediocin PA-1. We did this by carrying out sequence alignments and 3D modelling of related bacteriocins which have been studied in greater detail: Microcin E492, Enterocin AB heterodimer and Divercin V41. Microcin E492 interacts with Toll-Like Receptor 4 in order to activate an apoptosis reaction, sequence alignment showed a high homology between Pediocin PA-1 and Microcin E492 whereas 3D modelling showed Pediocin PA-1 interacting with TLR-4 in a way reminiscent of Microcin E492. Furthermore, Pediocin PA-1 had the highest homology with the Enterocin heterodimer, particularly chain A; Enterocin has also shown to cause an apoptotic response in cancer cells. Based on this we are led to strongly believe Pediocin PA-1 interacts with TLRs in order to cause cell death. If this is the case, it would explain the difference in cytotoxicity towards HeLa over HT29 cells, due to difference in expression of particular TLRs. Overall, we believe Pediocin PA-1 exhibits a dual effect which is dose dependant, like that of Microcin. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we were unable to carry out experiments in the lab, and the unavailability of important data meant we were unable to provide and validate out solid conclusions, but rather suggestions. However, bioinformatic analysis is still able to provide information regarding structure and sequence analysis to draw plausible and evidence based conclusions. We have been able to highlight interesting findings and how these could be translated into future research and therapeutics in order to improve the quality of treatment and life of cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Bacteriocins/chemistry , Bacteriocins/pharmacology , Pediocins/chemistry , Pediocins/pharmacology , Protein Conformation , Amino Acid Sequence , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Bacteriocins/genetics , Bridged-Ring Compounds/chemistry , Bridged-Ring Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cell Survival/drug effects , HT29 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Pediocins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282518

ABSTRACT

The usefulness of anti-inflammatory drugs as an adjunct therapy to improve outcomes in COVID-19 patients is intensely discussed in this paper. Willow bark (Salix cortex) has been used for centuries to relieve pain, inflammation, and fever. Its main active ingredient, salicin, is metabolized in the human body into salicylic acid, the precursor of the commonly used pain drug acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Here, we report on the in vitro anti-inflammatory efficacy of two methanolic Salix extracts, standardized to phenolic compounds, in comparison to ASA in the context of a SARS-CoV-2 peptide challenge. Using SARS-CoV-2 peptide/IL-1ß- or LPS-activated human PBMCs and an inflammatory intestinal Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture, Salix extracts, and ASA concentration-dependently suppressed prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a principal mediator of inflammation. The inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity, but not protein expression was observed for ASA and one Salix extract. In activated PBMCs, the suppression of relevant cytokines (i.e., IL-6, IL-1ß, and IL-10) was seen for both Salix extracts. The anti-inflammatory capacity of Salix extracts was still retained after transepithelial passage and liver cell metabolism in an advanced co-culture model system consisting of intestinal Caco-2/HT29-MTX cells and differentiated hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells. Taken together, our in vitro data suggest that Salix extracts might present an additional anti-inflammatory treatment option in the context of SARS-CoV-2 peptides challenge; however, more confirmatory data are needed.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Aspirin/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Benzyl Alcohols/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Cyclooxygenase 2/drug effects , Cytokines/metabolism , Dinoprostone/metabolism , Glucosides/metabolism , HT29 Cells , Humans , Inflammation , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Plant Bark/chemistry , Plant Extracts/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
3.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100449, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091794

ABSTRACT

Hck, a Src family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (SFK), has recently been established as an attractive pharmacological target to improve pulmonary function in COVID-19 patients. Hck inhibitors are also well known for their regulatory role in various malignancies and autoimmune diseases. Curcumin has been previously identified as an excellent DYRK-2 inhibitor, but curcumin's fate is tainted by its instability in the cellular environment. Besides, small molecules targeting the inactive states of a kinase are desirable to reduce promiscuity. Here, we show that functionalization of the 4-arylidene position of the fluorescent curcumin scaffold with an aryl nitrogen mustard provides a stable Hck inhibitor (Kd = 50 ± 10 nM). The mustard curcumin derivative preferentially interacts with the inactive conformation of Hck, similar to type-II kinase inhibitors that are less promiscuous. Moreover, the lead compound showed no inhibitory effect on three other kinases (DYRK2, Src, and Abl). We demonstrate that the cytotoxicity may be mediated via inhibition of the SFK signaling pathway in triple-negative breast cancer and murine macrophage cells. Our data suggest that curcumin is a modifiable fluorescent scaffold to develop selective kinase inhibitors by remodeling its target affinity and cellular stability.


Subject(s)
Curcumin/pharmacology , Drug Design , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-hck/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Cloning, Molecular , Curcumin/analogs & derivatives , Curcumin/chemical synthesis , Drug Stability , Epithelial Cells/enzymology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Escherichia coli/genetics , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Gene Expression , Gene Expression Regulation , Genetic Vectors/chemistry , Genetic Vectors/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , HT29 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , /metabolism , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/genetics , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-abl/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-abl/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-hck/chemistry , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-hck/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-hck/metabolism , RAW 264.7 Cells , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , src-Family Kinases/genetics , src-Family Kinases/metabolism
4.
Cell Death Differ ; 28(5): 1610-1626, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957566

ABSTRACT

The receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) is a key mediator of regulated cell death and inflammation. Recent studies suggest that RIPK1 inhibition would fundamentally improve the therapy of RIPK1-dependent organ damage in stroke, myocardial infarction, kidney failure, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Additionally, it could ameliorate or prevent multi-organ failure induced by cytokine release in the context of hyperinflammation, as seen in COVID-19 patients. Therefore, we searched for a RIPK1 inhibitor and present the aromatic antiepileptic and FDA-approved drug primidone (Liskantin®) as a potent inhibitor of RIPK1 activation in vitro and in a murine model of TNFα-induced shock, which mimics the hyperinflammatory state of cytokine release syndrome. Furthermore, we detected for the first time RIPK1 activation in the respiratory tract epithelium of hospitalized patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our data provide a strong rationale for evaluating the drug primidone in conditions of hyperinflammation in humans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , Primidone/pharmacology , Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Death/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , HT29 Cells , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/enzymology , Inflammation/pathology , Jurkat Cells , Mice , NIH 3T3 Cells , U937 Cells
5.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(22): 22495-22508, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934684

ABSTRACT

ACE2 was observed as the cell surface receptor of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Interestingly, we also found ACE2 positivity inside the cell nucleus. The ACE2 levels changed during cell differentiation and aging and varied in distinct cell types. We observed ACE2 depletion in the aortas of aging female mice, similarly, the aging caused ACE2 decrease in the kidneys. Compared with that in the heart, brain and kidneys, the ACE2 level was the lowest in the mouse lungs. In mice exposed to nicotine, ACE2 was not changed in olfactory bulbs but in the lungs, ACE2 was upregulated in females and downregulated in males. These observations indicate the distinct gender-dependent properties of ACE2. Differentiation into enterocytes, and cardiomyocytes, caused ACE2 depletion. The cardiomyogenesis was accompanied by renin upregulation, delayed in HDAC1-depleted cells. In contrast, vitamin D2 decreased the renin level while ACE2 was upregulated. Together, the ACE2 level is high in non-differentiated cells. This protein is more abundant in the tissues of mouse embryos and young mice in comparison with older animals. Mostly, downregulation of ACE2 is accompanied by renin upregulation. Thus, the pathophysiology of COVID-19 disease should be further studied not only by considering the ACE2 level but also the whole renin-angiotensin system.


Subject(s)
Aging/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , A549 Cells , Age Factors , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/physiology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/physiology , HEK293 Cells , HT29 Cells , Humans , Male , Mice , Pandemics , Renin/metabolism , Sex Factors
6.
Viruses ; 12(6)2020 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602214

ABSTRACT

As of June 2020, the number of people infected with severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to skyrocket, with more than 6.7 million cases worldwide. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations (UN) has highlighted the need for better control of SARS-CoV-2 infections. However, developing novel virus-specific vaccines, monoclonal antibodies and antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2 can be time-consuming and costly. Convalescent sera and safe-in-man broad-spectrum antivirals (BSAAs) are readily available treatment options. Here, we developed a neutralization assay using SARS-CoV-2 strain and Vero-E6 cells. We identified the most potent sera from recovered patients for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. We also screened 136 safe-in-man broad-spectrum antivirals against the SARS-CoV-2 infection in Vero-E6 cells and identified nelfinavir, salinomycin, amodiaquine, obatoclax, emetine and homoharringtonine. We found that a combination of orally available virus-directed nelfinavir and host-directed amodiaquine exhibited the highest synergy. Finally, we developed a website to disseminate the knowledge on available and emerging treatments of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Neutralization Tests/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Amodiaquine/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19 , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Emetine/pharmacology , HEK293 Cells , HT29 Cells , Homoharringtonine/pharmacology , Humans , Immune Sera/immunology , Immunization, Passive/methods , Indoles , Nelfinavir/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pyrans/pharmacology , Pyrroles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells
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