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1.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(635): eabl8124, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736022

ABSTRACT

Despite the success of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines, there remains a need for more prevention and treatment options for individuals remaining at risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the viral spike protein have potential to both prevent and treat COVID-19 and reduce the risk of severe disease and death. Here, we describe AZD7442, a combination of two mAbs, AZD8895 (tixagevimab) and AZD1061 (cilgavimab), that simultaneously bind to distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes on the spike protein receptor binding domain to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Initially isolated from individuals with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection, the two mAbs were designed to extend their half-lives and reduce effector functions. The AZD7442 mAbs individually prevent the spike protein from binding to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor, blocking virus cell entry, and neutralize all tested SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. In a nonhuman primate model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, prophylactic AZD7442 administration prevented infection, whereas therapeutic administration accelerated virus clearance from the lung. In an ongoing phase 1 study in healthy participants (NCT04507256), a 300-mg intramuscular injection of AZD7442 provided SARS-CoV-2 serum geometric mean neutralizing titers greater than 10-fold above those of convalescent serum for at least 3 months, which remained threefold above those of convalescent serum at 9 months after AZD7442 administration. About 1 to 2% of serum AZD7442 was detected in nasal mucosa, a site of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Extrapolation of the time course of serum AZD7442 concentration suggests AZD7442 may provide up to 12 months of protection and benefit individuals at high-risk of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Drug Combinations , Half-Life , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Primates , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
2.
EBioMedicine ; 76: 103856, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many repurposed drugs have progressed rapidly to Phase 2 and 3 trials in COVID19 without characterisation of Pharmacokinetics /Pharmacodynamics including safety data. One such drug is nafamostat mesylate. METHODS: We present the findings of a phase Ib/IIa open label, platform randomised controlled trial of intravenous nafamostat in hospitalised patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonitis. Patients were assigned randomly to standard of care (SoC), nafamostat or an alternative therapy. Nafamostat was administered as an intravenous infusion at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/h for a maximum of seven days. The analysis population included those who received any dose of the trial drug and all patients randomised to SoC. The primary outcomes of our trial were the safety and tolerability of intravenous nafamostat as an add on therapy for patients hospitalised with COVID-19 pneumonitis. FINDINGS: Data is reported from 42 patients, 21 of which were randomly assigned to receive intravenous nafamostat. 86% of nafamostat-treated patients experienced at least one AE compared to 57% of the SoC group. The nafamostat group were significantly more likely to experience at least one AE (posterior mean odds ratio 5.17, 95% credible interval (CI) 1.10 - 26.05) and developed significantly higher plasma creatinine levels (posterior mean difference 10.57 micromol/L, 95% CI 2.43-18.92). An average longer hospital stay was observed in nafamostat patients, alongside a lower rate of oxygen free days (rate ratio 0.55-95% CI 0.31-0.99, respectively). There were no other statistically significant differences in endpoints between nafamostat and SoC. PK data demonstrated that intravenous nafamostat was rapidly broken down to inactive metabolites. We observed no significant anticoagulant effects in thromboelastometry. INTERPRETATION: In hospitalised patients with COVID-19, we did not observe evidence of anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant or antiviral activity with intravenous nafamostat, and there were additional adverse events. FUNDING: DEFINE was funded by LifeArc (an independent medical research charity) under the STOPCOVID award to the University of Edinburgh. We also thank the Oxford University COVID-19 Research Response Fund (BRD00230).


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Benzamidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Guanidines/therapeutic use , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacokinetics , Benzamidines/adverse effects , Benzamidines/pharmacokinetics , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Guanidines/adverse effects , Guanidines/pharmacokinetics , Half-Life , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1416, 2022 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655626

ABSTRACT

The control of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK has necessitated restrictions on amateur and professional sports due to the perceived infection risk to competitors, via direct person to person transmission, or possibly via the surfaces of sports equipment. The sharing of sports equipment such as tennis balls was therefore banned by some sport's governing bodies. We sought to investigate the potential of sporting equipment as transmission vectors of SARS-CoV-2. Ten different types of sporting equipment, including balls from common sports, were inoculated with 40 µl droplets containing clinically relevant concentrations of live SARS-CoV-2 virus. Materials were then swabbed at time points relevant to sports (1, 5, 15, 30, 90 min). The amount of live SARS-CoV-2 recovered at each time point was enumerated using viral plaque assays, and viral decay and half-life was estimated through fitting linear models to log transformed data from each material. At one minute, SARS-CoV-2 virus was recovered in only seven of the ten types of equipment with the low dose inoculum, one at five minutes and none at 15 min. Retrievable virus dropped significantly for all materials tested using the high dose inoculum with mean recovery of virus falling to 0.74% at 1 min, 0.39% at 15 min and 0.003% at 90 min. Viral recovery, predicted decay, and half-life varied between materials with porous surfaces limiting virus transmission. This study shows that there is an exponential reduction in SARS-CoV-2 recoverable from a range of sports equipment after a short time period, and virus is less transferrable from materials such as a tennis ball, red cricket ball and cricket glove. Given this rapid loss of viral load and the fact that transmission requires a significant inoculum to be transferred from equipment to the mucous membranes of another individual it seems unlikely that sports equipment is a major cause for transmission of SARS-CoV-2. These findings have important policy implications in the context of the pandemic and may promote other infection control measures in sports to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission and urge sports equipment manufacturers to identify surfaces that may or may not be likely to retain transferable virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/virology , Half-Life , Humans , Linear Models , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sports Equipment , Surface Properties
4.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(48): 20095-20108, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531986

ABSTRACT

Chemical modifications of native proteins can affect their stability, activity, interactions, localization, and more. However, there are few nongenetic methods for the installation of chemical modifications at a specific protein site in cells. Here we report a covalent ligand directed release (CoLDR) site-specific labeling strategy, which enables the installation of a variety of functional tags on a target protein while releasing the directing ligand. Using this approach, we were able to label various proteins such as BTK, K-RasG12C, and SARS-CoV-2 PLpro with different tags. For BTK we have shown selective labeling in cells of both alkyne and fluorophores tags. Protein labeling by traditional affinity methods often inhibits protein activity since the directing ligand permanently occupies the target binding pocket. We have shown that using CoLDR chemistry, modification of BTK by these probes in cells preserves its activity. We demonstrated several applications for this approach including determining the half-life of BTK in its native environment with minimal perturbation, as well as quantification of BTK degradation by a noncovalent proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC) by in-gel fluorescence. Using an environment-sensitive "turn-on" fluorescent probe, we were able to monitor ligand binding to the active site of BTK. Finally, we have demonstrated efficient CoLDR-based BTK PROTACs (DC50 < 100 nM), which installed a CRBN binder onto BTK. This approach joins very few available labeling strategies that maintain the target protein activity and thus makes an important addition to the toolbox of chemical biology.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/chemistry , Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry , Ligands , Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Adenine/chemistry , Adenine/metabolism , Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase/metabolism , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Half-Life , Humans , Piperidines/chemistry , Piperidines/metabolism , Proteolysis , Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/metabolism , Pyrimidines/chemistry , Pyrimidines/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480791

ABSTRACT

Novel xanthine and imidazolone derivatives were synthesized based on oxazolone derivatives 2a-c as a key intermediate. The corresponding xanthine 3-5 and imidazolone derivatives 6-13 were obtained via reaction of oxazolone derivative 2a-c with 5,6-diaminouracils 1a-e under various conditions. Xanthine compounds 3-5 were obtained by cyclocondensation of 5,6-diaminouracils 1a-c with different oxazolones in glacial acetic acid. Moreover, 5,6-diaminouracils 1a-e were reacted with oxazolones 2a-c in presence of drops of acetic acid under fused condition yielding the imidazolone derivatives 6-13. Furthermore, Schiff base of compounds 14-16 were obtained by condensing 5,6-diaminouracils 1a,b,e with 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde in acetic acid. The structural identity of the resulting compounds was resolved by IR, 1H-, 13C-NMR and Mass spectral analyses. The novel synthesized compounds were screened for their antifungal and antibacterial activities. Compounds 3, 6, 13 and 16 displayed the highest activity against Escherichia coli as revealed from the IC50 values (1.8-1.9 µg/mL). The compound 16 displayed a significant antifungal activity against Candia albicans (0.82 µg/mL), Aspergillus flavus (1.2 µg/mL) comparing to authentic antibiotics. From the TEM microgram, the compounds 3, 12, 13 and 16 exhibited a strong deformation to the cellular entities, by interfering with the cell membrane components, causing cytosol leakage, cellular shrinkage and irregularity to the cell shape. In addition, docking study for the most promising antimicrobial tested compounds depicted high binding affinity against acyl carrier protein domain from a fungal type I polyketide synthase (ACP), and Baumannii penicillin- binding protein (PBP). Moreover, compound 12 showed high drug- likeness, and excellent pharmacokinetics, which needs to be in focus for further antimicrobial drug development. The most promising antimicrobial compounds underwent theoretical investigation using DFT calculation.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemical synthesis , Imidazoles/chemistry , Uracil/chemistry , Xanthines/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/metabolism , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Binding Sites , Candida albicans/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA Gyrase/chemistry , DNA Gyrase/metabolism , Density Functional Theory , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Half-Life , Imidazoles/metabolism , Imidazoles/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Docking Simulation , Polyketide Synthases/chemistry , Polyketide Synthases/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Thermodynamics , Vero Cells
6.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470936

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is highly contagious to humans and has caused a pandemic of global proportions. Despite worldwide research efforts, efficient targeted therapies against the virus are still lacking. With the ready availability of the macromolecular structures of coronavirus and its known variants, the search for anti-SARS-CoV-2 therapeutics through in silico analysis has become a highly promising field of research. In this study, we investigate the inhibiting potentialities of triazole-based compounds against the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro). The SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) is known to play a prominent role in the processing of polyproteins that are translated from the viral RNA. Compounds were pre-screened from 171 candidates (collected from the DrugBank database). The results showed that four candidates (Bemcentinib, Bisoctrizole, PYIITM, and NIPFC) had high binding affinity values and had the potential to interrupt the main protease (Mpro) activities of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The pharmacokinetic parameters of these candidates were assessed and through molecular dynamic (MD) simulation their stability, interaction, and conformation were analyzed. In summary, this study identified the most suitable compounds for targeting Mpro, and we recommend using these compounds as potential drug molecules against SARS-CoV-2 after follow up studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Triazoles/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Benzocycloheptenes/chemistry , Benzocycloheptenes/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Databases, Chemical , Half-Life , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Protein Binding , Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Triazoles/metabolism , Triazoles/therapeutic use
7.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 87(21): e0137121, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470497

ABSTRACT

Phage Phi6 is an enveloped virus considered a possible nonpathogenic surrogate for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other viral pathogens in transmission studies. Larger input amounts of bacteriophage Phi6 are shown to delay and protect the phage from environmental decay, both when the phages are dried in plastic tubes and when they are stored in saline solution at 4°C. In contrast, when bacteriophage Phi6 is placed in LB (Luria-Bertani) growth medium (instead of saline) prior to placement on the plastic surface, the influence of the starting concentration on viral recovery is negligible. Protection is reflected in the phage half-lives at higher concentrations being longer than the half-lives at lower concentrations. Because experiments supporting the possibility of fomite transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses rely upon the survival of infectious virus following inoculation onto various surfaces, large initial amounts of input virus on a surface may generate artificially inflated survival times compared to realistic lower levels of virus that a subject would normally encounter. This is not only because there are extra half-lives to go through at higher concentrations but also because the half-lives themselves are extended at higher virus concentrations. It is important to design surface drying experiments for pathogens with realistic levels of input virus and to consider the role of the carrier and matrix if the results are to be clinically relevant. IMPORTANCE During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, much attention has been paid to the environmental decay of SARS-CoV-2 due to the proposed transmission of the virus via fomites. However, published experiments have commenced with inocula with very high virus titers, an experimental design not representative of real-life conditions. The study described here evaluated the impact of the initial virus titer on the environmental decay of an enveloped virus, using a nonpathogenic surrogate for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, enveloped bacteriophage Phi6. We establish that higher concentrations of virus can protect the virus from environmental decay, depending on conditions. This has important implications for stability studies of SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses. Our results point to a limitation in the fundamental methodology that has been used to attribute fomite transmission for almost all respiratory viruses.


Subject(s)
Bacteriophage phi 6 , Pseudomonas syringae/virology , Culture Media , Desiccation , Fomites/virology , Half-Life , Plastics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saline Solution , Temperature , Virus Inactivation
8.
Clin Immunol ; 232: 108871, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446516

ABSTRACT

Despite the burgeoning field of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) research, the persistence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) neutralising antibodies remains unclear. This study validated two high-throughput immunological methods for use as surrogate live virus neutralisation assays and employed them to examine the half-life of SARS-CoV-2 neutralising antibodies in convalescent plasma donations made by 42 repeat donors between April and September 2020. SARS-CoV-2 neutralising antibody titres decreased over time but typically remained above the methods' diagnostic cut-offs. Using this longitudinal data, the average half-life of SARS-CoV-2 neutralising antibodies was determined to be 20.4 days. SARS-CoV-2 neutralising antibody titres appear to persist in the majority of donors for several months. Whether these titres confer protection against re-infection requires further study and is of particular relevance as COVID-19 vaccines become widely available.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Blood Donors , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Half-Life , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma/immunology , Plasma/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
9.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 847-860, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387284

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm and multi-organ failure are the main causes of SARS-CoV-2-related death. However, the origin of excessive damages caused by SARS-CoV-2 remains largely unknown. Here we show that the SARS-CoV-2 envelope (2-E) protein alone is able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like damages in vitro and in vivo. 2-E proteins were found to form a type of pH-sensitive cation channels in bilayer lipid membranes. As observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, heterologous expression of 2-E channels induced rapid cell death in various susceptible cell types and robust secretion of cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. Intravenous administration of purified 2-E protein into mice caused ARDS-like pathological damages in lung and spleen. A dominant negative mutation lowering 2-E channel activity attenuated cell death and SARS-CoV-2 production. Newly identified channel inhibitors exhibited potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and excellent cell protective activity in vitro and these activities were positively correlated with inhibition of 2-E channel. Importantly, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of the channel inhibitor effectively reduced both the viral load and secretion of inflammation cytokines in lungs of SARS-CoV-2-infected transgenic mice expressing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE-2). Our study supports that 2-E is a promising drug target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Half-Life , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spleen/metabolism , Spleen/pathology , Viral Load , Virulence
11.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(2): 549-551, 2020 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389662

ABSTRACT

We modeled the stability of SARS-CoV-2 on personal protective equipment (PPE) commonly worn in hospitals when carrying out high-risk airway procedures. Evaluated PPE included the visors and hoods of two brands of commercially available powered air purifying respirators, a disposable face shield, and Tyvek coveralls. Following an exposure to 4.3 log10 plaque-forming units (PFUs) of SARS-CoV-2, all materials displayed a reduction in titer of > 4.2 log10 by 72 hours postexposure, with detectable titers at 72 hours varying by material (1.1-2.3 log10 PFU/mL). Our results highlight the need for proper doffing and disinfection of PPE, or disposal, to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 contact or fomite transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Gloves, Protective/virology , Microbial Viability , Personal Protective Equipment/virology , Respiratory Protective Devices/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , COVID-19/virology , Half-Life , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
13.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 59(45): 20154-20160, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384106

ABSTRACT

Phosphoramidates composed of an amino acid and a nucleotide analogue are critical metabolites of prodrugs, such as remdesivir. Hydrolysis of the phosphoramidate liberates the nucleotide, which can then be phosphorylated to become the pharmacologically active triphosphate. Enzymatic hydrolysis has been demonstrated, but a spontaneous chemical process may also occur. We measured the rate of enzyme-free hydrolysis for 17 phosphoramidates of ribonucleotides with amino acids or related compounds at pH 7.5. Phosphoramidates of proline hydrolyzed fast, with a half-life time as short as 2.4 h for Pro-AMP in ethylimidazole-containing buffer at 37 °C; 45-fold faster than Ala-AMP and 120-fold faster than Phe-AMP. Crystal structures of Gly-AMP, Pro-AMP, ßPro-AMP and Phe-AMP bound to RNase A as crystallization chaperone showed how well the carboxylate is poised to attack the phosphoramidate, helping to explain this reactivity. Our results are significant for the design of new antiviral prodrugs.


Subject(s)
Amides/metabolism , Amino Acids/chemistry , Nucleotides/metabolism , Phosphoric Acids/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Crystallography, X-Ray , Half-Life , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrolysis , Kinetics , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleotides/chemistry , Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Ribonuclease, Pancreatic/chemistry , Ribonuclease, Pancreatic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(17)2021 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376841

ABSTRACT

In recent years, enzymes have risen as promising therapeutic tools for different pathologies, from metabolic deficiencies, such as fibrosis conditions, ocular pathologies or joint problems, to cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Treatments based on the catalytic activity of enzymes are able to convert a wide range of target molecules to restore the correct physiological metabolism. These treatments present several advantages compared to established therapeutic approaches thanks to their affinity and specificity properties. However, enzymes present some challenges, such as short in vivo half-life, lack of targeted action and, in particular, patient immune system reaction against the enzyme. For this reason, it is important to monitor serum immune response during treatment. This can be achieved by conventional techniques (ELISA) but also by new promising tools such as microarrays. These assays have gained popularity due to their high-throughput analysis capacity, their simplicity, and their potential to monitor the immune response of patients during enzyme therapies. In this growing field, research is still ongoing to solve current health problems such as COVID-19. Currently, promising therapeutic alternatives using the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) are being studied to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Therapy/methods , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/pharmacology , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Drug Compounding/methods , Enzyme Stability , Enzyme Therapy/history , Enzyme Therapy/trends , Half-Life , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Treatment Outcome , Virus Internalization/drug effects
15.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(3): e853-e854, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343684

Subject(s)
Half-Life , Humans
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(12)2021 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273458

ABSTRACT

The marine carotenoids fucoxanthin and siphonaxanthin are powerful antioxidants that are attracting focused attention to identify a variety of health benefits and industry applications. In this study, the binding energy of these carotenoids with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike-glycoprotein was predicted by molecular docking simulation, and their inhibitory activity was confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus on HEK293 cells overexpressing angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Siphonaxanthin from Codium fragile showed significant antiviral activity with an IC50 of 87.4 µM against SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus entry, while fucoxanthin from Undaria pinnatifida sporophyll did not. The acute toxicities were predicted to be relatively low, and pharmacokinetic predictions indicate GI absorption. Although further studies are needed to elucidate the inhibition of viral infection by siphonaxanthin, these results provide useful information in the application of these marine carotenoids for the treatment and prevention of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Xanthophylls/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorophyta/chemistry , Chlorophyta/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Half-Life , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Phaeophyta/chemistry , Phaeophyta/metabolism , Rats , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Xanthophylls/metabolism , Xanthophylls/pharmacology , Xanthophylls/therapeutic use
17.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 847-860, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265947

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm and multi-organ failure are the main causes of SARS-CoV-2-related death. However, the origin of excessive damages caused by SARS-CoV-2 remains largely unknown. Here we show that the SARS-CoV-2 envelope (2-E) protein alone is able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like damages in vitro and in vivo. 2-E proteins were found to form a type of pH-sensitive cation channels in bilayer lipid membranes. As observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, heterologous expression of 2-E channels induced rapid cell death in various susceptible cell types and robust secretion of cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. Intravenous administration of purified 2-E protein into mice caused ARDS-like pathological damages in lung and spleen. A dominant negative mutation lowering 2-E channel activity attenuated cell death and SARS-CoV-2 production. Newly identified channel inhibitors exhibited potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and excellent cell protective activity in vitro and these activities were positively correlated with inhibition of 2-E channel. Importantly, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of the channel inhibitor effectively reduced both the viral load and secretion of inflammation cytokines in lungs of SARS-CoV-2-infected transgenic mice expressing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE-2). Our study supports that 2-E is a promising drug target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Half-Life , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spleen/metabolism , Spleen/pathology , Viral Load , Virulence
18.
Bioorg Chem ; 112: 104967, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213051

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, over 200 countries face a wellbeing emergency because of epidemiological disease COVID-19 caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. It will cause a very high effect on the world's economy and the worldwide health sector. The present work is an investigation of the newly synthesized 4-benzyl-1-(2,4,6-trimethyl-benzyl)-piperidine (M1BZP) molecule's inhibitory potential against important protein targets of SARS-CoV-2 using computational approaches. M1BZP crystallizes in monoclinic type with P1211 space group. For the title compound M1BZP, spectroscopic characterization like 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, were carried out. The geometry of the compound had been optimized by the DFT method and its results were compared with the X-ray diffraction data. The calculated energies for the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) showed the stability and reactivity of the title compound. Intermolecular interactions in the crystal network were determined using Hirshfeld surface analyses. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) picture was drawn using the same level of theory to visualize the chemical reactivity and charge distribution on the molecule. Molecular docking study performed for the synthesized compound revealed an efficient interaction with the COVID-19 protease and resulted in good activities. We hope the present study would help workers in the field to develop potential vaccines and therapeutics against the novel coronavirus. Virtual ADME studies were carried out as well and a relationship between biological, electronic, and physicochemical qualifications of the target compound was determined. Toxicity prediction by computational technique for the title compound was also carried out.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Piperidines/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Crystallography, X-Ray , Density Functional Theory , Half-Life , Humans , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Docking Simulation , Piperidines/chemical synthesis , Piperidines/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Matrix Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism
20.
Clin Pharmacokinet ; 60(5): 569-583, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157031

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir (RDV, Veklury®) is a once-daily, nucleoside ribonucleic acid polymerase inhibitor of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 replication. Remdesivir has been granted approvals in several countries for use in adults and children hospitalized with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Inside the cell, remdesivir undergoes metabolic activation to form the intracellular active triphosphate metabolite, GS-443902 (detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells), and ultimately, the renally eliminated plasma metabolite GS-441524. This review discusses the pre-clinical pharmacology of RDV, clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics/concentration-QT analysis, rationale for dose selection for treatment of patients with COVID-19, and drug-drug interaction potential based on available in vitro and clinical data in healthy volunteers. Following single-dose intravenous administration over 2 h of an RDV solution formulation across the dose range of 3-225 mg in healthy participants, RDV and its metabolites (GS-704277and GS-441524) exhibit linear pharmacokinetics. Following multiple doses of RDV 150 mg once daily for 7 or 14 days, major metabolite GS-441524 accumulates approximately 1.9-fold in plasma. Based on pharmacokinetic bridging from animal data and available human data in healthy volunteers, the RDV clinical dose regimen of a 200-mg loading dose on day 1 followed by 100-mg maintenance doses for 4 or 9 days was selected for further evaluation of pharmacokinetics and safety. Results showed high intracellular concentrations of GS-443902 suggestive of efficient conversion from RDV into the triphosphate form, and further supporting this clinical dosing regimen for the treatment of COVID-19. Mathematical drug-drug interaction liability predictions, based on in vitro and phase I data, suggest RDV has low potential for drug-drug interactions, as the impact of inducers or inhibitors on RDV disposition is minimized by the parenteral route of administration and extensive extraction. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, RDV is not predicted to be a clinically significant inhibitor of drug-metabolizing enzymes or transporters in patients infected with COVID-19 at therapeutic RDV doses.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacokinetics , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Alanine/pharmacokinetics , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Area Under Curve , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Interactions , Furans/metabolism , Half-Life , Humans , Metabolic Clearance Rate , Pyrroles/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Triazines/metabolism
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