Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 33
Filter
1.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(2): 961-965, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the spreading of SARS-CoV-2 from China, all deferrable medical activities have been suspended, to redirect resources for the management of COVID patients. The goal of this retrospective study was to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on head and neck cancers' diagnosis in our Academic Hospital. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patients treated for head and neck cancers between March 12 and November 1, 2020 was carried out, and we compared these data with the diagnoses of the same periods of the 5 previous years. RESULTS: 47 patients were included in this study. We observed a significative reduction in comparison with the same period of the previous 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with a decrease in the number of new H&N cancers diagnoses, and a substantial diagnostic delay can be attributable to COVID-19 control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Delayed Diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Healthcare , Time-to-Treatment
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(1): 284-290, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630130

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic and the measures accompanying it have been accused of having a negative influence on the frequency and methods of treatment of various diseases including head and neck cancer (HNSCC). To go further into this assumption, the diagnoses made, and treatments performed at one of Germany's largest head and neck cancer centres were evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study consisted of one single centre and involved a retrospective review of all patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent HNSCC. The diagnosis and treatment methods used in the pre-COVID-19 time period between March 1st, 2019, and March 1st, 2020, were analysed and compared with the COVID-19 time period from April 1st, 2020, until April 1st, 2021. The primary objective was defined as the number of malignant diagnoses and the secondary objectives as the disease stage and the time to therapy. RESULTS: A total of 612 patients (160♀; mean 63 yrs.) were included. 319 patients (52%) were treated in the pre-COVID-19 time. The two groups did not differ in terms of age (p=0.304), gender (p=0.941), presence of recurrent disease (p=0.866), tumour subsite (p=0.194) or the duration from presentation to the multidisciplinary tumour board until start of therapy (p=0.202). There were no significant differences in the T stage (p=0.777), N stage (p=0.067) or UICC stage (p=0.922). During the pre-COVID-19 period more patients presented with distant metastases (n= 23 vs. n=8; p=0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that there was no significant change in either the number and severity of HNSCC diagnoses or the time until start of therapy at this large head and neck cancer centre as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cancer Care Facilities , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Female , Germany , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck , Young Adult
3.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103302, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565516

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We aim to investigate the true benefits of free individual HNC screening in a high-risk urban population as well as the associated risks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective descriptive study. Free HNC screening was performed from 2014 to 2019. Participants were issued a questionnaire at the time of screening. After exemption by the Institutional Review Board, completed screening questionnaires were entered into a database and descriptive statistics were generated. The primary outcome measure for this study was the detection rate for HNC. We hypothesized that screening would be low yield based on previous studies (Gogarty et al., 2016). RESULTS: This was a volunteer sample with a total of 410 participants, and the highest yield screening year was 2019 (n = 187). For all years, the cancer detection rate was 0%. In 2019, 134 (77.9%) of participants did not recognize the early symptoms of HNC, and 120 (73.2%) reported the screening program increased their awareness of the disease. 13 (7.6%) reported HPV vaccination while 126 (71.2%) were unaware that HPV has been linked with head and neck cancer. CONCLUSIONS: HNC screening is an excellent opportunity for education regarding HNC risk factors. However, it is not a cost-effective use of physician time, does not increase detection rates even in high-risk segments of the general population, and is not completely without risk in the context of COVID-19. Perhaps the focus of HNC screening should shift from individualized screening to education and health promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(2): 1111-1115, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474004

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, otolaryngology departments across the United Kingdom have adopted non-face-to-face clinics with consultations being carried out remotely, via telephone or video calls. By reducing footfall on hospital sites, the aim of this strategy was to limit direct contact and curb the spread of infection. This report outlines our experience of conducting a telephone triage clinic in the assessment of urgent suspected head and neck cancer referrals during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: New patients who were referred on the urgent suspected head and neck cancer pathway were prospectively identified between 1 May 2020 and 31 August 2020. Patients were triaged remotely using telephone consultations. Risk stratification was performed using the 'Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator' (HaNC-RC v.2). RESULTS: Four-hundred and twelve patients were triaged remotely during the 4-month study period. Of these, 248 patients were deemed 'low risk' (60.2%), 78 were classed as 'moderate risk' (18.9%) and 86 were considered 'high risk' (20.9%) according to the HaNC-RC v.2 risk score. Twenty-four patients who were assessed during the study period were diagnosed with head and neck cancer (5.82%). CONCLUSION: The use of teleconsultation, supported by a validated, symptom-based risk calculator, has the potential to provide a viable and effective adjunct in the assessment and management of new suspected head and neck cancer patients and should be considered as part of the inherent re-shaping of clinical service delivery following the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Remote Consultation , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
5.
Cancer ; 127(22): 4177-4189, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363649

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Remote triage for suspected head and neck cancer (HNC) referrals was adopted by many institutions during the initial peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Its safety in this population has not been established. METHODS: A 16-week, prospective, multicenter national service evaluation was started on March 23, 2020. Suspected HNC referrals undergoing remote triage in UK secondary care centers were identified and followed up for a minimum of 6 months to record the cancer status. Triage was supported by risk stratification using a validated calculator. RESULTS: Data for 4568 cases were submitted by 41 centers serving a population of approximately 26 million. These represented 14.1% of the predicted maximum referrals for this population outside of pandemic times, and this gave the study a margin of error of 1.34% at 95% confidence. Completed 6-month follow-up data were available for 99.8% with an overall cancer rate of 5.6% (254 of 4557). The rates of triage were as follows: urgent imaging investigation, 25.4% (n = 1156); urgent face-to-face review, 27.8%; (n = 1268); assessment deferral, 30.3% (n = 1382); and discharge, 16.4% (n = 749). The corresponding missed cancers rates were 0.5% (5 of 1048), 0.3% (3 of 1149), 0.9% (12 of 1382), and 0.9% (7 of 747; P = .15). The negative predictive value for a nonurgent triage outcome and no cancer diagnosis was 99.1%. Overall harm was reported in 0.24% (11 of 4557) and was highest for deferred assessments (0.58%; 8 of 1382). CONCLUSIONS: Remote triage, incorporating risk stratification, may facilitate targeted investigations for higher risk patients and prevent unnecessary hospital attendance for lower risk patients. The risk of harm is low and may be reduced further with appropriate safety netting of deferred appointments. LAY SUMMARY: This large national study observed the widespread adoption of telephone assessment (supported by a risk calculator) of patients referred to hospital specialists with suspected head and neck cancer during the initial peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The authors identified 4568 patients from 41 UK centers (serving a population of more than 26 million people) who were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. Late cancers were identified, whether reviewed or investigated urgently (0.4%) or nonurgently (0.9%), but the overall rate of harm was low (0.2%), with the highest rate being seen with deferred appointments (0.6%).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Remote Consultation/methods , Triage/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , Remote Consultation/standards , Risk Assessment/methods , Triage/standards , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 54: 151800, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Challenging emerging entities with distinctive molecular signatures may benefit from algorithms for diagnostic work-up. METHODS: Fusion sarcomas (2020-2021, during pandemic) were diagnosed by clinicoradiology, morphology, phenotype, and next-generation sequencing (NGS). RESULTS: Six fusion sarcomas in two males and four females involved the chest-wall, neck, or extremities; ages ranged 2-73, median 18 years. Sizes ranged 5.3-25.0, median 9.1 cm. These include high grade 1) TPR-NTRK1 of proximal femur with a larger rounded soft tissue mass, previously considered osteosarcoma yet without convincing tumor matrix. A pathologic fracture necessitated emergency hemipelvectomy (NED) and 2) novel KANK1-NTRK2 sarcoma of bone and soft tissue with spindled pleomorphic to epithelioid features (AWD metastases). 3) Novel ERC1-ALK unaligned fusion, a low grade infiltrative deep soft tissue hand sarcoma with prominent-vascularity, myopericytoid/lipofibromatosis-like ovoid cells, and collagenized stroma, was successfully treated with ALK-inhibitor (Crizotinib), avoiding amputation. These NTRK and ALK tumors variably express S100 and CD34 and were negative for SOX10. 4) and 5) CIC-DUX4 round cell tumors (rapid metastases/demise), one with COVID superinfection, were previously treated as Ewing sarcoma. These demonstrated mild pleomorphism and necrosis, variable myxoid change and CD99 reactivity, and a distinctive dot-like-Golgi WT1 immunostaining pattern. 6) A chest wall/thoracic round cell sarcoma, focal CD34/ keratins/CK7, revealed nuclear-STAT6, STAT6-NAB2 by NGS, confirming malignant solitary fibrous tumor, intermediate-risk-stratification (AWD metastases). CONCLUSIONS: Recent fusion sarcomas include new KANK1-NTRK2 and ERC1-ALK, the latter successfully treated by targeted-therapy. ALK/NTRK fusion partners TPR and KANK1 suggest unusual high-grade morphology/behavior. Clinicoradiologic, morphologic, and phenotypic algorithms can prompt molecular-targeted immunostains or NGS for final classification and promising inhibitor therapy.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Femoral Neoplasms/genetics , Gene Fusion , Head and Neck Neoplasms/genetics , Sarcoma/genetics , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/genetics , Thoracic Neoplasms/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Algorithms , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Extremities/pathology , Female , Femoral Neoplasms/diagnosis , Femoral Neoplasms/drug therapy , Femoral Neoplasms/pathology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/drug therapy , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Grading , Phenotype , Prognosis , Sarcoma/diagnosis , Sarcoma/drug therapy , Sarcoma/pathology , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/diagnosis , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/drug therapy , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/pathology , Thoracic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Thoracic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Thoracic Wall/pathology , Young Adult
7.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(3): 248-251, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279750

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 extends far beyond the immediate burden on healthcare systems caused by hospitalisation of patients with the disease itself. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on the referral rate of patients to the suspected head and neck cancer two-week-wait clinic. METHODS: A multicentre retrospective study was performed investigating data collected for all patients attending the suspected head and neck cancer two-week-wait clinic in ENT departments in the West Midlands. RESULTS: A total of 509 fast-track referrals were received from February to April in 2019, compared to 399 referrals in 2020. April 2020 saw a 62.4 per cent reduction in referral rate compared to April 2019. CONCLUSION: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has resulted in changes to health-seeking behaviours, and healthcare provision and delivery. Urgent policy interventions may be required to compensate for the hidden impact that the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has had on those with cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , United Kingdom
8.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: 1-11, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166954

ABSTRACT

The overwhelming majority of head and neck cancers and related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, which have challenges related to burden of disease versus access to care. Yet the additional health care burden of the COVID-19 pandemic has also impacted access to care for patients with head and neck cancer in the United States. This article focuses on challenges and innovation in prioritizing head and neck cancer care in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indian experience of value-added head and neck cancer care in busy and densely populated regions, and strategies to optimize the management of head and neck cancer in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Medical Oncology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality , Health Priorities , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Needs Assessment , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 344-347, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study aimed to evaluate possible diagnostic delays in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma recurrences due to the changed follow-up protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The follow-up appointments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated more than one year prior to the pandemic were changed to telephone appointments in order to reduce physical visits to the hospital. All contacts, reasons for contact and recurrent cancers were recorded. RESULTS: There were 17 recurrences during a seven-month study period among 178 patients treated in the previous year (10 per cent); 14 of these recurrences occurred in patients whose treatment had ended less than one year previously and 3 occurred more than one year after treatment had ended. There was no delay in diagnoses of recurrent tumours or treatment despite reduced visits because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. CONCLUSION: According to our analyses, no delay was caused in the diagnoses of recurrent diseases. Follow up by telephone or telemedicine can be considered as part of the follow-up protocol one year after the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma when necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Finland/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
11.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 241-245, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Utilisation of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 has been recommended during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for the assessment of head and neck cancer referrals. As limited data were available, this study was conducted to analyse the use of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 in clinical practice. METHOD: Patients undergoing telephone triage in a two-week wait referral clinic were included. Data were collected and analysed using appropriate methods. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients in the study were risk-stratified into low-risk (51.6 per cent, 33 of 64), moderate-risk (14.1 per cent, 9 of 64) and high-risk (34.4 per cent, 22 of 64) groups. Of the patients, 53.1 per cent (34 of 64) avoided an urgent hospital visit, and 96.9 per cent (62 of 64) were cancer free, while 3.1 per cent (2 of 64) were found to have a head and neck malignancy. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy were 50.00 per cent, 66.13 per cent, 99.92 per cent and 66.11 per cent, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to use the calculator for triaging purposes, but it must always be accompanied by a meticulous clinical thought process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Sensitivity and Specificity , Telephone , Time Factors , United Kingdom
12.
Head Neck ; 43(6): 1890-1897, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to COVID-19, diagnostic delays and a surge of advanced head and neck cancer (HNC) is anticipated. We hereby evaluate patient and tumor characteristics before and during the early COVID-19 period. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients with HNC presented at a multidisciplinary tumor conference from May 14, 2020 to June 18, 2020 was performed and compared to a similar 6-week period a year before. Demographics, time to diagnosis, and tumor characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: There was a 25% reduction in newly diagnosed malignancies. Groups were similar in baseline characteristics, duration of symptoms, and time to diagnosis. However, median primary tumor size was significantly larger (p = 0.042) and T stage more advanced for mucosal subsites (p = 0.025) in the COVID-19 group. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest increased tumor burden in patients with HNC presenting during the pandemic, despite a similar time to diagnosis. This may become more pronounced as the pandemic duration is extended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(1): e2034065, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049541

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to treatment delays for many patients with cancer. While published guidelines provide suggestions on which cases are appropriate for treatment delay, there are no good quantitative estimates on the association of delays with tumor control or risk of new metastases. Objectives: To develop a simplified mathematical model of tumor growth, control, and new metastases for cancers with varying doubling times and metastatic potential and to estimate tumor control probability (TCP) and metastases risk as a function of treatment delay interval. Design, Setting, and Participants: This decision analytical model describes a quantitative model for 3 tumors (ie, head and neck, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers). Using accepted ranges of tumor doubling times and metastatic development from the clinical literature from 2001 to 2020, estimates of tumor growth, TCP, and new metastases were analyzed for various treatment delay intervals. Main Outcomes and Measures: Risk estimates for potential decreases in local TCP and increases in new metastases with each interval of treatment delay. Results: For fast-growing head and neck tumors with a 2-month treatment delay, there was an estimated 4.8% (95% CI, 3.4%-6.4%) increase in local tumor control risk and a 0.49% (0.47%-0.51%) increase in new distal metastases risk. A 6-month delay was associated with an estimated 21.3% (13.4-30.4) increase in local tumor control risk and a 6.0% (5.2-6.8) increase in distal metastases risk. For intermediate-growing colorectal tumors, there was a 2.1% (0.7%-3.5%) increase in local tumor control risk and a 2.7% (2.6%-2.8%) increase in distal metastases risk at 2 months and a 7.6% (2.2%-14.2%) increase in local tumor control risk and a 24.7% (21.9%-27.8%) increase in distal metastases risk at 6 months. For slower-growing lung tumors, there was a 1.2% (0.0%-2.8%) increase in local tumor control risk and a 0.19% (0.18%-0.20%) increase in distal metastases risk at 2 months, and a 4.3% (0.0%-10.6%) increase in local tumor control risk and a 1.9% (1.6%-2.2%) increase in distal metastases risk at 6 months. Conclusions and Relevance: This study proposed a model to quantify the association of treatment delays with local tumor control and risk of new metastases. The detrimental associations were greatest for tumors with faster rates of proliferation and metastasis. The associations were smaller, but still substantial, for slower-growing tumors.


Subject(s)
Decision Support Techniques , Models, Theoretical , Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 53(6): 1159-1170, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027957

ABSTRACT

This review explores the changes to practice associated with COVID-19 for providers treating patients with head and neck cancer and laryngeal pathology. The aim of the review is to highlight some of the challenges and considerations associated with treating this patient population during the pandemic. Additionally, it seeks to discuss some of the areas of concern related to ramping up clinical volume.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Laryngectomy/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Laryngectomy/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Safety Management , Telemedicine/methods , United States
15.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 20(1): 209, 2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the whole world is experiencing the cascading effect of a new pandemic, almost every aspect of modern life has been disrupted. Because of health emergencies during this period, widespread fear has resulted in compromised patient safety, especially for patients with cancer. It is very challenging to treat such cancer patients because of the complexity of providing care and treatment, along with COVID-19. Hence, an effective treatment comparison strategy is needed. We need to have a handy tool to understand cancer progression in this unprecedented scenario. Linking different events of cancer progression is the need of the hour. It is a huge challenge for the development of new methodology. METHODS: This article explores the time lag effect and makes a statistical inference about the best experimental arm using Accelerated Failure Time (AFT) model and regression methods. The work is presented as the occurrence of other events as a hazard rate after the first event (relapse). The time lag effect between the events is linked and analysed. RESULTS: The results were presented as a comprehensive analytical strategy by joining all disease progression. An AFT model applied with the transition states, and the dependency structure between the gap times was used by the auto-regression model. The effects of arms were compared using the coefficient of auto-regression and accelerated failure time (AFT) models. CONCLUSIONS: We provide the solutions to overcome the issue with intervals between two consecutive events in motivating head and neck cancer (HNC) data. COVID-19 is not going to leave us soon. We have to conduct several cancer clinical trials in the presence of COVID-19. A comprehensive analytical strategy to analyse cancer clinical trial data during COVID-19 pandemic is presented.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/methods , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Bayes Theorem , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Progression , Head and Neck Neoplasms/complications , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Markov Chains , Monte Carlo Method , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(13): 7516-7518, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676622

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 is having a dramatic effect on most medical disciplines. Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is one of the most engaged disciplines, and otolaryngology specialists are facing a radical change of their role and daily activities that will have severe impact on the return to the ordinary. In this paper, the COVID-19 Task Force of the Young Otolaryngologists of the Italian Society of Otolaryngology comment on the changes that occurred for otolaryngology in Italy during the pandemic. Changes include organizational rearrangement of Otolaryngology Units, with merges and closures that affected a significant portion of them; reallocation of otolaryngology personnel, mainly to COVID-19 wards; reduction of elective clinical and surgical activity, that was mainly limited to oncology and emergency procedures; and execution of screening procedures for SARS-CoV-2 among healthcare providers and patients in otolaryngology units in Italy.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Otolaryngologists/organization & administration , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Italy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1507-1515, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614117

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has altered the health care environment for the management of head and neck cancers. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction during the pandemic for rational Head and Neck Cancer management in order to achieve a medically and ethically appropriate balance of risks and benefits. METHODS: Creation of consensus document. RESULTS: The process yielded a consensus statement among a wide range of practitioners involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer in a multihospital tertiary care health system. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines support an ethical approach for the management of head and neck cancers during the COVID-19 epidemic consistent with both the local standard of care as well as the head and neck oncological literature.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Multi-Institutional Systems , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Palliative Care/standards , Patient Safety , Pennsylvania , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/standards , Tertiary Care Centers
18.
Lancet Oncol ; 21(7): e350-e359, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593280

ABSTRACT

The speed and scale of the global COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented pressures on health services worldwide, requiring new methods of service delivery during the health crisis. In the setting of severe resource constraint and high risk of infection to patients and clinicians, there is an urgent need to identify consensus statements on head and neck surgical oncology practice. We completed a modified Delphi consensus process of three rounds with 40 international experts in head and neck cancer surgical, radiation, and medical oncology, representing 35 international professional societies and national clinical trial groups. Endorsed by 39 societies and professional bodies, these consensus practice recommendations aim to decrease inconsistency of practice, reduce uncertainty in care, and provide reassurance for clinicians worldwide for head and neck surgical oncology in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and in the setting of acute severe resource constraint and high risk of infection to patients and staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Health Care Rationing , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Surgical Oncology/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , International Cooperation , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration
19.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(3): 447-454, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459019

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused physicians and surgeons to consider restructuring traditional cancer management paradigms. We aim to review the current evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer, with an emphasis on the role of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) during a pandemic. DATA SOURCES: COVID-19 resources from PubMed, Google Scholar, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and the American Head and Neck Society were examined. REVIEW METHODS: Studies and guidelines related to the multidisciplinary management of head and neck cancer in the COVID-19 setting were reviewed. A total of 54 studies were included. Given the continuously evolving body of literature, the sources cited include the latest statements from medical and dental societies. RESULTS: The unpredictable fluctuation of hospital resources and the risk of the nosocomial spread of SARS-CoV-2 have direct effects on head and neck cancer management. Using an MDT approach to help define "essential surgery" for immediately life- or function-threatening disease processes in the context of available hospital resources will help to maximize outcomes. Early enrollment in an MDT is often critical for considering nonsurgical options to protect patients and health care workers. The role of the MDT continues after cancer treatment, if delivered, and the MDT plays an essential role in surveillance and survivorship programs in these challenging times. CONCLUSION: Head and neck cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic poses a unique challenge for all specialists involved. Early MDT involvement is important to maximize patient outcomes and satisfaction in the context of public and community safety.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1674-1680, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outpatient telemedicine consultations are being adopted to triage patients for head and neck cancer. However, there is currently no established structure to frame this consultation. METHODS: For suspected referrals with cancer, we adapted the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator (HaNC-RC)-V.2, generated from 10 244 referrals with the following diagnostic efficacy metrics: 85% sensitivity, 98.6% negative predictive value, and area under the curve of 0.89. For follow-up patients, a symptom inventory generated from 5123 follow-up consultations was used. A customized Excel Data Tool was created, trialed across professional groups and made freely available for download at www.entintegrate.co.uk/entuk2wwtt, alongside a user guide, protocol, and registration link for the project. Stakeholder support was obtained from national bodies. RESULTS: No remote consultations were refused by patients. Preliminary data from 511 triaging episodes at 13 centers show that 77.1% of patients were discharged directly or have had their appointments deferred. DISCUSSION: Significant reduction in footfall can be achieved using a structured triaging system. Further refinement of HaNC-RC-V.2 is feasible and the authors welcome international collaboration.


Subject(s)
Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation , Risk Assessment/methods , Triage/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Remote Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment , United Kingdom/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL