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1.
Head Face Med ; 19(1): 19, 2023 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is evidence of the occurrence of headache after vaccination against COVID-19. However, only a few studies have examined the headache characteristics and related determinants, especially among healthcare workers with a history of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: We evaluated the incidence of headaches after injection of different types of COVID-19 vaccine to determine factors relating to the incidence of headache after vaccination among the Iranian healthcare workers who had previously contracted COVID-19. A group of 334 healthcare workers with a history of COVID-19 infection were included and vaccinated (at least one month after recovery without any COVID-19 related symptoms) with different COVID-19 vaccines. The baseline information, headache characteristics and vaccine specifications were recorded. RESULTS: Overall, 39.2% reported experiencing a post-vaccination headache. Of those with a previous history of headache, 51.1% reported migraine-type, 27.4% tension-type and 21.5% other types. The mean time between vaccination and headache appearance was 26.78 ± 6.93 h, with the headache appearing less than 24 h after vaccination in most patients (83.2%). The headaches reached its peak within 8.62 ± 2.41 h. Most patients reported a compression-type headache. The prevalence of post-vaccination headaches was significantly different according to the type of vaccine used. The highest rates were reported for AstraZeneca, followed by Sputnik V. In regression analysis, the vaccine brand, female gender and initial COVID-19 severity were the main determinants for predicting post-vaccination headache. CONCLUSION: Participants commonly experienced a headache following vaccination against COVID-19. Our study results indicated that this was slightly more common in females and in those with a history of severe COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Iran/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Health Personnel
2.
Acta Neurol Taiwan ; 32(2): 57-64, 2023 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), health care workers (HCWs) are at very high risk. Personal protective equipment (PPE) and masks are not only difficult to wear while working but also causes various complications. The present self-administered questionnaire- based study aimed to explore the headache and complications in HCWs on wearing PPE during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The present study was performed by obtaining a self-administered questionnaire from HCWs, which provides evidence of various complications due to the use of a PPE and mask. RESULTS: Out of a total of 329 respondents, 189(57.45%), 67(20.36%), 238(72.34%), 213(64.74%), 177(53.80%), and 34(10.33%) reported headache, breathlessness, suffocation, nose pain, ear pain, and leg pain respectively. Out of 329 respondents, 47(14.29%) had pre-existing headaches. Headache was significantly high for those who wore PPE for 4-6h (121/133; 87.05%) than that of those who wore up to 4h (18/26; 69.23%). Of the 34(24.46%) required medication who reported headaches wearing PPE. Acetaminophen is quite helpful in most health care workers to decrease headaches. Nose-related complications occur frequently in health care workers after regular shifts for more than 6 days. Gelatinous adhesives patch was a wonderful prophylactic remedy as it was helpful to prevent nose- related complications in 24 HCWs out of 25(96%). CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the HCWs reported headache, suffocation, nose pain, and ear pain. Duration of PPE use of more than 4h is significantly associated with headache. Short duration PPE use prevent HCWs from headache and various ill effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Asphyxia/complications , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology
3.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 36(3): 168-174, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304566

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This is an expert overview on recent literature about the complex relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and headache. RECENT FINDINGS: Long COVID is a clinical syndrome characterized by the presence of persistent symptoms following the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Headache is one of the most common symptoms and is described most often as throbbing pain, associated with photo and phonofobia and worsening with physical exercise. In acute COVID-19, headache is usually described as moderate or severe, diffuse and oppressive although sometimes it has been described with a migraine-like phenotype, especially in patients with a previous history of migraine. Headache intensity during acute phase seems to be the most important predictor of duration of headache over time. Some COVID-19 cases can be associated with cerebrovascular complications, and red flags of secondary headaches (e.g. new worsening or unresponsive headache, or new onset of neurological focal signs) should be urgently investigated with imaging. Treatment goals are the reduction of number and intensity of headache crises, and the prevention of chronic forms. SUMMARY: This review can help clinicians to approach patients with headache and infection from SARS-CoV-2, with particular attention to persistent headache in long COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Migraine Disorders/complications
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304542

ABSTRACT

Migraines, a chronic disease, can be debilitating in university students, affecting their academic performance, attendance, and social interactions. The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of COVID-19 on the role functioning and perceived stress levels of students suffering from migraine-like headaches. METHODS: Two identical cross-sectional surveys were sent to students in Fall 2019 and Spring 2021 at a mid-sized university in the U.S. The students were queried on the headache impact scale (HIT-6) and perceived stress scale (PSS-10). Associations between the migraine-like headaches, severity of the headaches, stress levels, and headache impacts on the individuals' role functioning were analyzed. RESULTS: The average age of the respondents (n = 721) was 20.81 ± 4.32 years in 2019 and (n = 520) 20.95 ± 3.19 years in 2021. A difference (p = 0.044) was found in the HIT-6 score <49 category. The other categories of the HIT-6 and the PSS-10 were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19, more students answered that their migraine-like headaches had lower impacts on their role functioning, thus suggesting that the students were having less severe migraines. A trend was seen for student's stress levels, indicating a decrease from 2019 to 2021. Furthermore, our results showed that the impact of headaches and stress levels slightly declined throughout the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Students , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
5.
Drug Saf ; 46(6): 575-585, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The European Medicine Agency extended the use of Comirnaty, Spikevax, and Nuvaxovid in paediatrics; thus, these vaccines require additional real-world safety evidence. Herein, we aimed to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines through Covid-19 Vaccine Monitor (CVM) and EudraVigilance surveillance systems and the published pivotal clinical trials. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of vaccinees aged between 5 and 17 years, we measured the frequency of commonly reported (local/systemic solicited) and serious adverse drug events (ADRs) following the first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines in Europe using data from the CVM cohort until April 2022. The results of previous pivotal clinical trials and data in the EudraVigilance were also analysed. RESULTS: The CVM study enrolled 658 first-dose vaccinees (children aged 5-11 years; n = 250 and adolescents aged 12-17 years; n = 408). Local/systemic solicited ADRs were common, whereas serious ADRs were uncommon. Among Comirnaty first and second dose recipients, 28.8% and 17.1% of children and 54.2% and 52.2% of adolescents experienced at least one ADR, respectively; injection-site pain (29.2% and 20.7%), fatigue (16.1% and 12.8%), and headache (22.1% and 19.3%) were the most frequent local and systemic ADRs. Results were consistent but slightly lower than in pivotal clinical trials. Reporting rates in Eudravigilance were lower by a factor of 1000. CONCLUSIONS: The CVM study showed high frequencies of local solicited reactions after vaccination but lower rates than in pivotal clinical trials. Injection-site pain, fatigue, and headache were the most commonly reported ADRs for clinical trials, but higher than spontaneously reported data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , BNT162 Vaccine , Prospective Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/epidemiology , Pain , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Fatigue
6.
J Headache Pain ; 24(1): 24, 2023 Mar 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260367

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headaches are frequent neurological disorders that are yet to be unveiled and treated comprehensively worldwide. Bearing in mind that the distribution of headache subtypes in neurology clinics (NC) is essential for planning appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, the primary goals of this multi-centric study are to carry out inter-regional comparisons by using current diagnostic criteria with evaluations of neurologists to delineate headache burden. METHODS: A cross-sectional study between April 1 and May 16, 2022 was conducted with the participation of 13 countries from the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Patients were included in the study on a specific day each week during five consecutive weeks. All volunteers over the age of 18 and whose primary cause for admission was headache were examined. The patients admitted to NC or referred from emergency services/other services were evaluated by neurologists by means of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3) criteria. RESULTS: Among the 13,794 patients encountered in NC, headache was the primary complaint in 30.04%. The headache patients' mean age was 42.85 ± 14.89 (18-95 years), and 74.3% were female. According to the ICHD-3 criteria, 86.7% of the main group had primary headache disorders, 33.5% had secondary headaches, 4% had painful cranial neuropathies along with other facial and headaches, and 5.2% had headaches included in the appendix part showing some overlapping conditions. While the most common primary headache was migraine without aura (36.8%), the most common secondary headache was medication-overuse headache (MOH) (9.8%). Headaches attributed to COVID-19, its secondary complications, or vaccines continue to occur at rates of 1.2%-3.5% in current neurology practice. Pain severity was significantly lower in Ivory Coast and Sudan than in Türkiye, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, Iran, Egypt, Senegal, Tatarstan, and Azerbaijan (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that migraine is still the most common motive for admissions to NC in different regions. Furthermore, MOH, an avoidable disorder, is the most common secondary headache type and appears to be a significant problem in all regions. Remarkably, pain perception differs between regions, and pain intensity is lower in Africa than in other regions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache Disorders, Secondary , Headache Disorders , Migraine Disorders , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/complications , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Headache Disorders/epidemiology , Headache Disorders/therapy , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Asia , Headache Disorders, Secondary/diagnosis , Middle East/epidemiology , Africa/epidemiology , Hospitals
7.
J Gen Intern Med ; 38(5): 1127-1136, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Compared to white individuals, Black and Hispanic individuals have higher rates of COVID-19 hospitalization and death. Less is known about racial/ethnic differences in post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). OBJECTIVE: Examine racial/ethnic differences in potential PASC symptoms and conditions among hospitalized and non-hospitalized COVID-19 patients. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using data from electronic health records. PARTICIPANTS: 62,339 patients with COVID-19 and 247,881 patients without COVID-19 in New York City between March 2020 and October 2021. MAIN MEASURES: New symptoms and conditions 31-180 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. KEY RESULTS: The final study population included 29,331 white patients (47.1%), 12,638 Black patients (20.3%), and 20,370 Hispanic patients (32.7%) diagnosed with COVID-19. After adjusting for confounders, significant racial/ethnic differences in incident symptoms and conditions existed among both hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. For example, 31-180 days after a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, hospitalized Black patients had higher odds of being diagnosed with diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50-2.56, q<0.001) and headaches (OR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.11-2.08, q=0.02), compared to hospitalized white patients. Hospitalized Hispanic patients had higher odds of headaches (OR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.21-2.17, q=0.003) and dyspnea (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.05-1.42, q=0.02), compared to hospitalized white patients. Among non-hospitalized patients, Black patients had higher odds of being diagnosed with pulmonary embolism (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.20-2.36, q=0.009) and diabetes (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.75-2.58, q<0.001), but lower odds of encephalopathy (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.45-0.75, q<0.001), compared to white patients. Hispanic patients had higher odds of being diagnosed with headaches (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.24-1.60, q<0.001) and chest pain (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.35-1.67, q < 0.001), but lower odds of encephalopathy (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.51-0.80, q<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to white patients, patients from racial/ethnic minority groups had significantly different odds of developing potential PASC symptoms and conditions. Future research should examine the reasons for these differences.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Ethnicity , Cohort Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Testing , Minority Groups , New York City/epidemiology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology
8.
J Korean Med Sci ; 38(11): e83, 2023 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265094

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate the factors associated with neurological manifestations of post-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) conditions. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from 440 patients who visited our post-COVID-19 clinic more than 4 weeks after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. We analyzed the prevalence of different neurological symptoms (brain fog, memory impairment, headache, and dizziness) and assessed the associated factors. RESULTS: Brain fog was the most common symptom, observed in 170 patients (38.6%), followed by headaches (n = 137, 31.1%), dizziness (n = 128, 29%), and memory impairment (n = 104, 23.6%). Brain fog was associated with hyposmia or hypogeusia (odds ratio [OR], 2.54; P < 0.001), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) (OR, 1.06; P < 0.001), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (OR, 1.09; P = 0.037). Memory impairment was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.83; P < 0.001), FSS (OR, 1.05; P < 0.001), and age (OR, 1.02; P = 0.015). Headache was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.28; P = 0.001), sex (OR, 1.68; P = 0.042), and FSS (OR, 1.04; P < 0.001). Dizziness was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.88; P < 0.001), and FSS (OR, 1.04; P < 0.001). The incidence of brain fog (P < 0.001), memory impairment (P < 0.001), dizziness (P = 0.007), and headache (P = 0.045) accompanied by hyposmia and hypogeusia was higher in patients with the aforementioned symptoms than in those without. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that there is a relationship between neurological symptoms and other clinical factors, such as fatigue, depression, anxiety, hyposmia, and hypogeusia.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Dizziness/complications , Retrospective Studies , Ageusia/etiology , Anosmia/etiology , Headache/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Fatigue/etiology
9.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 219: 107339, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headache is the most common COVID-19-related neurological symptom. We investigated the characteristics of COVID-19-related headache and their relationship with clinical severity in Kirsehir Province, Turkey. METHODS: This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled 226 COVID-19-positive patients who developed headache during acute infection. Demographic data, headache characteristics, and infection symptoms were recorded. The clinical severity of COVID-19 was documented in each participant. RESULT: New-onset COVID-19-related headaches lasting 4 days were reported in 164 patients (72.5 %); these were mostly bilaterally or localized to the forehead (58.4 %), pulsating (42.5 %), moderate to severe intensity (30.1 %), with a partial response to paracetamol (23.5 %). The other 62 patients (27.4 %) reported headaches before COVID-19. Their COVID-related headaches were fiery type (p = 0.025), of very severe intensity (p = 0.008), had a holocranial distribution (p = 0.004), and were less response to paracetamol (p = 0.003); the headaches were significantly more frequent after COVID-19 than before COVID-19. Older age, high body mass index, and low education level were significantly higher in the severe group (all p < 0.001). Female sex (p = 0.019) and being a healthcare worker (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral, prolonged, moderate to severe headaches that were analgesic resistant are more frequent in patients with COVID-19 infection. Further study should examine whether the headache characteristics distinguish COVID-19-related headaches from other types, particularly in asymptomatic subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 549, 2023 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telecommuting has expanded greatly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the advent of remote working from home, there has been an ongoing controversy about the positive or negative health-related impact of telecommuting. This study aimed to investigate change in the occupational health risk in South Korean workers involved in telecommuting during the pandemic period compared to daily commuters. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study of South Korean workers using the secondary data from the 6th Korean Working Conditions Survey (2020-2021) was designed. A total of 12,354 white-collar wage employees were selected as the study sample. Telecommuting, depression, anxiety, insomnia, fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, headache-eye strain, absenteeism, and presenteeism were measured by self-reported data. Multiple logistic regression models, including gender stratification analysis, were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for the health outcomes of telecommuters. RESULTS: Among the study population, 338 males and 318 females were reported to be telecommuters. The entirely adjusted regression model showed a positive association between telecommuting and anxiety (AOR = 2.82; 95% CI, 1.93-4.10), insomnia (AOR = 1.93; 95% CI, 1.27-2.92), fatigue (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.30-2.37), musculoskeletal pain (AOR = 1,76; 95% CI, 1.33-2.32), headache-eye strain (AOR = 1.94; 95% CI, 1.48-2.54), presenteeism (AOR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.20-2.28) respectively. Gender difference was identified in that only female telecommuters had a higher risk of depression (AOR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.04-2.53) and insomnia (AOR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.26-3.41) than daily commuters in the adjusted model. CONCLUSION: Telecommuting was significantly associated with an increased risk of various health problems among South Korean workers and females were identified as a more vulnerable group. Although further research is required to ascertain the causal relationship, public health intervention should be considered to prevent the negative effects of telecommuting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Pain , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Teleworking , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(11): e33236, 2023 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268212

ABSTRACT

Due to the urgency of controlling the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, coronavirus disease 2019 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines have been expeditiously approved and introduced in several countries without sufficient evaluation for adverse events. We analyzed adverse events among Korean healthcare workers who received all 3 doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. This survey was conducted among hospital workers of Inha University Hospital who had received the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine for their first, second, third rounds, and using a diary card. The surveyed adverse events included local (redness, edema, and injection site pain) and systemic (fever, fatigue, headache, chill, myalgia, arthralgia, vomiting, diarrhea, pruritis, and urticaria) side effects and were divided into 5 grades (Grade 0 = none - Grade 4 = critical). Based on adverse events reported at least once after any of the 3 doses, the most common systemic adverse reactions were chills and headache (respectively, 62.6%, 62.4%), followed by myalgia (55.3%), arthralgia (53.4%), fatigue (51.6%), pruritus (38.1%), and fever (36.5%). The frequency and duration of adverse events were significantly greater in women (P < .05) than men. Except for redness, pruritus, urticaria, and most adverse reactions had a higher rate of occurrence after the third dose in subjects who also had reactions with the second dose. However, grade 4 adverse events did occur with the third dose in some patients, even if there were no side effects with the first and second doses. Adverse events experienced with the first and second doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in Korean healthcare workers increased the incidence of adverse events at the time of the third dose. On the other hand, grade 4 adverse events could still occur with the third dose even though there were no side effects with the first and second doses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Urticaria , Male , Humans , Female , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Arthralgia , Fatigue , Fever , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241768

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) has increased significantly in recent years. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a fundamental change in the lifestyles, ways of learning and working patterns of the general population, which in turn, might lead to health consequences. The aim of this study was to evaluate the conditions of e-learning and the impact of the learning modality on the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students in Poland. This cross-sectional study included 914 students who completed an anonymous questionnaire. The questions covered two time periods (before and during the COVID-19 pandemic) and were aimed at obtaining information about lifestyle (including physical activity using the modified International Physical Activity Questionnaire, 2007 (IPAQ), perceived stress and sleep patterns), the ergonomics of computer workstations (by Rapid Office Strain Assessment, 2012 (ROSA) method), the incidence and severity of musculoskeletal symptoms (by the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, 2018 (NMQ)) and headaches. The main differences between the two periods were statistically significant according to the Wilcoxon test in terms of physical activity, computer use time, and severity of headaches. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a significant increase in MSD (68.2% vs. 74.6%) and their intensity (2.83 ± 2.36 vs. 3.50 ± 2.79 points) among the student population (p < 0.001). In the group of students with MSD, there was a high musculoskeletal load, due to the lack of ergonomic remote learning workstations. In future, a thorough study should be carried out, and there is an urgent need to raise students' awareness of arranging learning workstations according to ergonomic principles in order to prevent the occurrence of musculoskeletal problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Pandemics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Students , Headache/epidemiology , Ergonomics , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2229204

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the course of human history and killed millions of people worldwide. Its long-term consequences remain uncertain. This study aimed to describe the short- and long-term symptoms of COVID-19 among individuals in Goiás, central Brazil, who experienced acute mild or non-symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first wave of the pandemic. This prospective cohort study included 110 healthcare workers, 18 safety workers, and 19 administrative support workers, who were followed up for 12 months after the onset of COVID-19. Most participants were healthy adult female healthcare professionals. At the onset of infection, the major symptoms were headache, myalgia, nasal congestion, cough, coryza, anosmia, ageusia, sore throat, fatigue, diarrhea, and dyspnea. Furthermore, 20.3% of the participants had three or more COVID-19 symptoms that persisted for at least 12 months. These included coryza, congestion, hair loss, sore throat, headache, myalgia, cough, memory loss, anosmia, and fatigue. This study revealed a high prevalence of persistent symptoms of COVID-19 in healthy individuals from central Brazil, which may present an additional burden on healthcare services. Further studies are required to investigate the sequelae of COVID-19 over periods greater than 12 months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharyngitis , Adult , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Myalgia , Anosmia , Cough/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Pharyngitis/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Delivery of Health Care
14.
Rev Neurol ; 76(2): 47-57, 2023 01 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2206078

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The nationwide lockdown implemented in Spain in March 2020 in response to the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic (COVID-19) could have had an effect on the clinical situation, disease management and access to care in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted by means of an online survey. The frequency and impact of headache, visual symptoms, dizziness, cognitive symptoms, diplopia, anxiety and depression on patients' quality of life were recorded. Disease treatment and delays experienced in accessing care were recorded. Participants were grouped according to the time elapsed since diagnosis. RESULTS: A total of 112 patients participated in the study (103 women). The average time since disease onset was 6.25 years. Headache, anxiety and depression were responsible for considerable impact in the period prior to lockdown. The impact of headache was not aggravated during lockdown, but anxiety and depression did become significantly worse. Recently diagnosed participants reported higher rates of anxiety, depression, dizziness and diplopia; chronically diagnosed participants reported a higher frequency of cognitive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical situation of the participants deteriorated during lockdown, although the differences were smaller than previously thought. This was probably because the baseline situation was more severe than expected. Further studies are needed to clarify the medium and long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.


TITLE: Impacto del confinamiento por COVID-19 en pacientes con hipertensión intracraneal idiopática en España.Introducción. El confinamiento nacional instaurado en España en marzo de 2020 como respuesta a la pandemia por la enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pudo tener un efecto en la situación clínica, el manejo de la enfermedad y el acceso a la atención médica en pacientes con hipertensión intracraneal idiopática. Pacientes y métodos. Se realizó un estudio observacional transversal por medio de una encuesta en línea. Se registraron la frecuencia y el impacto en la calidad de vida de la cefalea, los síntomas visuales, el mareo, los síntomas cognitivos, la diplopía, la ansiedad y la depresión. Se registró el tratamiento de la enfermedad y los retrasos experimentados en el acceso a la atención médica. Se agrupó a los participantes según el tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico. Resultados. Participaron 112 pacientes (103 mujeres). El tiempo medio de evolución de la enfermedad fue 6,25 años. La cefalea, la ansiedad y la depresión fueron responsables de un impacto considerable en el período previo al confinamiento. El impacto de la cefalea no empeoró durante el confinamiento, pero la ansiedad y la depresión empeoraron significativamente. Los participantes diagnosticados recientemente comunicaron mayores tasas de ansiedad, depresión, mareo y diplopía; los de evolución crónica, mayor frecuencia de síntomas cognitivos. Conclusiones. La situación clínica de los participantes se deterioró durante el confinamiento, aunque las diferencias fueron menores de lo que se pensaba. Esto se debió, probablemente, a que la situación basal era más grave de lo esperado. Son necesarios más estudios para aclarar el impacto a medio y largo plazo de la pandemia por COVID-19 en pacientes con hipertensión intracraneal idiopática.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pseudotumor Cerebri , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Quality of Life , Spain/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dizziness , Diplopia , Pseudotumor Cerebri/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
15.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 226: 107610, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2177632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the prevalence of headache, migraine, and medication-overuse headache (MOH) among children and adolescents through a school-based online questionnaire. We also investigated the triggers for migraine among them and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on headache frequency. METHODS: Children and adolescents aged 6-17 y.o. completed an online questionnaire. Migraine, MOH was defined as The International Classification of Headache Disorders Third edition. Factor and clustering analyses were performed for migraine triggers. The effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on headache frequency was also asked. RESULTS: Of the 2489 respondents, the prevalence of headache, migraine, and MOH were 36.44%, 9.48%, and 0.44%, respectively. Up to 70% of the respondents with headaches complained of the disturbance to daily life, but about 30% consulted doctors. The migraine triggers were grouped into 5 factors by factor analysis. The sensitivities of the migraineurs against the factors were divided into 3 clusters. Cluster 1 had stronger sensitivity for several triggers. Cluster 2 was sensitive to weather, smartphones, and video games. Cluster 3 had less sensitivity for triggers. Cluster 2 less consulted doctors even though the burden of migraine was enormous. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 10.25% of respondents increased headache attacks, while 3.97% decreased. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first detailed study on headache prevalence in Japanese students from elementary school to high school in one region. The burden of headaches is large among children and adolescents, and the unmet needs of its clinical practice should be corrected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache Disorders, Secondary , Headache Disorders , Migraine Disorders , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Prevalence , Pandemics , East Asian People , COVID-19/epidemiology , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache Disorders, Secondary/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 162(1): 133-138, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2173005

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impacts of messenger RNA coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines in Taiwanese pregnant women in terms of obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: The authors prospectively followed up 450 pregnant women receiving vaccination at a single center. Patients recorded prespecified adverse reactions via a mobile application up to 30 days after the first and second doses. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes were compared with those of pregnant women, during the same period, who did not undergo vaccination. RESULTS: Among the 387 women who received the first dose and were followed up for 30 days, injection site pain, fatigue, injection site swelling, muscle ache, and headache were the most prevalent side effects. There were 4.7-, 5.7-, 7.1-, and 9.3-fold increases in fatigue, injection site swelling, muscle ache, and headache, respectively, among the 231 women who received the second dose. Most of the side effects resolved by 14 days and all resolved by 30 days after each doses. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in obstetrical and neonatal morbidity or mortality between the vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts. CONCLUSION: No serious adverse reactions were noted among pregnant women receiving messenger RNA vaccinations with comparable obstetrical and neonatal outcomes to unvaccinated pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Female , COVID-19/prevention & control , Case-Control Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , Fatigue , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Myalgia , RNA, Messenger , Vaccination
17.
Cephalalgia ; 43(1): 3331024221131337, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194918

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective is to summarize the knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of secondary headache attributed to SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination; as well as to delineate their impact on primary headache disorders. METHODS: This is a narrative review of the literature regarding primary and secondary headache disorders in the setting of COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted a literature search in 2022 on PubMed, with the keywords "COVID 19" or "vaccine" and "headache" to assess the appropriateness of all published articles for their inclusion in the review. RESULTS: Headache is a common and sometimes difficult-to-treat symptom of both the acute and post-acute phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Different pathophysiological mechanisms may be involved, with the trigeminovascular system as a plausible target. Specific evidence-based effective therapeutic options are lacking at present. Headache attributed to SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations is also common, its pathophysiology being unclear. People with primary headache disorders experience headache in the acute phase of COVID-19 and after vaccination more commonly than the general population. Pandemic measures, forcing lifestyle changes, seemed to have had a positive impact on migraine, and changes in headache care (telemedicine) have been effectively introduced. CONCLUSIONS: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is a global challenge, having an impact on the development of secondary headaches, both in people with or without primary headaches. This has created opportunities to better understand and treat headache and to potentiate strategies to manage patients and ensure care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Headache/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/complications
18.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(12)2022 Dec 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155200

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals with underlying chronic illnesses have demonstrated considerable hesitancy towards COVID-19 vaccines. These concerns are primarily attributed to their concerns over the safety profile. Real-world data on the safety profile among COVID-19 vaccinees with comorbid conditions are scarce. This study aimed to ascertain the side-effects profile after two doses of COVID-19 vaccines among chronic-disease patients. Methodology: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among faculty members with comorbid conditions at a public educational institute in Saudi Arabia. A 20-item questionnaire recorded the demographics and side effects after the two doses of COVID-19 vaccines. The frequency of side effects was recorded following each dose of vaccine, and the association of the side-effects score with the demographics was ascertained through appropriate statistics. Results: A total of 204 patients with at least one comorbid condition were included in this study. A total of 24 side effects were reported after the first dose and 22 after second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. The incidence of at least one side effect was 88.7% and 95.1% after the first and second doses of the vaccine, respectively. The frequent side effects after the first dose were pain at the injection site (63.2%), fatigue (58.8%), fever (47.5%), muscle and joint pain (38.7%), and headache (36.3%). However, pain at the injection site (71.1%), muscle and joint pain (62.7%), headache (49.5%), fever (45.6%), and stress (33.3%) were frequent after the second dose. The average side-effects score was 4.41 ± 4.18 (median: 3, IQR: 1, 6) and 4.79 ± 3.54 (median 4, IQR: 2, 6) after the first and second dose, respectively. Female gender, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, comorbidity > 2, family history of COVID-19, and the AstraZeneca vaccine were significantly associated with higher side-effect scores. Only 35.8% of study participants were satisfied with the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. Conclusions: Our analysis showed a high proportion of transient and short-lived side effects of Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines among individuals with chronic illnesses. However, the side-effects profile was comparable with the safety reports of phase 3 clinical trials of these vaccines. The frequency of side effects was found to be associated with certain demographics, necessitating the need for further investigations to establish a causal relationship. The current study's findings will help instill confidence in the COVID-19 vaccines among people living with chronic conditions, overcome vaccine hesitancy, and increase vaccine coverage in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Humans , Female , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Comorbidity , Pain , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Arthralgia
19.
J Neurol Sci ; 443: 120485, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Scientific data regarding the prevalence of COVID-19 neurological manifestations and prognosis in Latin America countries is still lacking. Therefore, the study aims to understand neurological manifestations of SARS-CoV 2 infection and outcomes in the Brazilian population. METHODS: This study is part of the Brazilian COVID-19 Registry, a multicentric cohort, including data from 37 hospitals. For the present analysis, patients were grouped according to the presence of reported symptoms (i.e., headache; anosmia and ageusia; syncope and dizziness) vs. clinically-diagnosed neurological manifestations (clinically-defined neurological syndrome: neurological signs or diagnoses captured by clinical evaluation) and matched with patients without neurological manifestations by age, sex, number of comorbidities, hospital of admission, and whether or not patients had underlying neurological disease. RESULTS: From 6,635 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, 30.8% presented reported neurological manifestations, 10.3% were diagnosed with a neurological syndrome and 60.1% did not show any neurological manifestations. In patients with reported symptoms, the most common ones were headache (20.7%), ageusia (11.1%) and anosmia (8.0%). In patients with neurological syndromes, acute encephalopathy was the most common diagnosis (9.7%). In the matched analysis, patients with neurological syndromes presented more cases of septic shock (17.0 vs. 13.0%, p = 0.045), intensive care unit admission (45.3 vs. 38.9%, p = 0.023), and mortality (38.7 vs. 32.6%, p = 0.026; and 39.2 vs. 30.3%, p < 0.001) when compared to controls. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 in-hospital patients with clinically defined neurological syndromes presented a higher incidence of septic shock, ICU admission and death when compared to controls.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Shock, Septic , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anosmia , Shock, Septic/complications , Brazil/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Hospitals
20.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2581, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090780

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic for coronavirus 19. Typical symptoms were fever, cough, asthenia, dyspnea, and muscle pain. Pulmonary and central nervous system compromise presented challenging characteristics for healthcare physicians. The objectives of this study were to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-COV-2 infection survivors in a region of Argentina and to determine differences between gender, age groups, year of infection, and evolution time since diagnosis. Methods: A descriptive and analytical cross-sectional observational study was carried out. A self-administered questionnaire was applied, which was available between August and December 2021. Results: Among 1868 individuals included, the mean age was 39.4 ± 13.9 years, and 72.8% were female. Arterial hypertension was the most frequent comorbidity (11.7%). The majority were outpatients (81.9%). The most frequent presentation symptoms at all ages were asthenia (83.7%), fever (54.9%), headache (60.8%), anosmia (64.8%), ageusia (53.2%), cough (54.4%) and myalgias (53.7%). For the 18 to 29 years old age group, the most prevalent presentation symptoms were: headache (69.4%), anosmia (69.1%), ageusia (60.2%), odynophagia (45%), and rhinitis/nasal congestion (46.9%). In the 30 to 64 years old age group, there was a higher prevalence of myalgias (55.8%), arthralgias (41%), and concentration/memory disorder (28.3%). Male showed higher prevalence of fever (64.9% versus 51.1%; p < 0.001) and pneumonia (23.5% versus 13.4%; p < 0.001). After 12 weeks from diagnosis, 38.1% of patients persisted with asthenia, 23.6% with anosmia/dysosmia, and 21.2% with concentration/memory disorders. Conclusions: Systemic symptoms were common to all age groups with coronavirus 19 disease; however, younger, and intermediate age groups presented a higher prevalence of central nervous system symptoms such as anosmia and cognitive disorders, respectively. Symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis reached slightly more than 10% of the participants.


Introducción: En marzo de 2020 la enfermedad por coronavirus 19 fue declarada pandemia por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Los síntomas más comunes fueron fiebre, tos, astenia, disnea y dolor muscular. Los compromisos pulmonar y del sistema nervioso central presentaron características desafiantes para los médicos asistenciales. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer las características epidemiológicas y clínicas de sobrevivientes a infección por SARS-CoV-2 en una región de Argentina, y determinar las diferencias entre género, grupos etarias, año de contagio, tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo y analítico de corte transversal. Se aplicó un cuestionario auto administrado, que estuvo disponible entre agosto y diciembre de 2021. Resultados: La media de edad fue de 39,4 ± 13,9 años, el 72,8% fueron mujeres. La comorbilidad más frecuente fue hipertensión arterial (11,7%). La mayoría de los pacientes fueron ambulatorios (81,9%). Los síntomas de presentación más frecuentes a cualquier edad, fueron astenia (83,7%), fiebre (54,9%), cefalea (60,8%), anosmia (64,8%), ageusia (53,2%), tos (54,4%) y mialgias (53,7%). Para el grupo de 18 a 29 años los síntomas de presentación más prevalentes fueron cefalea (69,4%), anosmia 69,1%), ageusia (60,2%), odinofagia (45%) y rinitis/congestión nasal (46,9%). En el grupo de 30 a 64 años se observó mayor prevalencia de mialgias (55,8%), artralgias (41%), falta de concentración/memoria (28,3%). Los hombres mostraron más prevalencia de fiebre (64,9% versus 51,1%; p < 0,001) y neumonía (23,5% versus 13,4%; p < 0,001). Luego de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico 38,1% de los pacientes persistían con astenia, 23,6% con anosmia/disosmia y 21,2% con trastornos de concentración/memoria. Conclusiones: La enfermedad por coronavirus 19 presenta un patrón de síntomas sistémicos común a todos los grupos etarios. No obstante, los grupos más jóvenes presentan más prevalencia de síntomas de afección del sistema nervioso central como la anosmia y los grupos intermedios, mayor prevalencia de trastornos cognitivos. Los síntomas más allá de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico alcanzaron a algo más del 10% de los participantes.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Asthenia , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Survivors
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