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1.
J Neurol Sci ; 443: 120485, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Scientific data regarding the prevalence of COVID-19 neurological manifestations and prognosis in Latin America countries is still lacking. Therefore, the study aims to understand neurological manifestations of SARS-CoV 2 infection and outcomes in the Brazilian population. METHODS: This study is part of the Brazilian COVID-19 Registry, a multicentric cohort, including data from 37 hospitals. For the present analysis, patients were grouped according to the presence of reported symptoms (i.e., headache; anosmia and ageusia; syncope and dizziness) vs. clinically-diagnosed neurological manifestations (clinically-defined neurological syndrome: neurological signs or diagnoses captured by clinical evaluation) and matched with patients without neurological manifestations by age, sex, number of comorbidities, hospital of admission, and whether or not patients had underlying neurological disease. RESULTS: From 6,635 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, 30.8% presented reported neurological manifestations, 10.3% were diagnosed with a neurological syndrome and 60.1% did not show any neurological manifestations. In patients with reported symptoms, the most common ones were headache (20.7%), ageusia (11.1%) and anosmia (8.0%). In patients with neurological syndromes, acute encephalopathy was the most common diagnosis (9.7%). In the matched analysis, patients with neurological syndromes presented more cases of septic shock (17.0 vs. 13.0%, p = 0.045), intensive care unit admission (45.3 vs. 38.9%, p = 0.023), and mortality (38.7 vs. 32.6%, p = 0.026; and 39.2 vs. 30.3%, p < 0.001) when compared to controls. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 in-hospital patients with clinically defined neurological syndromes presented a higher incidence of septic shock, ICU admission and death when compared to controls.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Shock, Septic , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anosmia , Shock, Septic/complications , Brazil/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Hospitals
2.
Medwave ; 22(9): e2581, 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090780

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic for coronavirus 19. Typical symptoms were fever, cough, asthenia, dyspnea, and muscle pain. Pulmonary and central nervous system compromise presented challenging characteristics for healthcare physicians. The objectives of this study were to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of SARS-COV-2 infection survivors in a region of Argentina and to determine differences between gender, age groups, year of infection, and evolution time since diagnosis. Methods: A descriptive and analytical cross-sectional observational study was carried out. A self-administered questionnaire was applied, which was available between August and December 2021. Results: Among 1868 individuals included, the mean age was 39.4 ± 13.9 years, and 72.8% were female. Arterial hypertension was the most frequent comorbidity (11.7%). The majority were outpatients (81.9%). The most frequent presentation symptoms at all ages were asthenia (83.7%), fever (54.9%), headache (60.8%), anosmia (64.8%), ageusia (53.2%), cough (54.4%) and myalgias (53.7%). For the 18 to 29 years old age group, the most prevalent presentation symptoms were: headache (69.4%), anosmia (69.1%), ageusia (60.2%), odynophagia (45%), and rhinitis/nasal congestion (46.9%). In the 30 to 64 years old age group, there was a higher prevalence of myalgias (55.8%), arthralgias (41%), and concentration/memory disorder (28.3%). Male showed higher prevalence of fever (64.9% versus 51.1%; p < 0.001) and pneumonia (23.5% versus 13.4%; p < 0.001). After 12 weeks from diagnosis, 38.1% of patients persisted with asthenia, 23.6% with anosmia/dysosmia, and 21.2% with concentration/memory disorders. Conclusions: Systemic symptoms were common to all age groups with coronavirus 19 disease; however, younger, and intermediate age groups presented a higher prevalence of central nervous system symptoms such as anosmia and cognitive disorders, respectively. Symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis reached slightly more than 10% of the participants.


Introducción: En marzo de 2020 la enfermedad por coronavirus 19 fue declarada pandemia por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Los síntomas más comunes fueron fiebre, tos, astenia, disnea y dolor muscular. Los compromisos pulmonar y del sistema nervioso central presentaron características desafiantes para los médicos asistenciales. Los objetivos del estudio fueron conocer las características epidemiológicas y clínicas de sobrevivientes a infección por SARS-CoV-2 en una región de Argentina, y determinar las diferencias entre género, grupos etarias, año de contagio, tiempo de evolución desde el diagnóstico. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo y analítico de corte transversal. Se aplicó un cuestionario auto administrado, que estuvo disponible entre agosto y diciembre de 2021. Resultados: La media de edad fue de 39,4 ± 13,9 años, el 72,8% fueron mujeres. La comorbilidad más frecuente fue hipertensión arterial (11,7%). La mayoría de los pacientes fueron ambulatorios (81,9%). Los síntomas de presentación más frecuentes a cualquier edad, fueron astenia (83,7%), fiebre (54,9%), cefalea (60,8%), anosmia (64,8%), ageusia (53,2%), tos (54,4%) y mialgias (53,7%). Para el grupo de 18 a 29 años los síntomas de presentación más prevalentes fueron cefalea (69,4%), anosmia 69,1%), ageusia (60,2%), odinofagia (45%) y rinitis/congestión nasal (46,9%). En el grupo de 30 a 64 años se observó mayor prevalencia de mialgias (55,8%), artralgias (41%), falta de concentración/memoria (28,3%). Los hombres mostraron más prevalencia de fiebre (64,9% versus 51,1%; p < 0,001) y neumonía (23,5% versus 13,4%; p < 0,001). Luego de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico 38,1% de los pacientes persistían con astenia, 23,6% con anosmia/disosmia y 21,2% con trastornos de concentración/memoria. Conclusiones: La enfermedad por coronavirus 19 presenta un patrón de síntomas sistémicos común a todos los grupos etarios. No obstante, los grupos más jóvenes presentan más prevalencia de síntomas de afección del sistema nervioso central como la anosmia y los grupos intermedios, mayor prevalencia de trastornos cognitivos. Los síntomas más allá de las 12 semanas del diagnóstico alcanzaron a algo más del 10% de los participantes.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia , SARS-CoV-2 , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Asthenia , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Survivors
3.
Headache ; 62(9): 1148-1152, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2037984

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study looked at differences in the presence of headache as an onset symptom of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and as a post-COVID-19 symptom in individuals previously hospitalized owing to infection with the Wuhan, Alpha, or Delta variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). BACKGROUND: Headache can be present in up to 50% of individuals during the acute phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection and in 10% of subjects during the post-COVID-19 phase. There are no data on differences in the occurrence of headache in the acute- and post-COVID-19 phase according to the SARS-CoV-2 variants. METHODS: A cross-sectional cohort study was conducted. Unvaccinated subjects previously hospitalized for COVID-19 caused by the Wuhan (n = 201), Alpha (n = 211), or Delta (n = 202) SARS-CoV-2 variants were scheduled for a telephone interview 6 months after hospital discharge. Hospitalization data were collected from hospital medical records. RESULTS: The presence of headache as a COVID-19 onset symptom at hospitalization was higher in subjects with the Delta variant (66/202, 32.7%) than in those infected with the Wuhan (42/201, 20.9%; odds ratio [OR] 1.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-2.88) or Alpha (25/211, 11.8%; OR 3.61, 95% CI, 2.16-6.01) variants. The prevalence of post-COVID-19 headache 6 months after hospital discharge was higher in individuals infected with the Delta variant (26/202, 12.9%) than in those infected with the Wuhan (11/201, 5.5%; OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.22-5.31) or Alpha (eight of 211, 3.8%; OR 3.74, 95% CI 1.65-8.49) variants. The presence of headache as a COVID-19 onset symptom was associated with post-COVID-19 headache in subjects infected with the Wuhan (OR 7.75, 95% CI 2.15-27.93) and Delta variants (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.20-6.42) but not with the Alpha variant (OR 2.60, 95% CI 0.49-13.69). CONCLUSION: Headache was a common symptom in both the acute- and post-COVID-19 phase in subjects infected with the Wuhan, Alpha, and Delta variants but mostly in those infected with the Delta variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitalization , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Survivors
4.
Pediatr Neurol ; 137: 49-53, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on evaluations in the pediatric emergency department (ED) because of headache as main symptom. METHODS: Number and clinical features of patients evaluated in the pediatric ED of a single site in Milan, Italy, were collected between January 2017 and January 2022. The impact of COVID-19 on evaluation rates was quantified by using the incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between the pandemic (March 2020 to January 2022) and the prepandemic period (January 2017 to February 2020). RESULTS: During the study period, 890 evaluations were registered: 689 over the prepandemic period and 201 over the pandemic period. Mean age at evaluation was 10 years (range: 1 to 17 years). Evaluation rates per month were 18.1 during the prepandemic period and 8.7 during COVID-19 pandemic, with peaks in autumn and winter months and considerable drops in the summer. The IRR was 0.49 (95% CI, 0.40-0.61). The reduction in evaluation rate was higher for secondary headache (IRR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.23-0.42) when compared with primary headache (IRR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.40-0.78). CONCLUSIONS: We found a remarkable reduction in the number of evaluations in the pediatric ED for headache during the pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Infant , Child, Preschool , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Headache/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
5.
Headache ; 62(8): 1046-1052, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2019281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine-related side effects are a key concern with the emergence of various types of vaccines in the market. We aimed to assess the frequency and characteristics of headache following different types of COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: Fully vaccinated people were recruited by a convenience sample through an online survey from September 1 to December 1, 2021. Detailed analysis of headache following vaccination was investigated. Participants with a history of pre-existing headaches were telephone interviewed by a neurologist to ascertain the type of headache. RESULTS: A total of 1372 participants participated (mean age 32.9 ± 11.1). The highest frequency of headache was reported with the adenoviral vector type (302/563, 53.6%), followed by mRNA vaccines (129/269, 48%) and then the inactivated type (188/540, 34.8%). Recipients of the adenoviral vector type had a significantly longer latency between vaccination and the headache onset (median 8 h [5:12]) than recipients of the inactivated type (median 4 h [2:8], p < 0.001). Headache intensity was significantly higher with the adenoviral vector type (median 6 [5:8]) than with the inactivated type (median 5 [4:7], p < 0.001). Adenoviral vector vaccines would increase the likelihood of headache by 2.38 times more than inactivated vaccines (odds ratio [OR] 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-3.04, p < 0.001). Female sex and thyroid disease were significantly associated with headache related to COVID-19 vaccines (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.16-1.99; OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.55-10.2, respectively). CONCLUSION: Recipients of the COVID-19 vaccine should be counseled that they may experience headaches, especially after the adenoviral vector type. However, the intensity of such headache is mild to moderate and can resolve within a few days. Based on the current study design and the potential recall bias, these results may not be generalizable and should be preliminary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Headache , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(11): e782-e791, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the flexible work practices during the COVID-19 pandemic and their impact on work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and depression in frequent computer users. METHODS: An e-survey determined the extent of workplace changes and MSD, and the relationships between them using descriptive-statistics and chi-squared tests. RESULTS: Of 700 who commenced the survey, 511 were analyzed. Since the pandemic commenced, 80% of respondents reported they were working more from home; and 89% reported some musculoskeletal pain. Compared with prepandemic, more people worked in nonergonomic environments, computer configurations and body postures. Work location was associated with upper back pain ( P = 0.011); body posture with headache ( P = 0.027) and low back pain ( P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Nonergonomic work environments of frequent computer users during COVID-19 are related to having upper back pain, whereas nonergonomic postures are related to having headache and low back pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Low Back Pain , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Musculoskeletal Pain , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Workplace , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/etiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Low Back Pain/epidemiology , Low Back Pain/etiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Posture , Surveys and Questionnaires , Back Pain/epidemiology , Computers , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology
7.
J Child Neurol ; 37(10-11): 871-881, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002045

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Headache disorders are exceedingly common in children and adolescents. The association between headaches, emotional stress, and disruptions in daily routines are well established. The goal of this study is to compare the experiences of patients with a preexisting diagnosis of a primary headache disorder in terms of headache frequency and severity, lifestyle techniques for headache prevention, screen use, and mood from before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients evaluated by the Headache Clinic at Children's National Hospital between Summer 2020 and Winter 2021 were enrolled in a patient registry. Patients completed a questionnaire examining changes in headache characteristics and lifestyle factors since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 107 patients completed the survey. Since the pandemic's onset, patients reported decreased physical activity (n = 59, 55%), increased frequency of chronic headaches from 40% (N = 42) to 50% (N = 54), and increased constant daily headaches from 22% (n = 24) to 36% (n = 38). Patients reported worsened anxiety (n = 58, 54%), mood (n = 50, 47%), and workload (n = 49, 46%). Sixty-one percent (n = 65) of patients reported using screens for school for more than 6 hours per day. The majority (n = 67, 63%) of patients indicated that they would prefer attending in-person school, with 14% (n = 15) responding that they preferred online school. CONCLUSION: Since the COVID-19 pandemic's onset, pediatric headache patients have experienced increasing headache frequency, worsening anxiety and mood, decreased physical activity, and increased screen usage. Although this study is limited by sample size and observational design, future population-based studies will further elucidate the impact of this pandemic on pediatric headache.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache Disorders , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Headache/epidemiology , Headache Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Headache Pain ; 23(1): 101, 2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The burden of post-coronavirus disease (COVID)-19 symptoms has been increasing and is of great concern in patients with pre-existing chronic medical conditions.This study aimed to delineate the post-COVID-19 neuropsychiatric symptoms among migraine patients compared to the non-migraine control group. METHODS: Two groups, each of 204 COVID-19 survivors, were enrolled in the study after 3 months of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, one group fulfilling the episodic migraine criteria and the other serving as a matching control group. Subjects were evaluated through an in-person interview for post-COVID-19 neuropsychiatric symptoms, including detailed headache patterns and severity, using the visual analogue scale. RESULTS: The Frequency of headache during the acute phase of COVID-19 was more frequent in migraine patients (OR = 1.60, 95%CI = 1.04-2.45, P-value = 0.031). The reported significant post-COVID-19 neuropsychiatric symptoms in migraine patients compared to controls were fatigue (OR = 1.662, 95%CI = 1.064-2.596, P-value = 0.025), anosmia/hyposmia (OR = 2.06, 95%CI = 1.164- 3.645, P-value = 0.012), cacosmia (OR = 2.663, 95%CI = 1.145-6.195, P-value = 0.019), depression (OR = 2.259, 95%CI = 1.284- 3.975, P-value = 0.004), anxiety (OR = 3.267, 95%CI = 1.747- 6.108, P-value ≤ 0.001), insomnia (OR = 2.203, 95%CI = 1.298- 3.739, P-value = 0.003), and headache (OR = 3.148, 95%CI = 1.616-6.136, P-value = ≤ 0.001).While there was no statistically significant difference between migraine patients and controls regarding the post-COVID-19 functional status score (P-value = 0.102). The pattern of post-COVID-19 headache was reported as chronic headache transformation in 17.6% of the migraine group, with the median intensity rate being 5.5 and IQR (3-7). In the control group, 14% experienced chronic headache attributed to systemic viral infection with a median intensity rate of 2 and IQR (2-5), while 12% experienced a new daily persistent headache with a median intensity of 5 and IQR (1-6). CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the importance of follow-up migraine patients upon recovery from COVID-19 infection, being more vulnerable to post-COVID-19 symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
9.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272729, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adverse events following immunization (AEFI) against SARS-CoV-2 are common as reported by clinical trials and contemporary evidence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the local and systemic adverse events following vaccination with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and BBIBP-CorV among the healthcare professionals (HCPs) of Nepal. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 606 vaccinated HCPs of Kathmandu, Nepal. Data was collected from June 15 to 30, 2021 using a self-administered online survey tool. Multiple binary logistic regression models were used to predict the adverse events according to the vaccine types and doses after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity and previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of the participants was 35.6 (13.2) years and 52% of them were female. Almost 59% of participants were vaccinated with two doses and around 54% of total of them took the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. At least one local and systemic adverse event was reported by 54% and 62% of participants after the first dose and 37% and 49% after the second dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and by 37% and 43% after the first dose and 42% and 36% after the second dose of BBIBP-CorV vaccine respectively. Injection site pain, swelling and tenderness at the injection site were the most frequently reported local AEFI while, fatigue, headache, fever and myalgia were the most frequently reported systemic AEFI. The logistic model demonstrated that the risk of both local and systemic adverse events was higher among the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine recipients compared to the BBIBP-CorV vaccine. Almost 10% of individuals reported a post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 infection and most of them occurred after taking the first dose of vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Recipients of both the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and BBIBP-CorV vaccine among the HCPs of Nepal reported only mild and constitutional symptoms including injection site pain and tenderness, headache, fever, fatigue, etc. after vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Headache/chemically induced , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Immunization , Male , Nepal/epidemiology , Pain/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1016, 2022 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1976519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to an unprecedented increase in the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among medical personnel. The goal of this study was to determine the risk factors and frequency of PPE-induced headache during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: From January 25 to March 1, 2021, an anonymous online survey was undertaken in the Baltic states. RESULTS: In total, 2132 individuals participated. 52.3% experienced a PPE-induced headache. Usual onset time was between 2-3 h, lasting up to 1 h after PPE removal. The most common localization was in temporal and frontal regions. Headache usually occurred 2 to 3 days per week with an average pain score of 5.04 ± 1.80 points. Higher risk was associated with discomfort/pressure OR = 11.55, heat stress OR = 2.228, skin conditions OR = 1.784, long PPE use (duration 10-12 h) OR = 2,18, headache history prior PPE use OR = 1.207. Out of 52.3% respondents with PPE-induced headache, 45.5% developed de novo headache, whereas 54.5% had headache history. Statistically significant differences of PPE-induced headache between respective groups included severity (4.73 vs 5.29), duration (≥ 6 h 6.7% vs 8.2%), accompanying symptoms (nausea (19.3% vs 25.7%), photophobia (19.1% vs 25.7%), phonophobia (15.8% vs 23.5%), osmophobia (5.3% vs 12.0%)) and painkiller use (43.0% vs 61.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Over half of the medical personnel reported headache while using PPE. The risk was higher in individuals with headache history, increased duration of PPE use and discomfort while using PPE. Predisposed individuals reported PPE-induced headache which persisted longer, was more intense and debilitating than in the respondents with de novo headache.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Medical Staff , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 10253, 2022 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960470

ABSTRACT

The analysis of the public interest as reflected by Internet queries has become a highly valuable tool in many fields. The Google Trends platform, providing timely and informative data, has become increasingly popular in health and medical studies. This study explores whether Internet search frequencies for the keyword "headache" have been increasing after the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, which could signal an increased incidence of the health problem. Weekly search volume data for 5 years spanning February 2017 to February 2022 were sourced from Google Trends. Six statistical and machine-learning methods were implemented on training and testing sets via pre-set automated forecasting algorithms. Holt-Winters has been identified as overperforming in predicting web query trends through several accuracy measures and the DM test for forecasting superiority and has been employed for producing the baseline level in the estimation of excess query level over the first pandemic wave. Findings indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an increased global incidence of headache (as proxied by related web queries) in the first 6 months after its outbreak, with an excess occurrence of 4.53% globally. However, the study also concludes that the increasing trend in headache incidence at the world level would have continued in the absence of the pandemic, but it has been accelerated by the pandemic event. Results further show mixed correlations at the country-level between COVID-19 infection rates and population web-search behavior, suggesting that the increased headache incidence is caused by pandemic-related factors (i.e. increased stress and mental health problems), rather than a direct effect of coronavirus infections. Other noteworthy findings entail that in the Philippines, the term "headache" was the most frequently searched term in the period spanning February 2020 to February 2022, indicating that headache occurrences are a significant aspect that defines population health at the country level. High relative interest is also detected in Kenya and South Africa after the pandemic outbreak. Additionally, research findings indicate that the relative interest has decreased in some countries (i.e. US, Canada, and Australia), whereas it has increased in others (i.e. India and Pakistan) after the pandemic outbreak. We conclude that observing Internet search habits can provide timely information for policymakers on collective health trends, as opposed to ex-post statistics, and can furthermore yield valuable information for the pain management drug market key players about aggregate consumer behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Search Engine
12.
Ann Ig ; 34(5): 478-489, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954748

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The severe acute respiratory syndrome (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 was first reported in China in December 2019 and has generated a worldwide pandemic. The objective of the research is to examine and describe (a) the symptoms that persist after the end of the acute stage and (b) their relationship with the severity of the disease. Study Design: This study is a cross-sectional study conducted in the Kingdom of Bahrain on COVID-19 infected patients using an online survey questionnaire with a total number of 52 patient responses (29 females and 23 males). Method: A scale (0 no symptoms to 10 very high symptoms intensity) was assessed in patients after 3 months to detect the relevance of specific symptoms post-COVID-19 such as emotional and physical health, headache, dyspnoea, pain (muscles/joints/chest), anosmia, vertigo, neurologic symptoms, sarcopenia, delirium. Results: The most common COVID-19 symptoms were reported to be fever (69.2%), headache (59.6%), and cough (50.0%). Data analysis showed that BMI was not correlated with any post-acute COVID-19 symptoms. Regarding the post-acute COVID-19 symptoms, this study showed that an increase of intensity of headache was associated with an increase of delirium; an increase of intensity of dyspnoea was associated with an increase of pulmonary dysfunction. The increase of anosmia and dysgeusia was associated with an increase in delirium. In addition, the increase of neurological symptoms and delirium were associated with the increase of sarcopenia. The most common persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms observed in this study were emotional stress, followed by loss of smell and taste, and neurological symptoms. Conclusions: Therefore, follow-up and rehabilitation care for COVID-19 patients must be focused on addressing the needs of these people in the longer term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Sarcopenia , Anosmia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Neurol Sci ; 43(9): 5739-5740, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941845

ABSTRACT

We conducted an observational study of 4926 university students from all over Italy and different university courses, including health areas. Students were contacted through the most popular social networks and some student's course representatives also acted as intermediaries, from June 1 to August 31, 2021. A questionnaire has been carried out using "Google Forms" and MIDAS. The study confirmed how the headache was widespreaded among the student population and how much it was underestimated (only one-fifth of the interviewees had been to a specialist/headache center). The negative impact of habitual headache on school performance was confirmed by the attendance on courses and the overall study performance. The clinical phenomenon might have been impacted by the pandemic period and its changes in lifestyle, in the study methodology, and due to the stress increase. Finally, the means used in the study were very satisfactory: the use of peers of the interviewees and the social networks, obtaining a broad acceptance of the study and possibly offering a method which is likely to be used in the future. Students presenting habitual headaches must be aware of their condition and the need to search for an appropriate diagnosis and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Observational Studies as Topic , Students , Universities
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(14)2022 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938789

ABSTRACT

In this study, we investigated the symptoms of physical and mental health associated with lifestyle changes due to a lockdown among the students of a university in Northern Italy, one of the most affected areas in Europe during the first wave of COVID-19. We examined the psychopathological variations in relation to mental health problems in a young population. The goal was to develop interventions to resolve these new psychosocial problems. From June to July 2020, students participated in an anonymous survey asking about habits and symptoms that emerged during the lockdown and the COVID-19 pandemic. Five health outcomes were assessed: digestive disorders; headaches; fear of COVID-19; panic and anxiety crises; and depression/sadness. The conditions and duration of the social isolation, lifestyle, SARS-CoV-2 infection in the household, financial situation, and productivity were considered in the analysis. A total of 3533 students completed the survey. The participants experienced headaches, depression and sadness, digestive disorders, a fear of COVID-19, and anxiety/panic crises. The duration of isolation was associated with an increased risk of digestive disorders, headaches, and COVID-19 fear. The female gender, medium-intense telephone usage, sleep quality, memory difficulties, and performance reduction were associated with an increased risk of the health outcomes. Future interventions should focus on promoting and implementing different habits with the support of health and university organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Universities
15.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11647, 2022 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927104

ABSTRACT

People who have COVID-19 can experience symptoms for months. Studies on long COVID in the population lack representative samples and longitudinal data focusing on new-onset symptoms occurring with COVID while accounting for pre-infection symptoms. We use a sample representing the U.S. community population from the Understanding America Study COVID-19 Survey, which surveyed around 8000 respondents bi-weekly from March 2020 to March 2021. Our final sample includes 308 infected individuals who were interviewed one month before, around the time of, and 12 weeks after infection. About 23% of the sample experienced new-onset symptoms during infection which lasted for more than 12 weeks, and thus can be considered as having long COVID. The most common new-onset persistent symptoms among those included in the study were headache (22%), runny or stuffy nose (19%), abdominal discomfort (18%), fatigue (17%), and diarrhea (13%). Long COVID was more likely among obese individuals (OR = 5.44, 95% CI 2.12-13.96) and those who experienced hair loss (OR = 6.94, 95% CI 1.03-46.92), headache (OR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.18-9.60), and sore throat (OR = 3.56, 95% CI 1.21-10.46) during infection. There was a lack of evidence relating risk to age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, current smoking status, or comorbid chronic conditions. This work provides national estimates of long COVID in a representative sample after accounting for pre-infection symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health ; 95(10): 1945-1954, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Headaches related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) could affect performance at work in healthcare personnel. Our aim was to describe the prevalence and risk factors for headaches related to PPE, in the personnel of a specialized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) tertiary hospital. METHODS: In this cross-sectional survey study, we invited healthcare workers from COVID-19 referral center in Mexico (May 22-June 19, 2020) to answer a standardized structure questionnaire on characteristics of new-onset PPE-related headache or exacerbation of primary headache disorder. Participants were invited regardless of whether they had a current headache to avoid selection bias. This is the primary analysis of these data. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty-eight subjects were analyzed, 181/268 (67.5%) women, 177/268 (66%) nurses, mean age 28 years. The prevalence of PPE-related headache was 210/268 (78.4%). Independent risk factors were occupation other than physician (OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.20-2.10), age > 30 years (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.25-5.14), and female sex (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.86-6.87). In the 6-month follow-up, 13.1% of subjects evolve to chronic headache, with stress as predictive risk factor. CONCLUSION: The frequency of PPE-associated headache is high, and a subgroup could evolve to chronic headache. More studies are necessary to improve the knowledge about this condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache Disorders , Female , Humans , Adult , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Mexico/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Headache Disorders/complications
17.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 219: 107339, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headache is the most common COVID-19-related neurological symptom. We investigated the characteristics of COVID-19-related headache and their relationship with clinical severity in Kirsehir Province, Turkey. METHODS: This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled 226 COVID-19-positive patients who developed headache during acute infection. Demographic data, headache characteristics, and infection symptoms were recorded. The clinical severity of COVID-19 was documented in each participant. RESULT: New-onset COVID-19-related headaches lasting 4 days were reported in 164 patients (72.5 %); these were mostly bilaterally or localized to the forehead (58.4 %), pulsating (42.5 %), moderate to severe intensity (30.1 %), with a partial response to paracetamol (23.5 %). The other 62 patients (27.4 %) reported headaches before COVID-19. Their COVID-related headaches were fiery type (p = 0.025), of very severe intensity (p = 0.008), had a holocranial distribution (p = 0.004), and were less response to paracetamol (p = 0.003); the headaches were significantly more frequent after COVID-19 than before COVID-19. Older age, high body mass index, and low education level were significantly higher in the severe group (all p < 0.001). Female sex (p = 0.019) and being a healthcare worker (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral, prolonged, moderate to severe headaches that were analgesic resistant are more frequent in patients with COVID-19 infection. Further study should examine whether the headache characteristics distinguish COVID-19-related headaches from other types, particularly in asymptomatic subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Headache ; 62(7): 903-907, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879033

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headache can be a prominent feature of Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-Cov2 infection (PASC) and previous studies have centered around PASC headaches that have resolved within a month of infection. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 31 adults evaluated at the Stanford Headache Clinic between September 2020 and January 2022 who developed new or worsening headaches after COVID-19 infection that were unresolved at time of evaluation for demographics, medical history, and headache diagnosis. RESULTS: Headache had been present for a mean duration of 7.4±4.8 months after infection. Notably, 25/31 (81%) had a previous history of headache. The specific features of the headache varied considerably, but 23/31 (74%) met International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition (ICHD-3) criteria for migraine, with 20/31 (65%) meeting ICHD-3 criteria for chronic migraine, while only 5/31 (16%) met these criteria before COVID infection. Additionally, full-time employment decreased from 25/31 (81%) to 17/31 (55%). Prior to establishing care at our clinic, 13/18 (72%) of the patients who were started on preventive medications currently indicated for migraine management, reported a decrease in frequency and/or severity of headaches. CONCLUSIONS: Our study presents a group of patients with protracted headache after COVID-19 infection that includes both patients with a previously lower headache burden who largely exhibited chronification from episodic to chronic migraine, as well as patients with no previous history of headache who meet ICHD-3 criteria for headache attributed to a systemic viral illness, mostly with a migrainous phenotype.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Migraine Disorders/etiology , RNA, Viral/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Brain Behav ; 12(5): e2588, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1866506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Migraine-and episodic headache-is one of the most common types of primary headache. Migraine is considered a serious health problem that affects the quality of life. During university life, students often report increased levels of stress, depression, anxiety, and irregular sleep, all of which are associated with migraines. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of migraine headaches among medical campus students at the University of Khartoum, Sudan. Based on available data, migraine is on the rise in both general populations as well as in university students. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. The study population was composed of students registered to the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy at Khartoum University in the academic years of 2020-2021. Out of these, 318 of them accepted to participate. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months formed the headache group. Afterwards, two preliminary questions were applied to the headache group and participants with at least one affirmative response were asked to perform the validated ID-Migraine™ test. RESULTS: The mean age of 318 students participating in the study was 19.23 ± 1.84 (17-39 years), with adolescents:adult ratio being 2.5:1. A total of 1613 students (43.7%) had at least two headaches in the last 3 months. Migraine-type headache was detected in 266 subjects (7.2%) based on the ID-Migraine™ test. Of the migraine group, 72 were male (27.1%) and 194 were female (72.9%). There was no significant difference in migraine prevalence between adolescent and adult age groups. CONCLUSIONS: With prevalence similar to adults, primary care physicians should be aware of the probability of migraine headaches in university students in order to maintain a successful school performance.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance , Migraine Disorders , Students, Medical , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Prevalence , Quality of Life
20.
Rev Paul Pediatr ; 40: e2021172, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841208

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical and epidemiological aspects of children and adolescents infected with the SARS-CoV-2 in the Municipality of Taubaté, SP, from March to November 2020. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with secondary data obtained from the Epidemiological Surveillance System about confirmed cases in city residents and from medical records of patients who were treated in hospitals in Taubaté, aged between 0 and 19 years. Chi-square and Student's t tests were used for comparisons. RESULTS: 677 cases in the studied age range were reported during the study period, corresponding to 10.1% of cases reported in the municipality. The rapid antibody test was the most used to confirm infection, followed by RT-PCR and serology. Symptoms were described in 57.7% of the cases, mainly fever and cough. Diarrhea was associated with age below 4 years, while fever, cough, headache, odynophagia, ageusia, anosmia, myalgia, and dyspnea were associated with an age ranging from 10 to 19 years. In the study period, there were no deaths from COVID-19 of residents of the municipality in the age group from 0 to 19 years. CONCLUSIONS: The study was able to identify the proportion of involvement of COVID-19 in children and adolescents in the city, and the disease had a mild evolution. The main symptoms were fever and cough, but mainly diarrhea in younger children, and headache, odynophagia, anosmia, ageusia, and myalgia in adolescents.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anosmia , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cough , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diarrhea , Fever/epidemiology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Myalgia/diagnosis , Myalgia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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