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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(22): e33948, 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244392

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an autoimmune vasculitis that affects large and medium-sized blood vessels. The mRNA vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) has been associated with the development of immune-mediated diseases. In this article, we present a case of GCA that developed after vaccination against SARS-CoV2. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 77-year-old man developed fever, general fatigue, and headache 1 day after the third dose of vaccination against SARS-CoV2. Nodular swelling and tenderness of the bilateral temporal arteries were observed. DIAGNOSES: Although right temporal artery biopsies were negative, the patient was diagnosed with GCA based on criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology for the classification of GCA. INTERVENTIONS: The patient received methylprednisolone 1000 mg for 3 days. This was followed by prednisolone 1 mg/kg/d, which was decreased by 10 mg every week to 30 mg. From day 16 of hospitalization, the patient received tocilizumab 162 mg/wk every other week. OUTCOMES: There was no occurrence of acute side effects. After 38 days of treatment, the condition improved and the patient was discharged from the hospital; as stated above, the dose of prednisolone was tapered to 30 mg/d. LESSONS: We experienced a case of GCA that occurred immediately after vaccination against SARS-CoV2 with an mRNA vaccine. Early signs of GCA include fever, fatigue, and headache, and often resemble those noted after vaccination against SARS-CoV2. The potential presence of GCA should be determined in individuals with persistent fever and headache after vaccination against SARS-CoV2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Giant Cell Arteritis , Male , Humans , Aged , Giant Cell Arteritis/etiology , Giant Cell Arteritis/complications , RNA, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Headache/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
3.
J Assoc Physicians India ; 71(3): 11-12, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326841

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prolonged use of N95 masks by healthcare workers might affect physical health due to mask-related hypoxia in addition to the psychological effects of N95 masks. We tried to explore the association of N95 mask-related hypoxia and headache with stress, quality of sleep, and anxiety in the current study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample (N = 78) consisted of 41 doctors and 37 nurses involved in COVID-19 patient care and using N95 masks with or without PPE for at least 4 hours. Perceived stress scale (PSS), Coronavirus anxiety scale (CAS), and Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) were administered, and physical parameters like heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were measured. RESULTS: Around 42% of the study participants experienced headaches after wearing an N95 mask and had a higher increase in heart rate (mean percent:10.5% vs 6.3%) and decline in SpO2 (mean percent: 2.6% vs 1.5%) compared to those who didn't develop a headache after N95 mask use. Independent samples t-test showed a mean difference for PSS and CAS between those who experienced headaches and those who didn't. The mean PSQI scores among the study participants were 8.91 ± 5.78; the score among those participants with and without headache was 10.57 ± 3.11 and 7.68 ± 2.53, respectively. CONCLUSION: Perceived corona anxiety, poor sleep quality, and corona anxiety are associated with N95-related headaches and SpO2 drop among health professionals who wear N95 masks for at least 4 hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tension-Type Headache , Humans , N95 Respirators , Sleep Quality , Masks/adverse effects , Headache/etiology , Hypoxia/etiology , Patient Care , Health Personnel , Anxiety/etiology
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 16(5)2023 May 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326046

ABSTRACT

Long COVID-19 syndrome has been reported among children and adolescents following COVID-19 recovery. Among them, notable symptoms include myalgia, insomnia, loss of smell and headache. Yet, novel manifestations are being discovered daily. Herein, we report two cases of vestibular migraine post-COVID-19 involving two children who presented with vestibular migraine symptoms following COVID-19 infection and their management. Children post-COVID-19 should be thoroughly evaluated for vestibular migraine symptoms so they can be managed promptly. This is the first article to report vestibular migraine as a manifestation of long COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , Vertigo/etiology , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/etiology , Headache/etiology
5.
Acta Neurol Taiwan ; 32(2): 65-68, 2023 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323665

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During COVID-19 pandemic, the authorization of emergent usage of new vaccine has raised suspicions and doubts about potential adverse events related to vaccination. Among the reported adverse events related to ChAdOx1/nCoV-19 vaccine, facial paralysis did not have an incident rate higher than natural occurrence like mRNA vaccines. However, temporal association between vaccination and facial palsy have been documented in several studies. Here, we report a case of an otherwise healthy 23-year-old Taiwanese female who experienced prolonged headache since the second day postvaccination and developed facial palsy on the tenth day. CASE REPORT: A 23-year-old Taiwanese female who was previously healthy experienced intermittent right side throbbing headache, general malaise, myalgia and fever. Headache, transient ear pain and right scalp numbness developed in the next few days but quickly resolved. On day ten after vaccination, signs of facial palsy on the right side of her face was noticed. The results of brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with contrast displayed no abnormality. Facial stimulation and blink reflex tests were compatible with right facial neuropathy. CONCLUSION: Reactivation of latent herpes virus has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms underlying the phenomenon, but the causal pathophysiology related to the symptom needs further validation. Moreover, in the event of facial palsy post-vaccination, alternative diagnoses such as Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, Lyme disease, trauma, central nervous system infection (CNS) infection, or stroke should also be considered.


Subject(s)
Bell Palsy , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Facial Paralysis , Headache , Adult , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Bell Palsy/etiology , Bell Palsy/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Headache/etiology , Pandemics , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
Acta Neurol Taiwan ; 32(2): 57-64, 2023 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), health care workers (HCWs) are at very high risk. Personal protective equipment (PPE) and masks are not only difficult to wear while working but also causes various complications. The present self-administered questionnaire- based study aimed to explore the headache and complications in HCWs on wearing PPE during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The present study was performed by obtaining a self-administered questionnaire from HCWs, which provides evidence of various complications due to the use of a PPE and mask. RESULTS: Out of a total of 329 respondents, 189(57.45%), 67(20.36%), 238(72.34%), 213(64.74%), 177(53.80%), and 34(10.33%) reported headache, breathlessness, suffocation, nose pain, ear pain, and leg pain respectively. Out of 329 respondents, 47(14.29%) had pre-existing headaches. Headache was significantly high for those who wore PPE for 4-6h (121/133; 87.05%) than that of those who wore up to 4h (18/26; 69.23%). Of the 34(24.46%) required medication who reported headaches wearing PPE. Acetaminophen is quite helpful in most health care workers to decrease headaches. Nose-related complications occur frequently in health care workers after regular shifts for more than 6 days. Gelatinous adhesives patch was a wonderful prophylactic remedy as it was helpful to prevent nose- related complications in 24 HCWs out of 25(96%). CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the HCWs reported headache, suffocation, nose pain, and ear pain. Duration of PPE use of more than 4h is significantly associated with headache. Short duration PPE use prevent HCWs from headache and various ill effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Asphyxia/complications , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology
7.
Head Face Med ; 19(1): 19, 2023 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is evidence of the occurrence of headache after vaccination against COVID-19. However, only a few studies have examined the headache characteristics and related determinants, especially among healthcare workers with a history of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: We evaluated the incidence of headaches after injection of different types of COVID-19 vaccine to determine factors relating to the incidence of headache after vaccination among the Iranian healthcare workers who had previously contracted COVID-19. A group of 334 healthcare workers with a history of COVID-19 infection were included and vaccinated (at least one month after recovery without any COVID-19 related symptoms) with different COVID-19 vaccines. The baseline information, headache characteristics and vaccine specifications were recorded. RESULTS: Overall, 39.2% reported experiencing a post-vaccination headache. Of those with a previous history of headache, 51.1% reported migraine-type, 27.4% tension-type and 21.5% other types. The mean time between vaccination and headache appearance was 26.78 ± 6.93 h, with the headache appearing less than 24 h after vaccination in most patients (83.2%). The headaches reached its peak within 8.62 ± 2.41 h. Most patients reported a compression-type headache. The prevalence of post-vaccination headaches was significantly different according to the type of vaccine used. The highest rates were reported for AstraZeneca, followed by Sputnik V. In regression analysis, the vaccine brand, female gender and initial COVID-19 severity were the main determinants for predicting post-vaccination headache. CONCLUSION: Participants commonly experienced a headache following vaccination against COVID-19. Our study results indicated that this was slightly more common in females and in those with a history of severe COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Iran/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Health Personnel
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 16(5)2023 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317273

ABSTRACT

A fit and well young man presented to our emergency department in the UK. On examination, he had an isolated left-sided ptosis; he had a 3-day history of frontal headache which was worse on head movement. He lacked any clinical signs of cranial, orbital, or preseptal infection, and his eye movements were normal. Ten days before presentation, he tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Inflammatory markers were moderately raised, and CT of the head did not reveal any vascular abnormality or intracranial lesion. Imaging revealed opacification, predominantly in the left facial sinuses, keeping with sinusitis. He was discharged the same evening with oral antibiotics and made a full recovery over the next few days. He remained well at 6-month follow-up. The authors convey their findings to raise awareness of a rare complication of sinusitis and to demonstrate the utility of CT imaging for diagnosing sinusitis and ruling out severe pathology.


Subject(s)
Blepharoptosis , COVID-19 , Sinusitis , Male , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinusitis/diagnosis , Sinusitis/diagnostic imaging , Blepharoptosis/etiology , Blepharoptosis/diagnosis , Headache/etiology
9.
Pain Physician ; 26(3): E223-E231, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316486

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (tMS) offer a novel noninvasive treatment option for chronic pain. While the recent COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus resulted in a temporary interruption of the treatments for patients, it provided an excellent opportunity to assess the long-term sustainability of the treatment, and the feasibility of resuming the treatments after a brief period of interruption as no such data are available in current literature. METHODS: First, a list of patients whose pain/headache conditions have been stably controlled with either treatment for at least 6 months prior to the 3-month pandemic-related shutdown was generated. Those who returned for treatments after the shutdown were identified and their underlying pain diagnoses, pre- and posttreatment Mechanical Visual Analog Scale (M-VAS) pain scores, 3-item Pain, Enjoyment, and General Activity (PEG-3), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores were assessed in 3 phases: Phase I (P1) consisted of a 6-month pre-COVID-19 period in which pain conditions were stably managed with either treatment modality; Phase II (P2) consisted of the first treatment visit period immediately after COVID-19 shutdown; and Phase III (P3) consisted of a 3-4 month post-COVID-19 shutdown period patients received up to 3 sessions of either treatment modality after the P2 treatment. RESULTS: For pre- and posttreatment M-VAS pain scores, mixed-effect analyses for both treatment groups demonstrated significant (P < 0.01) time interactions across all phases. For pretreatment M-VAS pain scores, TMS (n = 27) between-phase analyses indicated a significant (F = 13.572, P = 0.002) increase from 37.7 ± 27.6 at P1 to 49.6 ± 25.9 at P2, which then decreased significantly (F = 12.752, P = 0.001) back to an average score of 37.1 ± 24.7 at P3. Similarly, tMS (n = 25) between-phase analyses indicated the mean pretreatment pain score (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) increased significantly (F = 13.383, P = 0.003) from 34.9 ± 25.1 at P1 to 56.3 ± 27.0 at P2, which then decreased significantly (F = 5.464, P = 0.027) back to an average score of 41.9 ± 26.4 at P3. For posttreatment pain scores, the TMS group between-phase analysis indicated the mean posttreatment pain score (mean ± SD) increased significantly (F = 14.206, P = 0.002) from 25.6 ± 22.9 at P1 to 36.2 ± 23.4 at P2, which then significantly decreased (F = 16.063, P < 0.001) back to an average score of 23.2 ± 21.3 at P3. The tMS group between-phase analysis indicates a significant (F = 8.324, P = 0.012) interaction between P1 and P2 only with the mean posttreatment pain score (mean ± SD) increased from 24.9 ± 25.7 at P1 to 36.9 ± 26.7 at P2. The combined PEG-3 score between-phase analyses demonstrated similar significant (P < 0.001) changes across the phases in both treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both TMS and tMS treatment interruptions resulted in an increase of pain/headache severity and interference of quality of life and functions. However, the pain/headache symptoms, patients' quality of life, or function can quickly be improved once the maintenance treatments were restarted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation/methods , Headache/etiology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Chronic Pain/etiology , Treatment Outcome
10.
Cephalalgia ; 43(5): 3331024231173354, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent pharmacovigilance studies suggested that cluster headache could be a potential adverse effect after coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccination; however, the possibility of coincidence could not be excluded. Detailed case studies might help elucidate their potential link and implicate potential pathogenic mechanisms. METHODS: Patients who developed cluster headache in close temporal relationship to COVID-19 vaccination were identified from two tertiary medical centers in Japan and Taiwan respectively through 2021-2022. Detailed characteristics of the headaches and time between the onset of the index cluster episode and antecedent COVID-19 vaccination were reported. In patients with previous cluster headaches, the duration from previous bout was also recorded. RESULTS: Six patients with new cluster headache bout 3-17 days after COVID-19 vaccination were identified. Two of them were de novo cases. The others either had been attack-free for a long time or developed new cluster bout in seasons atypical to prior bouts. The vaccines included mRNA, viral vector, or protein subunit vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccines, regardless of vaccine types, may elicit de novo or relapse of cluster headache. Future studies are needed to confirm the potential causality and explore the potential pathogenic mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cluster Headache , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/adverse effects , Headache/etiology
11.
Rev Alerg Mex ; 67(4): 338-349, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293749

ABSTRACT

The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are reminiscent of those of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by cytokine release syndrome and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is observed in patients with other coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. Neurologists face the challenge of assessing patients with pre-existing neurological diseases who have contracted SARS-CoV-2, patients with COVID-19 who present neurological emergencies, and patients who are carriers of the virus and have developed secondary neurological complications, either during the course of the disease or after it. Some authors and recent literature reports suggest that the presence of neurological manifestations in patients who are carriers of SARS-CoV-2 may be associated with a greater severity of the disease.


Las manifestaciones clínicas de COVID-19 recuerdan las del síndrome de insuficiencia respiratoria aguda inducido por el síndrome de liberación de citocinas y la linfohistiocitosis hemofagocitica observada en pacientes con otros coronavirus como SARS-CoV y MERS-CoV. Los neurólogos tienen el reto de evaluar pacientes con enfermedades neurológicas preexistentes que contraen SARS-CoV-2, pacientes con COVID-19 que presentan emergencias neurológicas y pacientes portadores del virus que desarrollan complicaciones neurológicas secundarias, durante el curso de la enfermedad o posterior a la misma. Algunos autores y reportes en la literatura recientes sugieren que las manifestaciones neurológicas en pacientes portadores de SARS-CoV-2 pueden asociarse con mayor gravedad de la enfermedad.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adaptive Immunity , Anosmia/etiology , Blood-Brain Barrier , Brain Ischemia/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Encephalitis, Viral/etiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Leukocytes/immunology , Organ Specificity , Viral Tropism
12.
Phys Ther ; 103(4)2023 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299692

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this case report is to describe the main components of the history and physical examination that led to idiopathic intracranial hypertension differential diagnosis, which initially was investigated as COVID-19. METHODS (CASE DESCRIPTION): A 28-year-old woman complaining of constant headache and loss of smell and taste was suspected as SARS-CoV-2 infection by her general practitioner. She underwent 3 molecular swab tests, all negative, then decided to seek her physical therapist for relieving headache. RESULTS: The full cranial nerve examination revealed impaired olfactory (CNI), abducens (CN VI), and facial (CN VII) nerves, leading the physical therapist to refer the patient to a neurosurgeon for a suspected central nervous system involvement. The neurosurgeon prescribed a detailed MRI and an ophthalmologic examination, which allowed for the final diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. CONCLUSION: An urgent lumbo-peritoneal shunting surgery resolved the patient's symptoms and saved her sight. Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, health care professionals must pay attention to properly investigating patients' signs and symptoms using comprehensive clinical reasoning, considering the screening for referral to specialist medical attention. IMPACT: A thorough physical examination is required for every patient even if patients' signs and symptoms are in line with apparent common and widespread pathologies. Cranial nerve evaluation is an essential component of the physical therapist assessment and decision-making process. The ongoing pandemic highlighted the fundamental assistance of physical therapists toward physicians in the screening and management of musculoskeletal diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papilledema , Pseudotumor Cerebri , Humans , Female , Adult , Pseudotumor Cerebri/diagnosis , Pseudotumor Cerebri/surgery , Papilledema/diagnosis , Papilledema/etiology , Papilledema/surgery , Anosmia/complications , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/diagnosis , Vision Disorders/etiology , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/etiology
13.
J Med Case Rep ; 17(1): 158, 2023 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292710

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Susac syndrome is an immune-mediated, ischemia-producing, occlusive microvascular endotheliopathy that threatens the brain, retina, and inner ear. There is a need for disease assessment tools that can help clinicians and patients to more easily, accurately, and uniformly track the clinical course and outcome of Susac syndrome. Ideally, such tools should simultaneously facilitate the clinical care and study of Susac syndrome and improve the value of future case reports. To meet this need, two novel clinical assessment tools were developed: the Susac Symptoms Form and the Susac Disease Damage Score. The former is a comprehensive self-report form that is completed by patients/families to serially document the clinical status of a patient. The latter documents the extent of damage perceived by individual patients/families and their physicians. Both forms were initially trialed with two particularly representative and instructive patients. The results of this trial are shared in this report. CASE PRESENTATION: Patient 1 is a 21-year-old Caucasian female who presented with an acute onset of headache, paresthesias, cognitive dysfunction, and emotional lability. Patient 2 is a 14-year-old Caucasian female who presented with an acute onset of headache, cognitive dysfunction, urinary incontinence, ataxia, and personality change. Both patients fulfilled criteria for a definite diagnosis of Susac syndrome: both eventually developed brain, retinal, and inner ear involvement, and both had typical "snowball lesions" on magnetic resonance imaging. The Susac Symptoms Form documented initial improvement in both patients, was sufficiently sensitive in detecting a subsequent relapse in the second patient, and succinctly documented the long-term clinical course in both patients. The Disease Damage Score documented minimal disease damage in the first patient and more significant damage in the second. CONCLUSIONS: The Susac Symptoms Form and the Disease Damage Score are useful disease assessment tools, both for clinical care and research purposes. Their use could enhance the value of future case reports on Susac syndrome and could improve opportunities to learn from a series of such reports.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Susac Syndrome , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Adolescent , Susac Syndrome/diagnosis , Susac Syndrome/complications , Susac Syndrome/pathology , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , Disease Progression , Headache/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
14.
J Neurol Sci ; 449: 120646, 2023 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304531

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Uniform case definitions are required to ensure harmonised reporting of neurological syndromes associated with SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, it is unclear how clinicians perceive the relative importance of SARS-CoV-2 in neurological syndromes, which risks under- or over-reporting. METHODS: We invited clinicians through global networks, including the World Federation of Neurology, to assess ten anonymised vignettes of SARS-CoV-2 neurological syndromes. Using standardised case definitions, clinicians assigned a diagnosis and ranked association with SARS-CoV-2. We compared diagnostic accuracy and assigned association ranks between different settings and specialties and calculated inter-rater agreement for case definitions as "poor" (κ ≤ 0.4), "moderate" or "good" (κ > 0.6). RESULTS: 1265 diagnoses were assigned by 146 participants from 45 countries on six continents. The highest correct proportion were cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, 95.8%), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, 92.4%) and headache (91.6%) and the lowest encephalitis (72.8%), psychosis (53.8%) and encephalopathy (43.2%). Diagnostic accuracy was similar between neurologists and non-neurologists (median score 8 vs. 7/10, p = 0.1). Good inter-rater agreement was observed for five diagnoses: cranial neuropathy, headache, myelitis, CVST, and GBS and poor agreement for encephalopathy. In 13% of vignettes, clinicians incorrectly assigned lowest association ranks, regardless of setting and specialty. CONCLUSION: The case definitions can help with reporting of neurological complications of SARS-CoV-2, also in settings with few neurologists. However, encephalopathy, encephalitis, and psychosis were often misdiagnosed, and clinicians underestimated the association with SARS-CoV-2. Future work should refine the case definitions and provide training if global reporting of neurological syndromes associated with SARS-CoV-2 is to be robust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Encephalitis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Nervous System Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Observer Variation , Uncertainty , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Encephalitis/complications , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , COVID-19 Testing
15.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 219: 107339, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headache is the most common COVID-19-related neurological symptom. We investigated the characteristics of COVID-19-related headache and their relationship with clinical severity in Kirsehir Province, Turkey. METHODS: This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled 226 COVID-19-positive patients who developed headache during acute infection. Demographic data, headache characteristics, and infection symptoms were recorded. The clinical severity of COVID-19 was documented in each participant. RESULT: New-onset COVID-19-related headaches lasting 4 days were reported in 164 patients (72.5 %); these were mostly bilaterally or localized to the forehead (58.4 %), pulsating (42.5 %), moderate to severe intensity (30.1 %), with a partial response to paracetamol (23.5 %). The other 62 patients (27.4 %) reported headaches before COVID-19. Their COVID-related headaches were fiery type (p = 0.025), of very severe intensity (p = 0.008), had a holocranial distribution (p = 0.004), and were less response to paracetamol (p = 0.003); the headaches were significantly more frequent after COVID-19 than before COVID-19. Older age, high body mass index, and low education level were significantly higher in the severe group (all p < 0.001). Female sex (p = 0.019) and being a healthcare worker (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent in mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral, prolonged, moderate to severe headaches that were analgesic resistant are more frequent in patients with COVID-19 infection. Further study should examine whether the headache characteristics distinguish COVID-19-related headaches from other types, particularly in asymptomatic subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Can J Neurol Sci ; 48(1): 9-24, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278901

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Albeit primarily a disease of respiratory tract, the 2019 coronavirus infectious disease (COVID-19) has been found to have causal association with a plethora of neurological, neuropsychiatric and psychological effects. This review aims to analyze them with a discussion of evolving therapeutic recommendations. METHODS: PubMed and Google Scholar were searched from 1 January 2020 to 30 May 2020 with the following key terms: "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2", "pandemic", "neuro-COVID", "stroke-COVID", "epilepsy-COVID", "COVID-encephalopathy", "SARS-CoV-2-encephalitis", "SARS-CoV-2-rhabdomyolysis", "COVID-demyelinating disease", "neurological manifestations", "psychosocial manifestations", "treatment recommendations", "COVID-19 and therapeutic changes", "psychiatry", "marginalised", "telemedicine", "mental health", "quarantine", "infodemic" and "social media". A few newspaper reports related to COVID-19 and psychosocial impacts have also been added as per context. RESULTS: Neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations of COVID-19 are abundant. Clinical features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement are evident. These have been categorically analyzed briefly with literature support. Most of the psychological effects are secondary to pandemic-associated regulatory, socioeconomic and psychosocial changes. CONCLUSION: Neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations of this disease are only beginning to unravel. This demands a wide index of suspicion for prompt diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 to prevent further complications and mortality.


Les impacts neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques d'une infection à la COVID-19. CONTEXTE: Bien qu'il s'agisse principalement d'une maladie des voies respiratoires, la maladie infectieuse à coronavirus apparue en 2019 (COVID-19) s'est avérée avoir un lien de causalité avec une pléthore d'impacts d'ordre neurologique, neuropsychiatrique et psychologique. Cette étude entend donc analyser ces impacts tout en discutant l'évolution des recommandations thérapeutiques se rapportant à cette maladie. MÉTHODES: Les bases de données PubMed et Google Scholar ont été interrogées entre les 1er janvier et 30 mai 2020. Les termes clés suivants ont été utilisés : « COVID-19 ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ¼, « Pandémie ¼, « Neuro ­ COVID ¼, « AVC ­ COVID ¼, « Épilepsie ­ COVID ¼, « COVID ­ encéphalopathie ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ­ encéphalite ¼, « SRAS ­ CoV-2 ­ rhabdomyolyse ¼, « COVID ­ maladie démyélinisante ¼, « Manifestations neurologiques ¼, « Manifestations psychosociales ¼, « Recommandations thérapeutiques ¼, « COVID-19 et changement thérapeutiques ¼, « Psychiatrie ¼, « Marginalisés ¼, « Télémédecine ¼, « Santé mentale ¼, « Quarantaine ¼, « Infodémique ¼ et « Médias sociaux ¼. De plus, quelques articles de journaux relatifs à la pandémie de COVID-19 et à ses impacts psychosociaux ont également été ajoutés en fonction du contexte. RÉSULTATS: Il appert que les manifestations neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques des infections à la COVID-19 sont nombreuses. Les caractéristiques cliniques d'une implication des systèmes nerveux central et périphérique sautent désormais aux yeux. Ces caractéristiques ont fait l'objet d'une brève analyse systématique à l'aide de publications scientifiques. En outre, la plupart des impacts d'ordre psychologique de cette pandémie se sont révélés moins apparents que les changements réglementaires, socioéconomiques et psychosociaux. CONCLUSION: Les manifestations neurologiques et neuropsychiatriques de cette maladie ne font que commencer à être élucidées. Cela exige donc une capacité accrue de vigilance en vue d'un diagnostic rapide, et ce, afin de prévenir des complications additionnelles et une mortalité accrue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Ageusia/etiology , Ageusia/physiopathology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Anosmia/etiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Brain Diseases , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cerebellar Ataxia/etiology , Cerebellar Ataxia/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Delivery of Health Care , Demyelinating Diseases/therapy , Disease Management , Dizziness/etiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Epilepsy/therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Headache/etiology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Hypoxia, Brain/physiopathology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Meningoencephalitis/etiology , Meningoencephalitis/physiopathology , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Muscular Diseases/physiopathology , Myelitis, Transverse/etiology , Myelitis, Transverse/physiopathology , Myoclonus/etiology , Myoclonus/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Polyneuropathies/etiology , Polyneuropathies/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/etiology , Seizures/physiopathology , Stroke/therapy , Viral Tropism
17.
Can J Neurol Sci ; 48(1): 66-76, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2270849

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Growing evidence showed that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection may present with neurological manifestations. This review aimed to determine the neurological manifestations and complications in COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis that included cohort and case series/reports involving a population of patients confirmed with COVID-19 infection and their neurologic manifestations. We searched the following electronic databases until April 18, 2020: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and World Health Organization database (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020180658). RESULTS: From 403 articles identified, 49 studies involving a total of 6,335 confirmed COVID-19 cases were included. The random-effects modeling analysis for each neurological symptom showed the following proportional point estimates with 95% confidence intervals: "headache" (0.12; 0.10-0.14; I2 = 77%), "dizziness" (0.08; 0.05-0.12; I2 = 82%), "headache and dizziness" (0.09; 0.06-0.13; I2 = 0%), "nausea" (0.07; 0.04-0.11; I2 = 79%), "vomiting" (0.05; 0.03-0.08; I2 = 74%), "nausea and vomiting" (0.06; 0.03-0.11; I2 = 83%), "confusion" (0.05; 0.02-0.14; I2 = 86%), and "myalgia" (0.21; 0.18-0.25; I2 = 85%). The most common neurological complication associated with COVID-19 infection was vascular disorders (n = 23); other associated conditions were encephalopathy (n = 3), encephalitis (n = 1), oculomotor nerve palsy (n = 1), isolated sudden-onset anosmia (n = 1), Guillain-Barré syndrome (n = 1), and Miller-Fisher syndrome (n = 2). Most patients with neurological complications survived (n = 14); a considerable number of patients died (n = 7); and the rest had unclear outcomes (n = 12). CONCLUSION: This review revealed that neurologic involvement may manifest in COVID-19 infection. What has initially been thought of as a primarily respiratory illness has evolved into a wide-ranging multi-organ disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Anosmia/etiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Brain Diseases/etiology , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Cerebral Infarction/etiology , Cerebral Infarction/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Confusion/etiology , Confusion/physiopathology , Dizziness/etiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Encephalitis/etiology , Encephalitis/physiopathology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Myalgia/etiology , Nausea/etiology , Nausea/physiopathology , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/etiology , Oculomotor Nerve Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/etiology , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/physiopathology , Vomiting/etiology , Vomiting/physiopathology
18.
Rev Neurol ; 76(7): 227-233, 2023 04 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2270239

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The role of the central and peripheral nervous system in the generation of migraine is not well understood. Our aim was to determine whether peripheral trigeminal nerve stimuli, such as nasopharyngeal swabs, could trigger migraine attacks. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A survey was sent to 658 doctors, nurses and medical students, asking about the presence of headache suggestive of migraine after carrying out a SARS-CoV-2 swab test, their previous history of migraine, and demographic and headache-related characteristics. Those who tested positive or had associated clinical signs and symptoms of COVID were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 377 people were recruited, 309 of whom were included in the sample. Forty-seven (15.2%) reported headache suggestive of migraine after the swab test and 42 (89.4%) of them had a previous history of migraine. The risk of developing migraine was higher in the subgroup of patients with a history of headache suggestive of migraine - odds ratio: 22.6 (95% confidence interval: 8.597-59.397); p < 0.001. No differences were found between the main characteristics of attacks suggestive of migraine before and after the swab test, except for a lower percentage of associated aura afterwards (42.8% vs. 26.1%; p = 0.016). Individuals with previous attacks suggestive of migraine with a frequency of more than two episodes per month had a higher risk of developing a headache suggestive of migraine after the test - odds ratio = 2.353 (95% confidence interval: 1.077-5.145); p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Nasopharyngeal swabbing may trigger migraine attacks, with a greater likelihood in individuals with a higher frequency of previous migraines. This would confirm the idea that peripheral stimuli on the trigeminal nerve can trigger migraine attacks in individuals with migraine, according to their degree of trigeminovascular sensitisation.


TITLE: Estimulación periférica del nervio trigémino mediante frotis nasofaríngeo como posible desencadenante de migraña.Introducción. La implicación del sistema nervioso central y periférico en la generación de la migraña no se conoce bien. Nuestro objetivo fue determinar si estímulos periféricos sobre el nervio trigémino, como el frotis nasofaríngeo, podrían desencadenar ataques de migraña. Sujetos y métodos. Se envió una encuesta a 658 médicos, enfermeras y estudiantes de medicina, preguntando por la presencia de cefalea sugestiva de migraña tras la realización de un frotis para la determinación del SARS-CoV-2, su historia previa de migraña, y sobre características demográficas y relacionadas con la cefalea. Los que tenían resultado positivo o que asociaban sintomatología de COVID fueron excluidos. Resultados. Se reclutó a 377 personas y se incluyó a 309. Cuarenta y siete (15,2%) refirieron cefalea sugestiva de migraña tras la realización del frotis, de las cuales 42 (89,4%) tenían historia previa de migraña. El riesgo de desarrollarla fue mayor en el subgrupo de pacientes con cefalea sugestiva de migraña previa ­razón de probabilidad: 22,6 (intervalo de confianza al 95%: 8,597-59,397); p < 0,001­. No hubo diferencias entre las características principales de los ataques sugestivos de migraña previos y los desencadenados tras la prueba, excepto un porcentaje menor de aura asociada tras el frotis (42,8% frente a 26,1%; p = 0,016). Los individuos con ataques sugestivos de migraña previos con frecuencia superior a dos episodios mensuales presentaron mayor riesgo de desarrollar una cefalea sugestiva de migraña tras el test ­razón de probabilidad = 2,353 (intervalo de confianza al 95%: 1,077-5,145); p = 0,03­. Conclusiones. El frotis nasofaríngeo podría desencadenar ataques de migraña, más probablemente en individuos con mayor frecuencia de migrañas previas. Esto confirmaría que estímulos periféricos sobre el nervio trigémino pueden desencadenar ataques de migraña en individuos con migraña, de acuerdo con su grado de sensibilización trigeminovascular.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/etiology , Headache/etiology , Trigeminal Nerve
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(11): e33236, 2023 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268212

ABSTRACT

Due to the urgency of controlling the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, coronavirus disease 2019 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines have been expeditiously approved and introduced in several countries without sufficient evaluation for adverse events. We analyzed adverse events among Korean healthcare workers who received all 3 doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. This survey was conducted among hospital workers of Inha University Hospital who had received the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine for their first, second, third rounds, and using a diary card. The surveyed adverse events included local (redness, edema, and injection site pain) and systemic (fever, fatigue, headache, chill, myalgia, arthralgia, vomiting, diarrhea, pruritis, and urticaria) side effects and were divided into 5 grades (Grade 0 = none - Grade 4 = critical). Based on adverse events reported at least once after any of the 3 doses, the most common systemic adverse reactions were chills and headache (respectively, 62.6%, 62.4%), followed by myalgia (55.3%), arthralgia (53.4%), fatigue (51.6%), pruritus (38.1%), and fever (36.5%). The frequency and duration of adverse events were significantly greater in women (P < .05) than men. Except for redness, pruritus, urticaria, and most adverse reactions had a higher rate of occurrence after the third dose in subjects who also had reactions with the second dose. However, grade 4 adverse events did occur with the third dose in some patients, even if there were no side effects with the first and second doses. Adverse events experienced with the first and second doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in Korean healthcare workers increased the incidence of adverse events at the time of the third dose. On the other hand, grade 4 adverse events could still occur with the third dose even though there were no side effects with the first and second doses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Urticaria , Male , Humans , Female , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Arthralgia , Fatigue , Fever , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
20.
J Korean Med Sci ; 38(11): e83, 2023 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265094

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate the factors associated with neurological manifestations of post-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) conditions. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from 440 patients who visited our post-COVID-19 clinic more than 4 weeks after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. We analyzed the prevalence of different neurological symptoms (brain fog, memory impairment, headache, and dizziness) and assessed the associated factors. RESULTS: Brain fog was the most common symptom, observed in 170 patients (38.6%), followed by headaches (n = 137, 31.1%), dizziness (n = 128, 29%), and memory impairment (n = 104, 23.6%). Brain fog was associated with hyposmia or hypogeusia (odds ratio [OR], 2.54; P < 0.001), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) (OR, 1.06; P < 0.001), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (OR, 1.09; P = 0.037). Memory impairment was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.83; P < 0.001), FSS (OR, 1.05; P < 0.001), and age (OR, 1.02; P = 0.015). Headache was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.28; P = 0.001), sex (OR, 1.68; P = 0.042), and FSS (OR, 1.04; P < 0.001). Dizziness was associated with sleep problems (OR, 2.88; P < 0.001), and FSS (OR, 1.04; P < 0.001). The incidence of brain fog (P < 0.001), memory impairment (P < 0.001), dizziness (P = 0.007), and headache (P = 0.045) accompanied by hyposmia and hypogeusia was higher in patients with the aforementioned symptoms than in those without. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that there is a relationship between neurological symptoms and other clinical factors, such as fatigue, depression, anxiety, hyposmia, and hypogeusia.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Dizziness/complications , Retrospective Studies , Ageusia/etiology , Anosmia/etiology , Headache/etiology , Headache/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Fatigue/etiology
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