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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(49): e28174, 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566098

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease which making people difficult to breathe and often accompanied with headache. Acupuncture have been proved the therapeutic effect on headache, but there has been no high-quality evidence on acupuncture for the headache in COVID-19. This study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for headache in COVID-19. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials from December 2019 to July 2021 will be included without restrictions on language or publication date. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Databases, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang database, and VIP database will be searched. Two researchers will independently select studies, extract data and evaluate study quality. Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized trials will be used to assess the risk of bias of included studies. Statistical analyses will be performed using the Review Manager V.5.3 and stata 14.0. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study will not involve personal information. Ethical approval will not be required. We will publish the results in a peer-reviewed journal. PROSPERO TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021270722.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19/complications , Headache/complications , Headache/therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Neurol Sci ; 43(3): 1575-1582, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first COVID-19 lockdown in Italy, it was observed a reduction in emergency department (ED) attendances due to non-SARS-COV-2-related acute/chronic conditions. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on patients reporting headache as the principal presenting symptom on admission to the ED of the tertiary care University Hospital of Trieste over the relevant period. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the frequency, features, and management of ED attendances for headache during the COVID-19 lockdown from 8 March to 31 May 2020, comparing it with the pre-lockdown period (January-February 2020) and the first 5 months of 2019. RESULTS: A reduction in ED total attendances was observed in the first 5 months of 2020 compared to the same period in 2019 (21.574 and 30.364, respectively; - 29%), in particular with respect to headache-related attendances (174 and 339 respectively; - 49%). During the COVID-19 lockdown, it was recorded a minor reduction in the ED access rate of female patients (p = 0.03), while no significant variation was detected in repeaters' prevalence, diagnostic assessment, and acute treatment. The ratio of not otherwise specified, secondary, and primary headaches (48.4%, 30.6%, and 21.0% respectively) remained unchanged during the COVID-19 lockdown, in comparison to the control periods. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the number of ED attendances for headache but not their management and setting. Despite a reduction of accesses for headache due to the pandemic emergency, the distribution of headache subtypes and the rate of repeaters did not change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 25(11): 73, 2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527506

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Headache is a common symptom of COVID-19 with emerging literature being published on the subject. Although it may seem unspecific, scientific evidence has allowed a better definition of this headache type, revealing relevant associations with other COVID-19 symptoms and prognoses. We therefore sought to highlight the most remarkable findings concerning headache secondary to COVID-19, specifically focusing on epidemiology, characteristics, pathophysiology, and treatments. RECENT FINDINGS: The real prevalence of headache as a symptom of COVID-19 is still unclear ranging from 10 to 70%. Headache mainly has a tension-type-like phenotype, although 25% of individuals present with migraine-like features that also occur in patients without personal migraine history. This finding suggests that a likely pathophysiological mechanism is the activation of the trigeminovascular system. SARS-CoV-2 neurotropism can occur by trans-synaptic invasion through the olfactory route from the nasal cavity, leading to anosmia which has been associated with headache. SARS-CoV-2 protein has been found not only in olfactory mucosa and bulbs but also in trigeminal branches and the trigeminal ganglion, supporting this hypothesis. However, other mechanisms such as brain vessels inflammation due to SARS-CoV-2 damage to the endothelium or systemic inflammation in the context of cytokine storm cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, headache has been associated with lower COVID-19 mortality. No specific treatment for COVID-19 headache is available at present. Studies show that investigating COVID-19 headache represents an opportunity not only to better understand COVID-19 in general but also to advance in the knowledge of both secondary and primary headaches. Future research is therefore warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular , Headache/etiology , Headache/physiopathology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Inflammation , Migraine Disorders/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tension-Type Headache/physiopathology , Trigeminal Ganglion/physiopathology , Trigeminal Ganglion/virology , Trigeminal Nerve/physiopathology , Trigeminal Nerve/virology , Viral Tropism
4.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 210: 106985, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a global issue now, can have a variety of clinical manifestations. Hundreds of articles have discussed different aspects of this infectious disease, such as physiopathology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and treatment protocols. Recently, neurological manifestations of the disease have been found to be pretty common among COVID-19 patients. Here, neurological symptoms of COVID-19 infection with a focus on non-cerebrovascular complications are discussed in a large study population. METHODS: Neurological symptoms of 891hospitalized COVID-19 patients from March to June 2020 in a major Hospital, Tehran, Iran, were reviewed. Demographic characteristics and neurological manifestations were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 891 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the following symptoms were observed: headache (63.9%), sleeping problems (51.3%), hyposmia/anosmia (46%), dizziness (45.4%), hypogeusia (42.1%), memory issues (31.5%), auditory disturbances (17.5%), paralysis (3.7%) and seizures (1.7%). In 29.7% of the patients, a neurological symptom was the initiating symptoms of the infection. Females were more likely to show headache and dizziness compared to males (p value<0.05). Headache intensity was also higher in females compared to males (p value<0.05). Headache prevalence was lower in older patients (p value<0.05), while memory loss and impaired consciousness were higher by increasing age (p values=0.002 and 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Neurological manifestations were common among COVID-19 patients under study. Headache, as the most common neurological symptom among COVID-19 patients, was the most prevalent and intense among the female population. Headache, dizziness, sleeping problems, hyposmia/anosmia and hypogeusia were common COVID-19 neurological manifestations, while memory issues, auditory disturbances, paralysis, and seizures were less common.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dizziness/diagnosis , Dizziness/epidemiology , Dizziness/therapy , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/epidemiology , Seizures/therapy , Young Adult
5.
Pain Med ; 23(1): 164-188, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455341

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of percutaneous interventional treatments for prevention of migraine through a qualitative and (when possible) quantitative analysis. METHODS: An expert panel was asked to develop recommendations for the multidisciplinary preventive treatment of migraine, including interventional strategies. The committee conducted a systematic review and (when evidence was sufficient) a meta-analytic review by using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) criteria and the modified Cochrane Risk of Bias analysis available in the Covidence data management program. Clinical questions addressed adults with migraine who should be offered prevention. Examined outcomes included headache days, acute medication use, and functional impairment. Acute management of migraine was outside the scope of this guideline. RESULTS: The committee screened 1,195 studies and assessed 352 by full text, yielding 16 randomized controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria. RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: As informed by evidence related to the preselected outcomes, adverse event profile, cost, and values and preferences of patients, onabotulinumtoxinA received a strong recommendation for its use for chronic migraine prevention and a weak recommendation against its use for episodic migraine prevention. Greater occipital nerve blocks received a weak recommendation for their use for chronic migraine prevention. For greater occipital nerve block, steroid received a weak recommendation against its use vs the use of local anesthetic alone. Occipital nerve with supraorbital nerve blocks, sphenopalatine ganglion blocks, cervical spine percutaneous interventions, and implantable stimulation all received weak recommendations for their use for chronic migraine prevention. The committee found insufficient evidence to assess trigger point injections in migraine prevention and highly discouraged the use of intrathecal medication.


Subject(s)
Migraine Disorders , Adult , Anesthetics, Local , Cervical Vertebrae , Headache/therapy , Humans , Injections , Migraine Disorders/prevention & control
6.
J Headache Pain ; 22(Suppl 1): 103, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435219
7.
Neuropediatrics ; 52(4): 242-251, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287846

ABSTRACT

Neurological emergencies account for about one-third of the highest severity codes attributed in emergency pediatric departments. About 75% of children with acute neurological symptoms presents with seizures, headache, or other paroxysmal events. Life-threatening conditions involve a minor proportion of patients (e.g., less than 15% of children with headache and less than 5% of children with febrile seizures). This review highlights updated insights about clinical features, diagnostic workup, and therapeutic management of pediatric neurological emergencies. Particularly, details will be provided about the most recent insights about headache, febrile seizures, status epilepticus, altered levels of consciousness, acute motor impairment, acute movement disorders, and functional disorders, as well as the role of diagnostic tools (e.g., neuroimaging, lumbar puncture, and electroencephalography), in the emergency setting. Moreover, the impact of the current novel coronavirus disease2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the evaluation of pediatric neurologic emergencies will also be analyzed.


Subject(s)
Acute Disease , Headache/diagnosis , Seizures/diagnosis , Status Epilepticus/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Child , Emergencies , Headache/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Seizures/therapy , Status Epilepticus/therapy
8.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 25(8): 53, 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269179

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Personal protection equipment (PPE)-associated headache is an unusual secondary headache disorder that predominantly occurs in healthcare workers as a consequence of the donning of protective respirators, face masks and/or eyewear. The appreciation of this entity is important given the significant ramifications upon the occupational health of healthcare workers and could additionally have an impact on persons living with pre-existing headache disorder(s). RECENT FINDINGS: There has been a renewed interest and recognition of PPE-associated headaches amongst healthcare professionals, largely brought about by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic which has besieged healthcare systems worldwide. De novo PPE-associated headaches may present with migrainous or tension-type features and can be viewed as a subtype of external compression headache. The prognosis of the disorder is generally favourable, given that most headaches are short-lived without long-term sequalae. Several aetiologies have been postulated to account for the development of these headaches. Notably, these headaches can affect the occupational health and work performance of healthcare workers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, probable etiopathogenesis, management and prognosis of PPE-associated headaches in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Future directions for research and PPE development are proposed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Headache/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Humans
9.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(11): 3798-3804, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228751

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Literature regarding headache teleconsultation and patient satisfaction is scarce. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic led to the restructuring of traditional clinical activity by adopting telemedicine. Our objectives were to evaluate patients' satisfaction with headache teleconsultation by telephone during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and assess patients' preferred model of appointment (face-to-face, teleconsultation by telephone, or both). METHODS: Patients with a previous diagnosis of primary headache or neuropathies and facial pain disorders, and at least one telephone headache visit during the first wave of COVID-19, filled out an online questionnaire regarding sociodemographic parameters, satisfaction with teleconsultation, and preferred model of appointment. RESULTS: We included 83 patients (valid response rate of 64.3%); most had migraine (83.1%). Regarding teleconsultation, 81.9% considered this model adequate for follow-up, 88.0% were satisfied with the information provided about the disease/treatment, and 73.5% were satisfied with the medication modification. Ninety percent would agree with a new tele-evaluation if stable after the pandemic. The mixed model was the preferred medical consultation type for the postpandemic period (43.4%), followed by face-to-face visits (33.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients were satisfied with the headache teleconsultation during the COVID-19 era. However, an exclusive model of telemedicine does not seem suitable for monitoring all patients. A mixed approach could be integrated into clinical practice after the pandemic to optimize health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Remote Consultation , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Braz J Anesthesiol ; 71(6): 667-669, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210112

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, and headache is reported in 6.5% to 34% of all cases. There is little published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of COVID-19 headache. This case series presents six COVID-19 infected patients with refractory headache in which intranasal bedside Sphenopalatine Ganglion Block was performed for analgesia. All patients had a reduction in headache intensity from severe to mild or no pain after the procedure with minor transient side effects. Proposed mechanisms of action include reduction of local autonomic stimuli, intracranial vasoconstriction, and reduction of vasoactive substances release in the pterygopalatine fossa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sphenopalatine Ganglion Block , Headache/etiology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(2): 440-447, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995828

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to rapid changes in the delivery of medical care worldwide. The main objective of this survey was to investigate the initial experiences of neurologists with the use of telemedicine for different neurological conditions during the first phase of the COVID-19. METHODS: All hospital-based neurologists in Norway (n = 400) were invited to a questionnaire survey by e-mail in April 2020. The study focused on telemedicine and all questions were answered with regard to the first weeks of the pandemic lockdown in Norway. RESULTS: One-hundred and thirty-five neurologists responded. Overall, 87% reported a shift toward more telemedicine, with significantly more use of telephone than video consultations for both new referrals (54% vs. 30%, P < 0.001) and follow-ups (99% vs. 50%, P < 0.001). Respondents deemed it much more professionally satisfactory to conduct follow-up consultations by telephone, than to carry out consultations with new patients by telephone (85% vs. 13%, P < 0.001). Teleconsultations were better suited for headache and epilepsy patients as compared to multiple sclerosis and movement disorder patients. There was no significant difference between residents and senior consultants regarding how they experienced teleconsultations. Female neurologists found telemedicine better and more effective than male neurologists. INTERPRETATION: Telemedicine was rapidly implemented in Norwegian neurological departments during the first weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Teleconsultations were better suited for follow-ups than for new referrals, and better for headache and epilepsy patients as compared to multiple sclerosis and movement disorder patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Neurologists , Telemedicine , Telephone , Videoconferencing , Adult , Aftercare , Epilepsy/therapy , Female , Headache/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Movement Disorders/therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Neurology , Norway , Personal Satisfaction , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Headache Pain ; 21(1): 128, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic is causing changes in delivery of medical care worldwide. It is not known how the management of headache patients was affected by the lockdown during the pandemic. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic affected the hospital management of headache in Denmark and Norway. METHODS: All neurological departments in Denmark (n = 14) and Norway (n = 18) were invited to a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the lockdown and all questions were answered in regard to the period between March 12th and April 15th, 2020. RESULTS: The responder rate was 91% (29/32). Of the neurological departments 86% changed their headache practice during the lockdown. The most common change was a shift to more telephone consultations (86%). Video consultations were offered by 45%. The number of new headache referrals decreased. Only 36% administered botulinum toxin A treatment according to usual schemes. Sixty% reported that fewer patients were admitted for in-hospital emergency diagnostics and treatment. Among departments conducting headache research 57% had to halt ongoing projects. Overall, 54% reported that the standard of care was worse for headache patients during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Hospital-based headache care and research was impacted in Denmark and Norway during the initial phase of the Covid-19-pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Headache Disorders/therapy , Neurology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Botulinum Toxins, Type A/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cluster Headache/diagnosis , Cluster Headache/therapy , Denmark , Disease Management , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/therapy , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Hospital Departments , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Migraine Disorders/therapy , Neuromuscular Agents/therapeutic use , Norway , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
14.
Schmerz ; 34(6): 503-510, 2020 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840951

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially changed life worldwide in 2020. This also influences the psychological treatment options of patients with headache. AIM: The present article intends to illustrate the different psychological forms of treatment for headache patients and their implementation during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Literature review and case reports. RESULTS: Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, psychological treatment enables the increased stress level in headache patients to be counteracted by using cognitive behavioral therapy and relaxation techniques. The changed living conditions are often unfavorable but sometimes also favorable in the course of disease. It can be shown that even during the pandemic, such favorable changes can be used to support patients to cope with their headache. CONCLUSION: The digital implementation of psychological approaches makes a major contribution to maintaining psychological treatment of headache patients, so that the individually changed needs can be addressed. With respect to content, stress regulation techniques and increased acceptance gain in importance. Regarding biofeedback there are limitations, which may be overcome by improved technical devices.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Headache/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychotherapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Headache/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/therapy
15.
Headache ; 60(10): 2613-2617, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797104

ABSTRACT

In March of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic led to drastic changes in clinical practice and teaching methods. This article relates the experience of developing an almost virtual headache fellowship in response to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Pneumonia, Viral , Urology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Fellowships and Scholarships , Headache/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(37): e22179, 2020 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the effectiveness and safety of plum-blossom needle for (COVID-19) related headache is the main purpose of this systematic review protocol. METHODS: We will search the following sources for the identification of trials: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (VIP), and the Wanfang Database. The searches were limited to articles published in 2020, but no language restrictions were imposed. Only include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), with or without blinding, and participant or observer reported outcomes, will be included.The primary outcome is the time and rate of appearance of headache induced by COVID-19. The secondary outcome is the length of hospital stay. Two independent reviewers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and assessment. Review Manager Software V.5.3 will be used for the assessment of risk of bias and data synthesis. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide an evidence to judge whether plum-blossom needle is effective and safe for COVID-19-related headache. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This protocol will not evaluate individual patient information or affect patient rights and therefore does not require ethical approval. Results from this review will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and conference reports. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020199508.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , Coronavirus Infections , Headache , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Prunus domestica , Acupuncture Therapy/instrumentation , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Flowers , Headache/etiology , Headache/therapy , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Needles , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
18.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(6): 372-380, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611246

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact on healthcare systems. Spain, where headache is the main reason for outpatient neurology consultation, is one of the countries with the most reported cases of the disease. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on headache units in Spain and to evaluate how neurologists see the future of these units. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of headache units during the sixth week of the state of alarm declared in Spain in response to the pandemic. RESULTS: The response rate was 74%, with the participation of centres with different characteristics and from all Autonomous Communities of Spain. Limitations in face-to-face activity were reported by 95.8% of centres, with preferential face-to-face consultation being maintained in 60.4%, and urgent procedures in 45.8%. In 91.7% of centres, the cancelled face-to-face activity was replaced by telephone consultation. 95.8% of respondents stated that they would use personal protection equipment in the future, and 86% intended to increase the use of telemedicine. The majority foresaw an increase in waiting lists (93.8% for initial consultations, 89.6% for follow-up, and 89.4% for procedures) and a worse clinical situation for patients, but only 15% believed that their healthcare structures would be negatively affected in the future. CONCLUSIONS: As a consequence of the pandemic, headache care and research activity has reduced considerably. This demonstrates the need for an increase in the availability of telemedicine in our centres in the near future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Headache/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Management , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Forecasting , Headache/drug therapy , Headache/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Personal Protective Equipment , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment
19.
Headache ; 60(8): 1743-1746, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607684

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 health emergency has led many Headache providers to transition to virtual care overnight without preparation. We review our experience and discuss tips to bring humanity to the virtual visits.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Headache/therapy , Pandemics , Professional-Patient Relations , Telemedicine , Communication Barriers , Computer Literacy , Housing , Humans , Internet , Kinesics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Physical Distancing , Privacy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods , Telephone , Videoconferencing
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