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1.
Am J Health Behav ; 47(2): 253-260, 2023 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242938

ABSTRACT

Objective: Past infection with COVID-19 increases the risk of occurrence of thromboembolic events in veins and arteries, respiratory failure, and damage to the heart muscle, liver, and nervous system. Pro-health behaviors of patients who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2 are the determinant of maintaining and strengthening the state of health. We assessed health behaviors of convalescent patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection and determined the relationships between these behaviors and the selected social and demographic characteristics.Methods: The study included 125 patients who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2; we used the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI), and an author-constructed questionnaire.Results: Overall, 60.8% of respondents presented a mediocre level of health behaviors (5-6 stens), 24.8% low (1-4 stens), and 14.4% high (7-10 stens). We found the highest mean value in the case of one HBI category: positive psychological attitude (3.51±0.67), followed by prophylactic behaviors (3.42±0.73), and correct eating habits (3.36±0.84). The lowest value (demonstrating the least pro-health behavior of respondents) concerned health practices (3.23±0.78).Conclusions: COVID-19 convalescent patients presented a mediocre set of health behaviors. We found statistically significant relationships between health behaviors by education and age. Persons who have had SARS-CoV-2 should receive health education in all areas of health behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Behavior , Health Education , Educational Status
2.
Soc Sci Med ; 328: 116000, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328156

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health education campaigns often aim to create awareness by increasing objective knowledge about pathogens, such as COVID-19. However, the present paper proposes that confidence in one's knowledge more than knowledge is a significant factor that leads to a laxer attitude toward COVID-19 and hence lower support for protective measures and reduced intention to comply with preemptive behaviors. METHODS: We tested two hypotheses in three studies conducted between 2020 and 2022. In Study 1, we assessed participants' level of knowledge and confidence, as well as attitudes toward COVID-19. In Study 2, we tested the relation between fear of COVID-19 and protective behaviors. In Study 3, we used an experimental approach to show the causal effect of overconfidence on fear of COVID-19. In addition to manipulating overconfidence and measuring fear of COVID-19, we also measured prophylactic behaviors. RESULTS: In Study 1, more overconfident participants had a laxer attitude toward COVID-19. While knowledge had an increasing effect on worry, confidence in said knowledge significantly decreased worry about COVID-19. In Study 2, participants who were more worried about COVID-19 were more likely to engage in protective behaviors (e.g., wearing masks). In Study 3, we show that when overconfidence was experimentally diminished, fear of COVID-19 increased. The results support our claim that the effect of overconfidence on attitudes toward COVID-19 is causal in nature. Moreover, the results show that people with higher fear of COVID-19 are more likely to wear masks, use hand sanitizers, avoid crowded places or social gatherings, and get vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: Managing adherence to public health measures is critical when it comes to highly infectious diseases. Our findings suggest that efficient information campaigns to increase adherence to public health measures should focus on calibrating people's confidence in their knowledge about COVID-19 to prevent the spread of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Attitude , Health Behavior , Anxiety , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
3.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7989, 2023 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324219

ABSTRACT

To combat the public health crisis of Covid-19, governments and public health officials have been asking individuals to substantially change their behaviours for prolonged periods of time. Are happier people more willing to comply with such measures? Using independent, large-scale surveys covering about 79,000 adult respondents across 29 countries, including longitudinal data from the UK, we find that life satisfaction predicts compliance with preventive health behaviours during Covid-19 lockdowns, especially the number of weekdays stood at home (ß = 0.02, p < 0.01). The association is stronger for higher levels of life satisfaction (e.g. ß = 0.19, p < 0.01, 7 on a 0-to-10 scale). Lower life satisfaction, on the contrary, predicts lower compliance (e.g. ß = 0.02, p > 0.10, 2 on a 0-to-10 scale). We explore risk-avoidance and pro-social motivations for this relationship, and find suggestive evidence that people who are older or have certain medical preconditions seem to be behave in line with risk-avoidance, whereas motivations of people who are less at risk of Covid-19 seem more mixed. While it is difficult to estimate the relationship between life satisfaction and compliance behaviour due to potential confounders and unobserved heterogeneity, our findings suggest that life satisfaction is important, both for complying with preventive health measures and as a policy end in itself.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Happiness , Communicable Disease Control , Health Behavior , Preventive Health Services
4.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e398, 2023 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322119

ABSTRACT

As of October 2021, Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers donated over 2 million h to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The Health Belief Model (HBM) is used to understand the value a person places on preventative behavior against the risk of disease. A mixed method, unmatched, prospective case-control study was conducted regarding volunteers' experience during the pandemic, reasons why these highly trained persons volunteer, what barriers to vaccination they observed, and how they helped others overcome those barriers. The HBM can elucidate the cognitive process to vaccinate. Regression analysis found a person's attitude (which includes beliefs, peer pressure, preconceptions, unwillingness, and other indicators) is a barrier to vaccination. Service hours increased from 20 to 56 h among volunteers who saw attitude as a barrier to vaccination. Superstition and fear accounted for 99.8% of unvaccinated persons (P < 0.001). Fear was a barrier to protective health behavior. The public health system must do better to build trust as an ongoing endeavor, as even the increased service volunteers provided in response to the observed attitudes, was not enough to stem exponential transmission once the pandemic had begun. Policy-makers and the public health authority should take all necessary steps early in the pandemic to ensure the effectiveness of the vaccination program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Case-Control Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Fear , Vaccination
5.
Trials ; 23(1): 524, 2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317210

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cannabis is the most-frequently used illicit drug in Europe. Over the last few years in Spain, treatment demand has increased, yet most cannabis users do not seek treatment despite the related problems. A web-based self-help tool, like CANreduce 2.0, could help these users to control their consumption. METHODS: This study protocol describes a three-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of three approaches, in terms of reducing cannabis use among problematic cannabis users, the first two treatment arms including the Spanish version of CANreduce 2.0 (an adherence-focused, guidance-enhanced, web-based self-help tool) (1) with and (2) without psychological support; and the third group (3) treatment as usual (TAU). Study hypotheses will be tested concerning the primary outcome: change in the number of days of cannabis use over the previous week, comparing assessments at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months follow-up between groups and against baseline. Secondary outcomes related to cannabis use will be tested similarly. Mental disorders will be explored as predictors of adherence and outcomes. Analyses will be performed on an intention-to-treat basis, then verified by complete case analyses. DISCUSSION: This study will test how effective the Spanish version of CANreduce 2.0 (CANreduce-SP) is at reducing both the frequency and quantity of cannabis use in problematic users and whether adding psychological support increases its effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial is registered with the Clinical Trials Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) number: NCT04517474 . Registered 18 August 2020, (Archived by archive.is https://archive.is/N1Y64 ). The project commenced in November 2020 and recruitment is anticipated to end by November 2022.


Subject(s)
Cannabis , Counseling , Marijuana Abuse , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Health Behavior , Humans , Internet , Marijuana Abuse/therapy , Mental Disorders , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
6.
Health Promot Int ; 38(3)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319953

ABSTRACT

Physical activity (PA) is recognized as essential for positive physical and mental well-being in young people. However, participation in PA is known to decline as adolescents emerge into adulthood under the influence of complex social and structural factors. Globally, COVID-19 restrictions resulted in changes to PA and PA participation levels in youth populations, providing a unique opportunity for gaining insight into PA barriers and enablers in circumstances of challenge, limitation and change. This article details young people's self-reported PA behaviours during the 4-week 2020 COVID-19 lockdown in New Zealand. Taking a strengths-based view and drawing on the COM-B (capabilities, opportunity and motivation behaviour) model for behaviour change, the study explores factors enabling young people to sustain or increase PA during lockdown. Findings are drawn from qualitative-dominant mixed-methods analyses of responses to an online questionnaire: New Zealand Youth Voices Matter (16-24 years; N = 2014). Key insights included the importance of habit and routine, time and flexibility, social connections, incidental exercise and awareness of links between PA and well-being. Of note were the positive attitudes, creativity and resiliency demonstrated as young people substituted or invented alternatives to their usual PA. PA needs to change to adapt to new circumstances over the life course, and youth understanding and knowledge of modifiable factors may provide support for this. Thus these findings have implications for sustaining PA during late adolescence and emerging adulthood, a life phase that can be associated with significant challenge and change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Health Behavior , Mental Health
7.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 254, 2023 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 24, 2020, the Mexican Government established social distancing measures to address the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The resulting home confinement affected daily lifestyle habits such as eating, sleeping, and physical activity (PA). The objectives of this study were to determine changes in PA behaviors among Mexican women due to the COVID-19 pandemic and to assess potential factors associated with these changes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study based on an anonymous online questionnaire developed by the Task Force on Physical Activity for Persons with Disabilities (PAPD) within the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM). Descriptive, quantitative statistics were used for data analysis. A Chi-squared (χ²) test was used to explore associations between dependent and independent variables. RESULTS: A total of 1882 surveys were completed. Among the respondents, 53.3% declared that their PA was reduced during the pandemic, 26.6% reported similar PA behavior, and 20.1% declared that their PA had increased during the pandemic. Lower PA behavior during the pandemic was associated with lower education levels, stricter pandemic constraints, obesity, and lower self-perceived functioning levels. A statistically significant association between poorer self-perceived mental health and decreased PA behaviors was also found. Respondents who were younger, self-perceived as unimpaired, not overweight, and whose income was not impacted by COVID-19 were associated with higher levels of reported physical and mental health. CONCLUSIONS: The study results identify disparities experienced in PA behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic among Mexican women and highlights the need for social support for PA participation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Health Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Female , Pandemics , Mexico , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
8.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e069982, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319417

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a growing concern in South Africa, where many find self-management challenging. Behaviour-change health interventions are enhanced by involving partners of patients. We aimed to develop a couples-focused intervention to improve self-management of T2D among adults in South Africa. DESIGN: We used the person-based approach (PBA): synthesising evidence from existing interventions; background research; theory; and primary qualitative interviews with 10 couples to ascertain barriers and facilitators to self-management. This evidence was used to formulate guiding principles that directed the intervention design. We then prototyped the intervention workshop material, shared it with our public and patient involvement group and ran iterative co-discovery think-aloud sessions with nine couples. Feedback was rapidly analysed and changes formulated to improve the intervention, optimising its acceptability and maximising its potential efficacy. SETTING: We recruited couples using public-sector health services in the area of Cape Town, South Africa, during 2020-2021. PARTICIPANTS: The 38 participants were couples where one person had T2D. INTERVENTION: We developed the 'Diabetes Together' intervention to support self-management of T2D among couples in South Africa, focussing on: improved communication and shared appraisal of T2D; identifying opportunities for better self-management; and support from partners. Diabetes Together combined eight informational and two skills-building sections over two workshops. RESULTS: Our guiding principles included: providing equal information on T2D to partners; improving couples' communication; shared goal-setting; discussion of diabetes fears; discussing couples' roles in diabetes self-management; and supporting couples' autonomy to identify and prioritise diabetes self-management strategies.Participants viewing Diabetes Together valued the couples-focus of the intervention, especially communication. Feedback resulted in several improvements throughout the intervention, for example, addressing health concerns and tailoring to the setting. CONCLUSIONS: Using the PBA, our intervention was developed and tailored to our target audience. Our next step is to pilot the workshops' feasibility and acceptability.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , Adult , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , South Africa , Health Behavior , Patient Participation
9.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1139110, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316444

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We investigated recent trends in health behaviors and mental health conditions among Korean adolescents from 2017 to 2021 and compared the changes before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: Data analysis was conducted on 289,415 adolescents participating in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey, an annual cross-sectional study from 2017 to 2021. All analysis was conducted using sex stratification, and the annual percentage change (APC) was calculated. Results: Alcohol consumption and smoking decreased in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before, except for girls from the low-income level. The prevalence of inadequate physical activity for both boys and girls increased in 2020 compared with the pre-COVID-19 period and decreased again by 2021. The prevalence of obesity in both sexes increased regardless of the period (boys, APC = 8.2%, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 6.4-10.1; girls, APC = 3.3%, 95% CI, 1.8-4.8). The prevalence of stress, depression, and suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts for both sexes decreased in 2020 compared to the pre-COVID-19 period. By 2021, this prevalence had returned to a level similar to before the pandemic. No significant APC changes were observed in the prevalence of mental health. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the trends and APCs in health behaviors and mental health conditions among Korean adolescents over the last 5 years. We must pay attention to the heterogeneous and multifaceted features of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Female , Male , Humans , Adolescent , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e41900, 2023 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Positive health behavior changes before pregnancy can optimize perinatal outcomes for mothers, babies, and future generations. Women are often motivated to positively change their behavior in preparation for pregnancy to enhance their health and well-being. Mobile phone apps may provide an opportunity to deliver public health interventions during the preconception period. OBJECTIVE: This review aimed to synthesize the evidence of the effectiveness of mobile phone apps in promoting positive behavior changes in women of reproductive age before they are pregnant (preconception and interconception periods), which may improve future outcomes for mothers and babies. METHODS: Five databases were searched in February 2022 for studies exploring mobile phone apps as a prepregnancy intervention to promote positive behavior change. The identified studies were retrieved and exported to EndNote (Thomson Reuters). Using Covidence (Veritas Health Innovation), a PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) study flow diagram was generated to map the number of records identified, included, and excluded. Three independent reviewers assessed the risk of bias and conducted data extraction using the Review Manager software (version 5.4, The Cochrane Collaboration), and the data were then pooled using a random-effects model. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system was used to assess the certainty of the evidence. RESULTS: Of the 2973 publications identified, 7 (0.24%) were included. The total number of participants across the 7 trials was 3161. Of the 7 studies, 4 (57%) included participants in the interconception period, and 3 (43%) included women in the preconception period. Of the 7 studies, 5 (71%) studies focused on weight reduction, assessing the outcomes of reductions in adiposity and weight. Of the 7 studies, nutrition and dietary outcomes were evaluated in 2 (29%) studies, blood pressure outcomes were compared in 4 (57%) studies, and biochemical and marker outcomes associated with managing disease symptoms were included in 4 (57%) studies. Analysis showed that there were no statistically significant differences in energy intake; weight loss; body fat; and biomarkers such as glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, fasting lipid profiles, or blood pressure when compared with standard care. CONCLUSIONS: Owing to the limited number of studies and low certainty of the evidence, no firm conclusions can be drawn on the effects of mobile phone app interventions on promoting positive behavior changes in women of reproductive age before they are pregnant (preconception and interconception periods). TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42017065903; https://tinyurl.com/2p9dwk4a. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s13643-019-0996-6.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Mobile Applications , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Diet , Health Behavior , Obesity
11.
MMWR Suppl ; 72(1): 1-12, 2023 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300464

ABSTRACT

The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) is the largest public health surveillance system in the United States, monitoring a broad range of health-related behaviors among high school students. The system includes a nationally representative Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and separate school-based YRBSs conducted by states, tribes, territories, and local school districts. In 2021, these surveys were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic underscored the importance of data in understanding changes in youth risk behaviors and addressing the multifaceted public health needs of youths. This overview report describes 2021 YRBSS survey methodology, including sampling, data collection procedures, response rates, data processing, weighting, and analyses. The 2021 YRBS participation map, survey response rates, and a detailed examination of student demographic characteristics are included in this report. During 2021, in addition to the national YRBS, a total of 78 surveys were administered to high school students across the United States, representing the national population, 45 states, two tribal governments, three territories, and 28 local school districts. YRBSS data from 2021 provided the first opportunity since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic to compare youth health behaviors using long-term public health surveillance. Approximately half of all student respondents represented racial and ethnic minority groups, and approximately one in four identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, or other (a sexual identity other than heterosexual) (LGBQ+). These findings reflect shifts in youth demographics, with increased percentages of racial and ethnic minority and LGBQ+ youths compared with previous YRBSS cycles. Educators, parents, local decision makers, and other partners use YRBSS data to monitor health behavior trends, guide school health programs, and develop local and state policy. These and future data can be used in developing health equity strategies to address long-term disparities so that all youths can thrive in safe and supportive environments. This overview and methods report is one of 11 featured in this MMWR supplement. Each report is based on data collected using methods presented in this overview. A full description of YRBSS results and downloadable data are available (https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/index.htm).


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Adolescent , United States/epidemiology , Ethnicity , Pandemics , Minority Groups , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Risk-Taking , Sexual Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires , Population Surveillance
12.
MMWR Suppl ; 72(1): 75-83, 2023 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300049

ABSTRACT

The fall of 2021 was the first school semester to begin with widespread in-person learning since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Understanding dietary and physical activity behaviors of adolescents during this time can provide insight into potential health equity gaps and programmatic needs in schools and communities. This report uses data from the 2021 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey conducted among a nationally representative sample of U.S. public and private school students in grades 9-12 to update estimates of dietary and physical activity behaviors among U.S. high school students overall and by sex and race and ethnicity. In addition, 2-year comparisons (2019 versus 2021) of these behaviors were examined. In 2021, daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, and breakfast during the past 7 days remained low and decreased overall with specific disparities by sex and race and ethnicity from 2019 to 2021. The overall prevalence of students attending physical education classes daily, exercising to strengthen muscles on ≥3 days/week (i.e., met the guideline for muscle-strengthening activity), and playing on at least one sports team decreased from 2019 to 2021; whereas being physically active for ≥60 minutes/day on all 7 days (i.e., met the guideline for aerobic activity) and meeting both aerobic and muscle-strengthening guidelines remained low but did not change. These findings underscore the need for strategies to increase healthy dietary and physical activity behaviors both in the recovery phase of COVID-19 and longer term.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Behavior , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , United States/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Risk-Taking , Exercise , Students , Health Behavior
13.
J Phys Act Health ; 20(6): 538-546, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although disparities in socioeconomic status in health behaviors have been highlighted globally, they are not well understood in Japanese adolescents. The purpose of this study was to clarify the changes in socioeconomic disparities in adolescents' fundamental health behaviors, such as physical activity, screen time (ST), sleep, breakfast intake, and bowel movement before and during COVID-19. METHODS: This was a repeated cross-sectional study which used data from the 2019 and 2021 National Sports-Life Survey of Children and Young in Japan. Data of 766 and 725 participants in 2019 and 2021, respectively, were analyzed. Favorable health behaviors were defined as daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of at least 60 minutes, ST of less than 2 hours, sleep of 8 to 10 hours, daily breakfast intake, and bowel movement frequency of at least once in every 3 days. We calculated the slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality in each health behavior for equivalent household income levels for assessing absolute and relative economic inequalities. RESULTS: Compliance with MVPA and ST recommendation significantly declined from 20.1% and 23.0% in 2019 to 11.7% and 14.9% in 2021, respectively. The slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality increased in MVPA for income levels, but decreased in daily breakfast in 2019 to 2021. Although the widening and narrowing of the disparity were inconclusive for ST, it exacerbated for the higher-income groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed widening of economic disparities in the achievement of recommended MVPA and narrowing of it in breakfast intake among adolescents before and during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Socioeconomic Factors , East Asian People , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior
14.
Cancer ; 129(8): 1156-1158, 2023 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295799

ABSTRACT

PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: In this issue of Cancer, Clarke et al. measure defensive information processing (DIP) to avoid fecal immunochemical testing for colorectal cancer. DIP is a way of reducing the negative psychological effects of threats such as cancer and may influence health-protective behaviors such as the completion of recommended cancer screening. This editorial complements Clarke et al.'s study with a discussion of interventions for decreasing DIP around cancer screening and other health-protective recommendations.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Mass Screening , Humans , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Occult Blood , Early Detection of Cancer
15.
J Atten Disord ; 27(9): 979-988, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295686

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: ADHD is associated with suboptimal health behaviors including physical activity (PA). LEAP is a parent BMT group program enhanced to focus on health behaviors, integrated with mHealth technology. Little is known about implementing BMT via telemedicine "telegroups." METHODS: Children ages 5 to 10 with ADHD and their caregiver wore activity trackers and participated in an 8 to 9 week parent BMT and social media group emphasizing PA, sleep, and screen use. A 7-day child accelerometer-wear and parent and teacher measures were completed pre- and post-group. Groups were in-person prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and in telegroup format during the pandemic. RESULTS: Thirty-three families participated in person and 23 participated via virtual telegroup. Group attendance was superior for telegroup with equivalent satisfaction and skill use. Changes in health behavior and clinical outcomes were equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: LEAP is a feasible and novel BMT intervention that can be delivered in an accessible telegroup format with high participation and acceptability.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Child , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/therapy , Pandemics , Parents/education , Health Behavior
16.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0282368, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293292

ABSTRACT

The online health community has the functions of online consultation, health record management and disease information interaction as an online medical platform. In the context of the pandemic, the existence of online health communities has provided a favorable environment for information acquisition and knowledge sharing among different roles, effectively improving the health of human, and popularizing health knowledge. This paper analyzes the development and importance of domestic online health communities, and sorts out users' participation behaviors, types of behaviors, and continuous participation behaviors, influence motives, and motivational patterns in online health communities. Taking the operation status of the online health community during the pandemic period as an example, the computer sentiment analysis method was used to obtain seven categories of participation behaviors and the proportion of various behaviors of online health community users, and the conclusion is: the emergence of the pandemic, making the online health community a platform where people are more inclined to choose to consult health issues, and user interaction behaviors have become more active on the platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Motivation , Pandemics , Sentiment Analysis
17.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20220283, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291682

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hygiene behaviors of individuals during the Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHOD: During the pandemic (April 2021-September 2021), 439 adults were surveyed online via Google Forms, which assessed the individuals' introductory information and hygiene behaviors as determined by the COVID-19 Hygiene Scale. RESULTS: Out of the participants, 71.3% were female and 68.3% were 18-33 years old. The mean COVID-19 Hygiene Scale score of the participants was 94.62 ± 26.56. Individuals belonging to the 18-33 years age group had significantly higher hand hygiene scores than the other age groups (p < 0.05). Women showed a higher mean total and subdomain scores in the COVID-19 Hygiene Scale than men. A significant difference between the social distance and mask use and hand hygiene subdomains was observed (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The hand hygiene scores of the individuals varied by age and gender, whereas the social distance and mask use scores varied by only gender. Based on the above mentioned results, the nurses should focus on the individuals' development of effective hygiene behaviors, and schedule and implement trainings according to the sociodemographic differences among the individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Hygiene , Male , Adult , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Behavior
18.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1084259, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304601

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aimed to assess the extent of alcohol use and misuse among clinical therapists working in psychiatric hospitals in China during the early COVID-19 Pandemic, and to identify associated factors. Methods: An anonymous nationwide survey was conducted in 41 tertiary psychiatric hospitals. We collected demographic data as well as alcohol use using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) and burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 396 clinical therapists completed the survey, representing 89.0% of all potential participants we targeted. The mean age of participants was 33.8 years old, and more than three-quarters (77.5%) were female. Nearly two-fifths (39.1%) self-reported as current alcohol users. The overall prevalence of alcohol misuse was 6.6%. Nearly one-fifth (19.9%) reported symptoms of burnout with high emotional exhaustion in 46 (11.6%), and high depersonalization in 61 (15.4%). Multiple logistic regression showed alcohol use was associated with male gender (OR = 4.392; 95% CI =2.443-7.894), single marital status (OR = 1.652; 95% CI =0.970-2.814), smoking habit (OR = 3.847; 95%CI =1.160-12.758) and regular exercise (OR = 2.719; 95%CI =1.490-4.963). Alcohol misuse was associated with male gender (OR = 3.367; 95% CI =1.174-9.655), a lower education level (OR = 3.788; 95%CI =1.009-14.224), smoking habit (OR = 4.626; 95%CI =1.277-16.754) and high burnout (depersonalization, OR = 4.848; 95%CI =1.433-16.406). Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, clinical therapists' alcohol consumption did not increase significantly. Male gender, cigarette smoking, and burnout are associated with an increased risk of alcohol misuse among clinical therapists. Targeted intervention is needed when developing strategies to reduce alcohol misuse and improve clinical therapists' wellness and mental health.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , Health Behavior
19.
Soc Sci Med ; 325: 115917, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303788

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Neighbourhood socio-economic deprivation is strongly related to health-risk behaviours, which are predictors of overall health and mortality. During the Covid-19 pandemic, individuals have been forced to spend more time within their residential areas, which might have had an effect on health-risk behaviours. OBJECTIVE: We assess the consequences of living in a more or less deprived neighbourhood during the pandemic on individual behavioural changes in four health-related outcomes: smoking, drinking, physical activity and healthy eating. We hypothesise that the pandemic and related lock-downs had negative effects on health-related behaviours, but that this negative effect had been stronger for people living in more deprived areas. We additionally explore sex and ethnicity as sources of heterogeneity in these effects. METHODS: We use data from four nationally representative cohort studies in England. We perform longitudinal individual and neighbourhood fixed effects estimations focusing on comparing the pre-pandemic period with the first lockdown (May 2020) period and up to one year after the outbreak of the pandemic (March 2021). RESULTS: During the first lockdown, as compared to pre-pandemic levels, on average, people smoked more, drunk more and did more physical activity. However, compared to people in less deprived neighbourhoods, people living in more deprived areas showed a smaller increase in their levels of physical activity, consumed less fruit and vegetables and increased the number of cigarettes smoked. We additionally find that the combined effect of Covid-19 and area deprivation varies significantly by both sex and ethnicity. CONCLUSION: Results add to evidence on the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and associated lockdowns on health-risk behaviours, highlighting the relative contribution of the neighbourhood environment and individual characteristics. We argue that reducing levels of neighbourhood deprivation may contribute to positively influence behaviours, especially for some sub-groups of the population, leading to a reduction of social inequalities in health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Socioeconomic Factors , Residence Characteristics , Health Behavior
20.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284354, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301843

ABSTRACT

Effectively addressing public health crises like the COVID-19 pandemic requires persuading the mass public to change their behavior in significant ways. Many efforts to encourage behavior change-such as public service announcements, social media posts, and billboards-involve short, persuasive appeals, yet the effectiveness of these messages is unclear. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, we tested whether short messages could increase intentions to comply with public health guidelines. To identify promising messages, we conducted two pretests (n = 1,596) in which participants rated the persuasiveness of 56 unique messages: 31 based on the persuasion and social influence literatures and 25 drawn from a pool of crowdsourced messages generated by online respondents. The four top-rated messages emphasized: (1) civic responsibility to reciprocate the sacrifices of health care workers, (2) caring for the elderly and vulnerable, (3) a specific, sympathetic victim, and (4) limited health care system capacity. We then conducted three well-powered, pre-registered experiments (total n = 3,719) testing whether these four top-rated messages, and a standard public health message based on language from the CDC, increased intentions to comply with public health guidelines, such as masking in public spaces. In Study 1, we found the four messages and the standard public health message significantly outperformed a null control. In Studies 2 and 3, we compared the effects of persuasive messages to the standard public health message, finding that none consistently out-performed the standard message. This is in line with other research showing minimal persuasive effects of short messages after the very early stages of the pandemic. Across our studies, we found that (1) short messages can increase intentions to comply with public health guidelines, but (2) short messages featuring persuasive techniques from the social science literature did not substantially outperform standard public health messages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Public Health , Health Behavior , Persuasive Communication
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