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1.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 46, abr. 2022
Article in English | PAHO, PAHOIRIS | ID: covidwho-1791370

ABSTRACT

[ABSTRACT]. Objective. To describe the editorial processing time of published COVID-19 research articles and compare this with a similar topic, human influenza, and analyze the number of publications, withdrawals, and retractions. Methods. A descriptive-analytical study using PubMed on research articles with the MeSH terms human influenza and COVID-19. Time to acceptance (from submission to acceptance) and time to publication (from acceptance to publication) were compared. Retractions and withdrawals were reviewed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results. There were 31 319 research articles on COVID-19 and 4 287 on human influenza published during 2020. The median time to acceptance for COVID-19 was lower than that for human influenza (8 vs. 92 days). The median time to publication for COVID-19 articles was shorter than those on human influenza (12 vs. 16 days); 47.0% of COVID-19 research articles were accepted within the first week of submission, and 19.5% within one day. There were 82 retractions and withdrawals for COVID-19 articles, 1 for human influenza, and 5 for articles that contain both terms; these were mainly related to ethical misconduct, and 27 (31.0%) were published by the same group of authors in one highest-quartile journal. Conclusions. The conundrum between fast publishing and adequate standards is shown in this analysis of COVID-19 research articles. The speed of acceptance for COVID-19 manuscripts was 11.5 times faster than for human influenza. The high number of acceptances within a day or week of submission and the number of retractions and withdrawals of COVID-19 papers might be a warning sign about the possible lack of a quality control process in scientific publishing and the peer review process.


[RESUMEN]. Objetivo. Describir el tiempo de procesamiento editorial de los artículos de investigación sobre la COVID-19 publicados, compararlo con un tema similar, la gripe humana, y analizar el número de publicaciones realizadas, el de artículos retirados y el de retractaciones. Métodos. Usando PubMed, se llevó a cabo un estudio descriptivo y analítico sobre artículos de investigación con los términos en inglés correspondientes a “gripe humana” y “COVID-19” en el MeSH. Se compararon el tiempo de aceptación (desde la presentación hasta la aceptación) y el tiempo de publicación (desde la aceptación hasta la publicación). Se examinaron las publicaciones retiradas y las retractaciones de manera cualitativa y cuantitativa. Resultados. Hubo 31 319 artículos de investigación sobre la COVID-19 y 4 287 sobre la gripe humana publicados en el año 2020. La mediana del tiempo de aceptación de los artículos sobre la COVID-19 fue inferior que la mediana de la gripe humana (8 días en contraste con 92 días). La mediana del tiempo de publicación de los artículos sobre la COVID-19 fue menor que la de los artículos sobre la gripe humana (12 días en contraste con 16 días). El 47,0 % de los artículos de investigación sobre la COVID-19 se aceptaron en la primera semana de presentación, y el 19,5 %, en un día. Hubo 82 retractaciones y retiradas de artículos sobre la COVID-19, una sobre la gripe humana y 5 de artículos que contenían ambos términos; estas retractaciones y retiradas estuvieron relacionadas principalmente con faltas de conducta ética. Además, hubo 27 artículos (31,0 %) publicados por el mismo grupo de autores en una revista de cuartil más alto. Conclusiones. El dilema entre la publicación rápida y unas normas adecuadas se muestra en este análisis de artículos de investigación sobre la COVID-19. La velocidad de aceptación de los manuscritos sobre la COVID-19 fue 11,5 veces mayor que la velocidad de aceptación de los artículos sobre la gripe humana. El alto número de aceptaciones en un día o una semana desde la presentación y el número de retractaciones y retiradas de artículos sobre la COVID-19 podría ser un signo de advertencia acerca de la posible falta de un proceso de control de calidad en las publicaciones científicas y especialmente en el proceso de arbitraje.


[RESUMO]. Objetivo. Descrever o tempo de processamento editorial dos artigos de pesquisa publicados sobre COVID-19, compará-lo com o de artigos sobre um tema semelhante (gripe humana) e analisar o número de publicações, suspensões e retratações. Métodos. Estudo descritivo-analítico. Foi realizada uma busca no PubMed usando os descritores MeSH “human influenza” e “COVID-19”. O tempo até a aceitação (da submissão à aceitação) e o tempo até a publicação (da aceitação à publicação) foram comparados. Retratações e suspensões foram analisadas qualitativa e quantitativamente. Resultados. Foram publicados 31 319 artigos de pesquisa sobre a COVID-19 e 4 287 sobre a gripe humana em 2020. O tempo médio de aceitação de artigos sobre COVID-19 foi menor que o de artigos sobre gripe humana (8 versus 92 dias). O tempo médio até publicação dos artigos sobre COVID-19 foi menor que o de artigos sobre gripe humana (12 versus 16 dias); 47,0% dos artigos sobre COVID-19 foram aceitos na primeira semana após a submissão, e 19,5%, dentro de um dia. Houve 82 retratações e suspensões de artigos sobre COVID-19, 1 sobre gripe humana, e 5 de artigos que continham ambos os termos, principalmente relacionadas a má conduta ética; 27 (31,0%) desses artigos foram publicados pelo mesmo grupo de autores, em uma revista do mais alto quartil. Conclusões. O dilema entre publicar rapidamente e manter padrões adequados fica claro nesta análise de artigos sobre COVID-19. Manuscritos sobre COVID-19 foram aceitos 11,5 vezes mais rapidamente do que artigos sobre gripe humana. O alto número de aceitações em um dia ou semana após a submissão e o número de retratações e suspensões de artigos sobre COVID-19 alertam sobre uma possível falta de controle de qualidade na publicação científica e no processo de revisão por pares.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Retraction of Publication as Topic , Scientific Publication Ethics , Health Communication , Scientific Misconduct , Pandemics , Influenza, Human , Retraction of Publication as Topic , Scientific Publication Ethics , Health Communication , Scientific Misconduct , Influenza, Human , Retraction of Publication as Topic , Scientific Publication Ethics , Health Communication , Scientific Misconduct
2.
Vaccine ; 40(15): 2282-2291, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783813

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence suggesting that vaccines offer protection against COVID-19, the uptake rates of COVID-19 vaccines have been low in some high-income regions. Support for vaccination program is important to fight the pandemic. This study aimed at exploring two research questions: first, to what extent political attitudes are associated with support for COVID-19 vaccination program; and second, whether health expert communication is effective in increasing the support. An online survey was undertaken by 1079 Hong Kong residents aged 18-77 years from May 26 to June 3, 2021. The survey found higher support in pro-government respondents, and lower support in political opposition. A strategy of positive communication by health experts could increase support in the opposition and politically attentive respondents. Other variables that were positively related to program support were quarantine experience, trust in government, preference for pandemic control over freedom, political attentiveness, and disagreement with China's influence on Hong Kong's COVID-19 policymaking. This study contributes to understanding the relationship between political attitudes and support for vaccination program and provides empirical evidence of the efficacy of health expert communication strategy in improving support for vaccination program for people with certain political attitudes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Attitude , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination , Young Adult
4.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 28, 2022 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779652

ABSTRACT

Much health communication during the COVID-19 pandemic has been designed to persuade people more than to inform them. For example, messages like "masks save lives" are intended to compel people to wear face masks, not to enable them to make an informed decision about whether to wear a face mask or to understand the justification for a mask mandate. Both persuading people and informing them are reasonable goals for health communication. However, those goals can sometimes be in conflict. In this article, we discuss potential conflicts between seeking to persuade or to inform people, the use of spin to persuade people, the ethics of persuasion, and implications for health communication in the context of the pandemic and generally. Decisions to persuade people rather than enable them to make an informed choice may be justified, but the basis for those decisions should be transparent and the evidence should not be distorted. We suggest nine principles to guide decisions by health authorities about whether to try to persuade people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Communication , Emergencies , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Soc Sci Med ; 296: 114767, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730110

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy presents significant challenges for public health. OBJECTIVE: Vaccine hesitancy among middle-aged and older adults has been a significant barrier in Singapore's battle against COVID-19. We hypothesize that the trust middle-aged and older adults place in various sources of information influences vaccine hesitancy, and that distinct typologies of trust can be identified to better inform targeted health communication efforts. METHOD: Data from a nationally representative panel survey of Singaporeans aged 56-75 (N = 6094) was utilized. Modules fielded in August and November 2020, and June 2021 were analyzed, assessing social networks, trust in sources of information, and vaccination status respectively. Predictors of vaccination status were first examined. Latent class analysis was then used to identify typologies of trust in various sources of information. RESULTS: Trust in formal sources of information (e.g government sources) is found to predict vaccination status among respondents. Contrary to expectations, trust in social media and informal sources (family and friends), and perceived social support did not predict vaccination status. Latent class analysis identified 4 typologies of respondents based on their patterns of trust in these sources. Significantly, it is found that a portion of respondents with low trust in formal sources of information have high trust in informal sources. The four distinct typologies of trust in sources of information are also found to predict vaccination status. CONCLUSIONS: Because trust in formal sources of information influences vaccination status, authorities should build trust in such sources to encourage vaccination against COVID-19. However, health communication strategies with middle-aged and older adults who have low levels of trust in the formal sources may be more effective if authorities leveraged alternative channels such as informal sources, including the social networks of such individuals. Overall, the findings suggest the need for targeted communication strategies to encourage vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Trust , Vaccination
6.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(SI-1): 3168-3181, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726145

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: The purpose of this review was to present the ultimate toll of the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on the communication strategies and mental health. Materials and methods: We unsystematically reviewed the studies published between 2020 and 2021 from databases such as Google Scholar, Web of Science and ScienceDirect. Firstly, "new-normal" life challenges during the pandemic were discussed along with the public risk communication strategies. Later, mental health problems, posttraumatic growth, and protective factors were reviewed. Results: Literature highlighted that individuals mainly experience COVID-19 related fear, anxiety, stress, negative emotions and sleep problems. Furthermore, the rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder suggest an increase. Specifically, COVID-19 stress syndrome, loneliness, and sleep problems were associated with mental health problems in the pandemic. However, some individuals seem to be resilient to the COVID-19 trauma and experience posttraumatic growth. Brief online intervention studies are promising for reducing the emotional toll of the COVID-19 as well as for making individuals more resilient. Conclusion: To conclude, the negative conditions of the pandemic seem to make some people, but not all, vulnerable to mental illness. In addition, framing the public warnings in an optimal emotional tone seems to be more effective to comply with the precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Communication , Mental Health , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders
7.
Am J Health Promot ; 35(1): 106-115, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724153

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Guided by the hypothesis that the arts can play a role in changing attitudes, beliefs, and health behaviors, the objectives of the study were to (1) overview artistic practices, interventions, and research being conducted at the intersection of the arts and health communication and (2) identify desired and observed outcomes and variables measured in these studies. DATA SOURCE: The search strategy was developed iteratively with 2 health science librarians and conducted using 8 databases (Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Art and Architecture Source, CINAHL, Communication and Mass Media Complete, ERIC, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science) and hand searching. Articles included were published between 2014 and 2018. STUDY INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria include US nonclinical setting and use of the arts (broadly defined) to change health knowledge, beliefs, behaviors, or awareness. Any articles not meeting inclusion criteria were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION: Covidence's data extraction tool exported to MS Excel. DATA SYNTHESIS: This final set of results was analyzed and synthesized by research design, population, sample size, health issue, purpose, variables measured, and findings. RESULTS: In all, 78 articles met inclusion criteria. Number of participants ranged from 4 to 2140 (mean = 179); 61 (78.2%) outcome studies, including 8 experimental studies; 17 (21.79%) formative research or reports. Many different health topics were addressed and different art forms used. CONCLUSION: The arts can help build knowledge and awareness of health issues. The authors highlight the need to build an evidence base for arts and public health.


Subject(s)
Art , Health Communication , Attitude , Humans , United States
11.
Ann Glob Health ; 88(1): 10, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687323

ABSTRACT

Background: With the COVID-19 pandemic restricting travel, global health programs are faced with the challenge of bidirectionally supporting students, partners, and communities in new ways. Though other global health programs have-to the best of our knowledge-temporarily frozen, we at the Nuvance Health/University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program have carried forward by transforming our communications through launching a COVID-19 Resources Page with bi-weekly article summaries, redirecting our monthly eMagazine and weekly blog to pandemic themes, and staying in constant communication with our partners around the world. Objective: To investigate the extent to which our program's published content shifted in sync with the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as our international partners' perception of the COVID-19 resource center, eMagazine, and blog in terms of relevance, representation, and utility. Methods: A survey consisting of quantitative questions and open-ended response questions was allocated along the following themes: (1) eMagazine; (2) Global Health Diaries blog; (3) COVID-19 Resource Center including article summaries; and (4) communications. It was sent to 34 leaders in our partner sites across nine countries-Botswana, China, the Dominican Republic, India, Thailand, Russia, Uganda, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe-and filled out by 31. Findings: Survey results revealed overwhelmingly positive feedback from our global health partners who reported frequently using our COVID-19 resources, often as first-line information about the pandemic; feeling emotional support through our communications; enjoying content in our eMagazine and blog; and finding fair representation in our published content. Our global health program is more deeply connected than ever. Conclusions: Though global health programs seemingly have their hands tied, we are only beginning to imagine the breadth of new avenues for connectivity, learning, and sharing. We must all be creative about staying connected. There are avenues for global health advocacy yet to be discovered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667169

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause a collapse in the health systems and econo-mies of many countries around the world, after 2 years of struggle and with the number of cases still growing exponentially. Health communication has become as essential and necessary for control of the pandemic as epidemiology. This bibliometric analysis identifies existing contributions, jointly studying health communication and the pandemic in scientific journals indexed. A systematic search of the Web of Science was performed, using keywords related to COVID-19 and health communication. Data extracted included the type of study, journal, number of citations, number of authors, country of publication, and study content. As the number of scientific investigations has grown, it is necessary to delve into the areas in which the most impactful publications have been generated. The results show that the scientific community has been quick to react by generating an extraordinary volume of publications. This review provides a comprehensive mapping of contributions to date, showing how research approaches have evolved in parallel with the pandemic. In 2020, concepts related to mental health, mass communication, misinformation and communication risk were more used. In 2021, vaccination, infodemic, risk perception, social distancing and telemedicine were the most prevalent keywords. By highlighting the main topics, authors, manuscripts and journals since the origin of COVID-19, the authors hope to disseminate information that can help researchers to identify subsisting knowledge gaps and a number of future research opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Bibliometrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Orv Hetil ; 163(4): 132-139, 2022 01 23.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649695

ABSTRACT

Összefoglaló. Az elmúlt években mind laikus, mind szakmai oldalról az internet vált az elso számú egészségügyi információforrássá, amit a COVID-19-pandémia tovább fokozott. Az online térben számos, különbözo jellegu platform áll rendelkezésre egészségkommunikációs célokra, melyek markánsan különböznek egymástól az átadható információ mennyiségében és minoségében, a létrehozásukhoz szükséges anyagi vagy idobeli ráfordításban, továbbá az ott létrehozott tartalom fogyasztási lehetoségeiben. Összefoglaló közleményünkben rendszerezve mutatjuk be a szöveg-, a hang-, illetve a videóalapú online egészségügyi edukációs formák elonyeit és hátrányait. Külön foglalkozunk a közösségi média (social media) egészségügyi vonatkozásaival, a benne rejlo lehetoségekkel, kiemelve a pandémia kapcsán felmerült problémákat. Az egyes platformok egészségüggyel kapcsolatos történelmének feldolgozása mellett gyakorlati oldalról mutatjuk be azok hasznosíthatóságát, elosegítve ezzel az online térbe terelt kollégák munkáját. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(4): 132-139. Summary. In recent years, the internet has become the leading source of health-related information for both professionals and laymen, and this process has been further speeded up by the Covid-19 pandemic. There are many different platforms available for health communication purposes online, that vary greatly in the quantity and quality of transferable information; the time or financial input, which are necessary to create them; and the possibilities of the utilization of the created content. In our review, we present systematically the advantages and disadvantages of the text-, audio-, and video-based online health-related education platforms. We specify the health-related aspects of social media and its potential usability, focusing on the problems allied to the pandemic. We present the practical use of the different platforms from a healthcare perspective through the review of their respective histories, thus providing guidance to the colleagues working online. Orv Hetil. 2022; 163(4): 132-139.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Social Media , Humans , Hungary , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 2306, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636676

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The United States leads the world in confirmed COVID-19 cases; Arkansas ranks fifth in average daily cases per 100,000. Historically, Americans relied on health communications from governmental sources and the news media. However, there has been a documented decline of trust in these sources. The present study seeks to understand trusted sources of information about COVID-19 to improve health messaging because research shows the level of trust is associated with adherence to recommendations. METHODS: Data were collected using an online survey from participants (N = 1221) who were 18 years of age or older and residing, employed, or accessing health care in Arkansas. A qualitative descriptive design was used to summarize participants' experiences and perceptions related to trusted sources of COVID-19 information. RESULTS: Two primary themes related to participants' perceptions of sources of information about COVID-19 are reported: 1) trusted sources of information and 2) distrust or lack of trust in sources of information. Several subthemes emerged within each primary theme. Results showed high trust in the academic medical center, federal and state public health agencies, and local health care providers. The study also documents diverging voices of distrust and uncertainty in making sense of contradictory information. Participants reported the main reason for their lack of trust was the rapidly changing information and the lack of consistency in information provided across sources. CONCLUSIONS: This finding provides insight into the importance of coordination between national, state, and local communications to bolster trust. Personal recommendations and testimonies from trusted health care providers and professionals could inform public health messaging interventions to increase vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Trust , United States
16.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 352-361, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess an intervention that was created by a community-academic partnership to address COVID-19 health inequities. We evaluated a community-engaged bidirectional pandemic crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC) framework with immigrant and refugee populations during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A 17-year community-engaged research partnership adopted a CERC framework in March 2020 to address COVID-19 prevention, testing, and socioeconomic impacts with immigrant and refugee groups in southeast Minnesota. The partnership used bidirectional communication between communication leaders and their social networks to refine messages, leverage resources, and advise policy makers. We conducted a mixed-methods evaluation for intervention acceptability, feasibility, reach, adaptation, and sustainability through multisource data, including email communications, work group notes, semistructured interviews, and focus groups. RESULTS: The intervention reached at least 39 000 people in 9 months. It was implemented as intended and perceived efficacy was high. Frequent communication between community and academic partners allowed the team to respond rapidly to concerns and facilitated connection of community members to resources. Framework implementation also led to systems and policy changes to meet the needs of immigrant and refugee populations. CONCLUSIONS: Community-engaged CERC is feasible and sustainable and can reduce COVID-19 disparities through shared creation and dissemination of public health messages, enhanced connection to existing resources, and incorporation of community perspectives in regional pandemic mitigation policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Community Participation/methods , Community-Based Participatory Research/organization & administration , Emigrants and Immigrants , Health Communication/methods , Program Evaluation , Refugees , Humans , Minnesota , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e057127, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine SARS-CoV-2 vaccine confidence, attitudes and intentions in Australian adults as part of the iCARE Study. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional online survey conducted when free COVID-19 vaccinations first became available in Australia in February 2021. PARTICIPANTS: Total of 1166 Australians from general population aged 18-90 years (mean 52, SD of 19). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome: responses to question 'If a vaccine for COVID-19 were available today, what is the likelihood that you would get vaccinated?'.Secondary outcome: analyses of putative drivers of uptake, including vaccine confidence, socioeconomic status and sources of trust, derived from multiple survey questions. RESULTS: Seventy-eight per cent reported being likely to receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Higher SARS-CoV-2 vaccine intentions were associated with: increasing age (OR: 2.01 (95% CI 1.77 to 2.77)), being male (1.37 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.72)), residing in least disadvantaged area quintile (2.27 (95% CI 1.53 to 3.37)) and a self-perceived high risk of getting COVID-19 (1.52 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.14)). However, 72% did not believe they were at a high risk of getting COVID-19. Findings regarding vaccines in general were similar except there were no sex differences. For both the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and vaccines in general, there were no differences in intentions to vaccinate as a function of education level, perceived income level and rurality. Knowing that the vaccine is safe and effective and that getting vaccinated will protect others, trusting the company that made it and vaccination recommended by a doctor were reported to influence a large proportion of the study cohort to uptake the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Seventy-eight per cent reported the intent to continue engaging in virus-protecting behaviours (mask wearing, social distancing, etc) postvaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Most Australians are likely to receive a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Key influencing factors identified (eg, knowing vaccine is safe and effective, and doctor's recommendation to get vaccinated) can inform public health messaging to enhance vaccination rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Vaccines , Adult , Attitude , Australia , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Male , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e30962, 2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The importance of effective communication during public health emergencies has been highlighted by the World Health Organization, and it has published guidelines for effective communication in such situations. With video being a popular medium, video communication has been a growing area of study over the past decades and is increasingly used across different sectors and disciplines, including health. Health-related video communication gained momentum during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, and video was among the most frequently used modes of communication worldwide. However, although much research has been done regarding different characteristics of video content (the message) and its delivery (the messenger), there is a lack of knowledge about the role played by the characteristics of the recipients for the creation of effective communication. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to identify how health video communication outcomes are shaped by recipient characteristics, as such characteristics might affect the effectiveness of communication. The main research question of the study is as follows: do the characteristics of the recipients of health videos affect the outcomes of the communication? METHODS: A scoping review describing the existing knowledge within the field was conducted. We searched for literature in 3 databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Embase) and defined eligibility criteria based on the relevance to the research question. Recipient characteristics and health video communication outcomes were identified and classified. RESULTS: Of the 1040 documents initially identified, 128 (12.31%) met the criteria for full-text assessment, and 39 (3.75%) met the inclusion criteria. The included studies reported 56 recipient characteristics and 42 communication outcomes. The reported associations between characteristics and outcomes were identified, and the potential research opportunities were discussed. Contributions were made to theory development by amending the existing framework of the Integrated-Change model, which is an integrated model of motivational and behavioral change. CONCLUSIONS: Although several recipient characteristics and health video communication outcomes were identified, there is a lack of robust empirical evidence on the association between them. Further research is needed to understand how the preceding characteristics of the recipients might affect the various outcomes of health video communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communications Media , Health Communication , Communication , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592647

ABSTRACT

Since the 1970s, health communication (HC) has attracted widespread attention from practitioners and researchers in various fields in China, leading to the production of a vast array of literature. In order to reveal the current state, popular themes, and research frontiers of HC research, this study employed the CiteSpace software to conduct a comprehensive review based on 1505 HC publications from 1992 to 2021 retrieved from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database. The results demonstrated that (1) the number of HC publications has experienced an annual increase over the past 20 years, albeit with certain inverted S-shaped fluctuations and (2) the most prolific authors mainly included Wang L.Y., Zhang Z.L., and Wang Y.L., while well-known universities played a leading role in HC research in China. A significant finding was that a stable core group of authors or institutional has been not formed in the HC field. Furthermore, (3) research hotspots included health education, new media, health literacy, health information, animal husbandry and veterinary medicine (AHVM), the doctor-patient relationship, and public health emergencies. Additionally, the development of the field could be divided into four stages, indicating a significant shift in HC research from focusing on medicine and public health issues towards communication issues. Finally, (4) new research frontiers have mainly included the WeChat official account and Health China.


Subject(s)
Health Communication , Animals , Bibliometrics , China , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Software
20.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e242, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591869

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the decision-making process of college students in Lebanon regarding coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccination. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting behavioural intentions of students enrolled at the American University of Beirut to obtain a COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 3805 students were randomly selected. Participants were divided into three groups: vaccine accepting (willing to take or already took the vaccine), vaccine hesitant (hesitant to take the vaccine) and vaccine resistant (decided not to take the vaccine). Overall, participants were vaccine accepting (87%), with 10% and 3% being hesitant and resistant, respectively. Vaccine hesitancy was significantly associated with nationality, residency status and university rank. Participants who believed the vaccine was safe and in agreement with their personal views were less likely to be hesitant. Participants who did not receive the flu vaccine were more hesitant than those who did. Moreover, a significant association between hesitancy and agreement with conspiracies was observed. A high level of knowledge about COVID-19 disease and vaccine resulted in lower odds of vaccine resistance among students. The factors identified explaining each of the three vaccine intention groups can be used as core content for health communication and social marketing campaigns to increase the rate of COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Students/psychology , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Health Communication , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Students/statistics & numerical data , Universities , Young Adult
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