Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 67
Filter
2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0260367, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793557

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The world is awash with claims about the effects of health interventions. Many of these claims are untrustworthy because the bases are unreliable. Acting on unreliable claims can lead to waste of resources and poor health outcomes. Yet, most people lack the necessary skills to appraise the reliability of health claims. The Informed Health Choices (IHC) project aims to equip young people in Ugandan lower secondary schools with skills to think critically about health claims and to make good health choices by developing and evaluating digital learning resources. To ensure that we create resources that are suitable for use in Uganda's secondary schools and can be scaled up if found effective, we conducted a context analysis. We aimed to better understand opportunities and barriers related to demand for the resources, how the learning content overlaps with existing curriculum and conditions in secondary schools for accessing and using digital resources, in order to inform resource development. METHODS: We used a mixed methods approach and collected both qualitative and quantitative data. We conducted document analyses, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, school visits, and a telephone survey regarding information communication and technology (ICT). We used a nominal group technique to obtain consensus on the appropriate number and length of IHC lessons that should be planned in a school term. We developed and used a framework from the objectives to code the transcripts and generated summaries of query reports in Atlas.ti version 7. FINDINGS: Critical thinking is a key competency in the lower secondary school curriculum. However, the curriculum does not explicitly make provision to teach critical thinking about health, despite a need acknowledged by curriculum developers, teachers and students. Exam oriented teaching and a lack of learning resources are additional important barriers to teaching critical thinking about health. School closures and the subsequent introduction of online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated teachers' use of digital equipment and learning resources for teaching. Although the government is committed to improving access to ICT in schools and teachers are open to using ICT, access to digital equipment, unreliable power and internet connections remain important hinderances to use of digital learning resources. CONCLUSIONS: There is a recognized need for learning resources to teach critical thinking about health in Ugandan lower secondary schools. Digital learning resources should be designed to be usable even in schools with limited access and equipment. Teacher training on use of ICT for teaching is needed.


Subject(s)
Health Behavior/physiology , Health Education/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Adolescent , Choice Behavior/physiology , Curriculum , Digital Technology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Information Dissemination/ethics , Information Dissemination/methods , Learning , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Schools/trends , Students , Thinking , Uganda/ethnology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264782, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759948

ABSTRACT

What types of public health messages are effective at changing people's beliefs and intentions to practice social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19? We conducted two randomized experiments in summer 2020 that assigned respondents to read a public health message and then measured their beliefs and behavioral intentions across a wide variety of outcomes. Using both a convenience sample and a pre-registered replication with a nationally representative sample of Americans, we find that a message that reframes not social distancing as recklessness rather than bravery and a message that highlights the need for everyone to take action to protect one another are the most effective at increasing beliefs and intentions related to social distancing. These results provide an evidentiary basis for building effective public health campaigns to increase social distancing during flu pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Education/methods , Persuasive Communication , Physical Distancing , Adult , Altruism , Female , Health Promotion/methods , Humans , Male , Risk Reduction Behavior , Self Efficacy , Social Values
7.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 422-431, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463960

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the public's need for quality health information that is understandable. This study aimed to identify (1) the extent to which COVID-19 messaging by state public health departments is understandable, actionable, and clear; (2) whether materials produced by public health departments are easily readable; (3) relationships between material type and understandability, actionability, clarity, and reading grade level; and (4) potential strategies to improve public health messaging around COVID-19. METHODS: Based on US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics from June 30, 2020, we identified the ten states with the most COVID-19 cases and selected forty-two materials (i.e., webpages, infographics, and videos) related to COVID-19 prevention according to predefined eligibility criteria. We applied three validated health literacy tools (i.e., Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool, CDC Clear Communication Index, and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level) to assess material understandability, actionability, clarity, and readability. We also analyzed correlations between scores on the three health literacy tools and material types. RESULTS: Overall, COVID-19 materials had high understandability and actionability but could be improved in terms of clarity and readability. Material type was significantly correlated with understandability, actionability, and clarity. Infographics and videos received higher scores on all tools. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our findings, we recommend public health entities apply a combination of these tools when developing health information materials to improve their understandability, actionability, and clarity. We also recommend using infographics and videos when possible, taking a human-centered approach to information design, and providing multiple modes and platforms for information delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Education/methods , Health Literacy , Health Promotion/methods , Information Dissemination/methods , Public Health/education , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , State Government , United States
8.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 37, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448492

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has seriously affected people's mental health and changed their behaviors. Previous studies for mental state and behavior promotion only targeted limited people or were not suitable for daily activity restrictions. Therefore, we decided to explore the effect of health education videos on people's mental state and health-related behaviors. METHODS: Based on WeChat, QQ, and other social media, we conducted an online survey by snowball sampling. Spearman's non-parametric method was used to analyze the correlation related to mental health problems and health-related behaviors. Besides, we used binary logistic regression analyses to examine mental health problems and health-related behaviors' predictors. We performed SPSS macro PROCESS (model 4 and model 6) to analyze mediation relationships between exposure to health education videos and depression/anxiety/health-related behaviors. These models were regarded as exploratory. RESULTS: Binary logistic regression analyses indicated that people who watched the health education videos were more likely to wear masks (OR 1.15, p < 0.001), disinfect (OR 1.26, p < 0.001), and take temperature (OR 1.37, p < 0.001). With higher level of posttraumatic growth (PTG) or perceived social support (PSS), people had lower percentage of depression (For PSS, OR 0.98, p < 0.001; For PTG, OR 0.98, p < 0.01) and anxiety (For PSS, OR 0.98, p < 0.001; For PTG, OR 0.98, p = 0.01) and better health behaviors. The serial multiple-mediation model supported the positive indirect effects of exposure to health education videos on the depression and three health-related behaviors through PSS and PTG (Depression: B[SE] = - 0.0046 [0.0021], 95% CI - 0.0098, - 0.0012; Mask-wearing: B[SE] = 0.0051 [0.0023], 95% CI 0.0015, 0.0010; Disinfection: B[SE] = 0.0059 [0.0024], 95% CI 0.0024, 0.0012; Temperature-taking: B[SE] = 0.0067 [0.0026], 95% CI 0.0023, 0.0013). CONCLUSION: Exposure to health education videos can improve people's self-perceived social support and inner growth and help them cope with the adverse impact of public health emergencies with better mental health and health-related behaviors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Behavior , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , China , Female , Health Education/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Social Support , Young Adult
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2126635, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441916

ABSTRACT

Importance: Ensuring widespread uptake of available COVID-19 vaccinations, each with different safety and efficacy profiles, is essential to combating the unfolding pandemic. Objective: To test communication interventions that may encourage the uptake of less-preferred vaccines. Design, Setting, and Participants: This online survey was conducted from March 24 to 30, 2021, using a nonprobability convenience sample of Canadian citizens aged 18 years or older, with quota sampling to match 2016 Canadian Census benchmarks on age, gender, region, and language. Respondents completed a 2-by-2-by-2 factorial experiment with random assignment of brand (AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson), information about the vaccine's effectiveness against symptomatic infection (yes or no), and information about the vaccine's effectiveness at preventing death from COVID-19 (yes or no) before being asked about their willingness to receive their assigned vaccine and their beliefs about its effectiveness. Exposures: Respondents were randomly assigned a vaccine brand (AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson) and information about the vaccine's effectiveness against symptomatic COVID-19 infection (yes or no) and at preventing death from COVID-19 (yes or no). Main Outcomes and Measures: Respondents' self-reported likelihood of taking their assigned vaccine if offered (response categories: very likely, somewhat likely, not very likely, or not at all likely, scaled 0-1) and their beliefs about their assigned vaccine's effectiveness (response categories: very effective, somewhat effective, not very effective, or not at all effective, scaled 0-1) were measured. Results: A total of 2556 Canadian adults responded to the survey (median [IQR] age, 50 [34-63] years; 1339 women [52%]). The self-reported likelihood of taking an assigned AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson vaccine was higher for respondents given information about their assigned vaccine's effectiveness at preventing death from COVID-19 (b, 0.04; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.06) and lower among those given information about its overall effectiveness at preventing symptomatic transmission (b, -0.03; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.00), compared with those who were not given the information. Perceived effectiveness was also higher among those given information about their assigned vaccine's effectiveness at preventing death from COVID-19 (b, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.05) and lower among those given information about their assigned vaccine's overall efficacy at preventing symptomatic infection (b, -0.05; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.03), compared with those who were not given this information. The interaction between these treatments was neither substantively nor statistically significant. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that providing information on the effectiveness of less-preferred vaccines at preventing death from COVID-19 is associated with more confidence in their effectiveness and less vaccine-specific hesitancy. These results can inform public health communication strategies to reduce hesitancy toward specific COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Education/methods , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Treatment Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Canada , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Persuasive Communication , Self Report , Treatment Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
10.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257252, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Teaching work is stressful, moreover during the pandemic teachers' stress might have been intensified by distance education as well as by limited access to social support, which functions as a buffer in experiencing stress. The aim of the research was to investigate the relation between distance education and teachers' well-being, and their close relations and other social relations during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The research was conducted in two stages on 285 Polish primary and secondary school teachers who were recruited by means of the chain referral method. The following measures were used: The Depression Anxiety & Stress Scales-21, Berlin Social Support Scales, The Relationship Satisfaction Scale and The Injustice Experience Questionnaire. RESULTS: The teachers experienced at least mild levels of stress, anxiety and depression, both during the first as well as the second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland. It has been confirmed that there is a negative relation between relationship quality change and social relations quality change, and stress, anxiety and depression. The variables taken into consideration in the research have provided the explanation for the variation of stress-from 6% in the first stage of the research to 47% in the second stage; for the variation of anxiety-from 21% to 31%; and for the variation of depression-from 12% to 46%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The research results show that due to distance work the distinction between professional work and family life might have been blurred, and as a consequence teachers' well-being could have been worsened. The isolation put on to stop the spreading of the virus might have contributed to changes in social relations, in close relations in particular, and at the same time negatively influenced teachers' abilities to effectively cope with the crisis situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , School Teachers/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Health Education/methods , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Mental Health , Personal Satisfaction , Poland , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Support , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 139(11): 1165-1172, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412933

ABSTRACT

Importance: Myopia is a common cause of vision loss, and its prevalence is increasing globally. Objective: To evaluate the effects of school-based family health education via WeChat in raising parents' awareness of myopia prevention and behavior and in controlling the development of myopia in children. Design, Setting, and Participants: A single-masked cluster randomized clinical trial of children was conducted from October 1, 2018, to December 31, 2020, among grade 1 students from 12 primary schools in Guangzhou, China. The 12 primary schools were randomly selected in 2 districts and randomized to the intervention and control groups. All grade 1 students were invited to participate, and 688 students were included in the intervention group and 752 in the control group. Interventions: Weekly health education via the social media platform WeChat was provided to the parents in the intervention group. Main Outcomes and Measures: Data include results of eye examinations of children and questionnaires completed by parents. The primary outcome was the 2-year cumulative incidence rate of myopia. Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error (sphere of +0.5 cylinder) of at least -0.50 diopters (D). The secondary outcomes were the 2-year changes in the axis length and SE refraction, parental awareness, children's screen time, outdoor activities, and learning tools during COVID-19. Results: Among the 1525 children included at baseline (835 boys [54.8%]; mean [SD] age, 6.3 [0.5] years), 1244 competed the final assessment; the 2-year cumulative incidence rate of myopia was 106 of 544 (19.5%) in the intervention group and 171 of 700 (24.4%) in the control group (difference, 4.9% [95% CI, 0.3%-9.5%]; P = .04). The mean myopic shift in SE refraction in the intervention group (-0.82 D) was lower than that in the control group (-0.96 D; difference, -0.14 [95% CI, -0.22 to -0.06] D; P < .001). No difference in change in axial length was detected (difference, 0.02 [95% CI, -0.06 to 0.09] mm; P = .70). Conclusions and Relevance: School-based weekly family health education via WeChat resulted in a small decrease in the 2-year cumulative incidence rate of myopia with a difference in SE of less than 0.25 D not accompanied by any axial length differences. Whether these findings extrapolate elsewhere in the world or are clinically relevant in the short or long term remain to be determined. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry Identifier: ChiCTR1900022236.


Subject(s)
Health Education/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Myopia , Parents , Social Media , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , China , Female , Humans , Male , Myopia/epidemiology , Myopia/prevention & control , Refraction, Ocular , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256103, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405339

ABSTRACT

How do people balance concerns for general health and economic outcomes during a pandemic? And, how does the communication of this trade-off affect individual preferences? We address these questions using a field experiment involving around 2000 students enrolled in a large university in Italy. We design four treatments where the trade-off is communicated using different combinations of a positive framing that focuses on protective strategies and a negative framing which refers to potential costs. We find that positive framing on the health side induces students to give greater relevance to the health dimension. The effect is sizeable and highly effective among many different audiences, especially females. Importantly, this triggers a higher level of intention to adhere to social distancing and precautionary behaviors. Moreover, irrespective of the framing, we find a large heterogeneity in students' preferences over the trade-off. Economics students and students who have directly experienced the economic impact of the pandemic are found to give greater value to economic outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/economics , Costs and Cost Analysis , Persuasive Communication , Attitude , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Decision Making , Health Education/methods , Humans
13.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403855

ABSTRACT

(1) Background. Early nutrition and lifestyle before and during pregnancy, breastfeeding, infancy, and early childhood can affect the risk of developing common non-communicable diseases during adulthood such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. To support positive long-term outcomes, it is essential to debunk fake news and provide evidence-based nutritional recommendations. "Nutripedia-Informati per Crescere" is a new tool delivering information and education on appropriate nutrition of mothers and babies during pregnancy and the first years of life. (2) Methods. Nutripedia provides the readers with evidence-based scientific contents in an easy-to-access fashion through a website, a social media page and a personalized advice app called "Nutripedia Chatbot". (3) Results. Forty articles were published on Nutripedia website with more than 220,000 total views. Social channel activation via bloggers reached over 9 million parents. 14,698 users downloaded Nutripedia chatbot, through which a total of 1930 questions were directed to experts while over 24,000 responses were provided by the app. (4) Conclusions. The use of different communication tools delivering evidence-based nutritional information such as Nutripedia is increasing and could offer supportive strategies to provide scientific information to large audiences and contribute fighting fake news. Future research could investigate the effectiveness of this important health campaign.


Subject(s)
Communication , Communications Media , Health Education/methods , Internet , Maternal-Child Health Services , Nutritional Status , Adult , Blogging , Breast Feeding , Child, Preschool , Counseling , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Information Dissemination , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Social Media
16.
Br J Sports Med ; 55(16): 906-911, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334550

ABSTRACT

ObjectivesOur large-scale cluster randomised controlled trial aimed to investigate the effects on health knowledge and enjoyment of an 11 week 'health education through football' programme for children aged 10-12 years old. Methods 3127 Danish school children (49% girls) aged 10-12 years from a total of 154 schools located in 63% of the Danish municipalities (69 of 98) took part in the analysis. A 5:1 cluster randomisation was performed at school level for the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG). The twice-weekly 45 min intervention was the '11 for Health in Denmark' programme, which includes health education, football drills and small-sided games. The health education element focused on hygiene, nutrition, physical activity and well-being. Outcomes: The participants completed a 34-item multiple-choice computer-based health knowledge questionnaire preintervention and postintervention. IG also evaluated whether the programme was enjoyable. Results Between-group differences (p<0.05) were observed in overall health knowledge in favour of IG (+7.2% points, 95% CI 6.1% to 8.4%, effect size, ES:0.59), with similar effects for girls (+7.4% points, 95% CI 5.9% to 9.0%, ES:0.57) and for boys (+7.0% points, 95% CI 5.3% to 8.7%, p<0.05, ES:0.51). Marked between-group differences were observed in favour of IG, for health knowledge related to hygiene (IG vs CG:+13.9% points, 95% CI 11.1% to 16.7%, ES:0.53), nutrition (+10.3% points, 95% CI 8.5% to 12.1%, ES:0.53), physical activity (+5.9% points, 95% CI 4.1% to 7.7%, ES:0.36) and well-being (+4.4% points, 95% CI 2.7% to 6.1%, ES:0.28). Both girls and boys gave the programme moderate to high scores for enjoyment (3.6±1.0 and 3.7±1.1, respectively). Conclusion Health education through sport, using the '11 for Health' model, was enjoyable for girls and boys aged 10-12 years old, and improved health knowledge related to hygiene, nutrition, physical activity and well-being.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Health Education/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hygiene/education , Nutritional Status , Physical Education and Training/methods , Soccer , Child , Denmark , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Pediatr Clin North Am ; 68(5): 1103-1118, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240538

ABSTRACT

Limiting exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has been the major principle guiding public health measures. Masking, social distancing, as well as frequent hand hygiene have been the chief nonpharmaceutical interventions as preventive strategies for all age groups. Advancement in vaccine development and vaccination of large populations offer a glimmer of hope for containing and ending this pandemic. However, until immunization is widespread in the community, masking, social distancing, and frequent handwashing, as well as early detection and isolation of infected persons, should be continued to curb the spread of illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Health Education/methods , Quarantine/standards , Adolescent , Child , Hand Disinfection/standards , Humans , Public Health , Social Isolation
19.
Can J Public Health ; 112(4): 599-619, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239229

ABSTRACT

SETTING: This knowledge mobilization project was conceptualized to increase awareness among breastfeeding mothers and the general public on safe infant feeding practices during the COVID-19 pandemic by addressing myths and misconceptions associated with breastfeeding practices, guiding breastfeeding mothers to make informed decisions around child feeding practices, and offering meaningful guidance in simple language through a short online animated video. INTERVENTION: This project was undertaken in four phases. During phase 1, an informal discussion was held with the breastfeeding mothers, service providers, and community partner in identifying issues surrounding lactation counselling facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. During phase 2, recommendations from 23 organizations with regard to breastfeeding during COVID-19 were reviewed and analyzed. During phase 3, using evidence from reliable sources, a 5-minute animated e-resource on breastfeeding during COVID-19 was conceptualized and developed. During phase 4, the e-resource was disseminated to the breastfeeding mothers, general public, post-secondary institutions, and organizations providing services to breastfeeding mothers in Canada. OUTCOMES: This evidence-based e-resource facilitated addressing misconceptions around breastfeeding during COVID-19 and raising public awareness on safe infant feeding practices during this pandemic. Overall, the video was described as an informative, user-friendly, useful, and easily accessible resource by breastfeeding mothers who were in self-isolation with little access to healthcare services during the pandemic. IMPLICATIONS: This project highlighted the importance of patient engagement and collaboration with the community partner in protecting breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic. It further illustrated how informational e-resources can protect breastfeeding in situations where breastfeeding mothers' access to healthcare services is compromised.


RéSUMé: LIEU: Notre projet de mobilisation des connaissances vise à sensibiliser les mères allaitantes et le grand public aux pratiques d'alimentation sûres pour les nourrissons durant la pandémie de COVID-19 en abordant les mythes et les idées fausses associés aux pratiques d'allaitement maternel, en aidant les mères allaitantes à prendre des décisions éclairées quant aux pratiques d'alimentation des bébés et en offrant des conseils utiles, en langage simple, dans une courte vidéo animée accessible en ligne. INTERVENTION: Le projet a été mené en quatre phases. Pendant la phase 1, nous avons eu une discussion informelle avec les mères allaitantes, les dispensateurs de services et le  partenaire associatif pour définir les problèmes entourant les services-conseils sur la lactation durant la pandémie de COVID-19. Pendant la phase 2, nous avons vu et analysé les recommandations de 23 organismes concernant l'allaitement durant la COVID-19. Pendant la phase 3, à l'aide de données probantes provenant de sources fiables, nous avons conceptualisé et créé une cyberressource animée de cinq minutes sur l'allaitement durant la COVID-19. Pendant la phase 4, nous avons diffusé cette cyberressource aux mères allaitantes, au grand public, à des établissements d'enseignement postsecondaires et à des organismes de services aux mères allaitantes au Canada. RéSULTATS: Cette cyberressource factuelle a permis d'aborder plus facilement les idées fausses entourant l'allaitement durant la COVID-19 et de sensibiliser le public aux pratiques sûres d'alimentation des nourrissons durant la pandémie. Dans l'ensemble, des mères allaitantes en isolement, qui avaient peu accès aux services de soins de santé durant la pandémie, ont trouvé notre vidéo informative, conviviale, utile et facilement accessible. CONSéQUENCES: Ce projet souligne l'importance du contact avec la patiente et de la collaboration avec le partenaire associatif pour protéger l'allaitement maternel durant la pandémie. Il montre aussi que des ressources informationnelles accessibles en ligne peuvent protéger l'allaitement dans les situations où les mères allaitantes ont moins accès aux services de soins de santé.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Education/methods , Mothers/education , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mothers/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL