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2.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(5): 780-782, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275610

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare professionals and academic facilities are called to provide leadership in disseminating accurate and timely information through approaches that meet the needs of the public. Graduate students from a university in Taiwan collaborated with experts to provide interactive live broadcasting sessions on the COVID-related topics to the public through the Facebook platform. The broadcasting sessions also trained the students to communicate COVID-related information through succinct and interactive presentations. Twelve broadcasting sessions were conducted twice a week for three weeks in May 2020. Upon completion of the broadcasting sessions, students demonstrated growth in professional confidence, assessment of the public's knowledge gaps and needs, and preparation and delivery of professional live broadcasts. We recommend creating a live broadcast training application through an artificial intelligence (AI) expert system. Multidisciplinary academic-practice collaboration in preparing for the broadcasting and engaging in dialogues with the public is recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Nursing, Graduate , Empowerment , Health Education/organization & administration , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Taiwan
3.
Health Educ Behav ; 48(3): 371-375, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269854

ABSTRACT

Anti-Asian racism and violence dramatically increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, recent studies and reports are showing that the health and well-being of Asian Americans are negatively affected. To address this urgent problem, the field of health education and public health must be equipped with the critical frameworks and concepts to analyze racism and White supremacy and how it affects the health and well-being of Asian Americans. We argue that using an ethnic studies lens in health education can help educators, researchers, and practitioners teach and train health educators to address racism experienced by Asian Americans during COVID-19 in relation to their health. We will discuss the elements of ethnic studies and demonstrate how to use it as a lens in understanding health disparities in the Asian American population influenced and exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/education , COVID-19/ethnology , Cultural Competency , Health Education/organization & administration , Racism/psychology , Health Education/standards , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health/ethnology , United States
4.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929280, 2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND In addition to sociodemographic and COVID-19- related factors, the needs of school support, including material, psychological and information support, have seldom been discussed as factors influencing anxiety and depression among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 3351 college students from China were surveyed through questionnaires about their sociodemographic and COVID-19 characteristics, the needs of school support, and their experiences with anxiety and depression. RESULTS Anxiety and depression were reported by 6.88% and 10.50% of students, respectively. Married, higher education, non-medical, and urban students had significantly higher risks of anxiety or depression. Additionally, symptoms such as cough and fever, especially when following a possible contact with suspected individuals, quarantine history of a personal contact, going out 1-3 times a week, not wearing a mask, and spending 2-3 hours browsing COVID-19-related information were significantly associated with the occurrence of anxiety or depression. Those who used methods to regulate their emotional state, used a psychological hotline, and who had visited a psychiatrist showed higher anxiety or depression. Those who used online curricula and books, used preventive methods for COVID-19, and who had real-time information about the epidemic situation of the school showed lower anxiety and depression. CONCLUSIONS In addition to sociodemographic and COVID-19-related aspects, students' needs for psychological assistance and information from schools were also associated with anxiety and depression among college students.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Schools/organization & administration , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Female , Financial Support , Health Education/organization & administration , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Hotlines/organization & administration , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Psychosocial Support Systems , Schools/economics , Schools/standards , Socioeconomic Factors , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
5.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(3): 132-136, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171772

ABSTRACT

School nurses are advocates, caregivers, and teachers. It is the responsibility of school nurses to understand current prevention and treatment options. In understanding how and why coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccines work, school nurses are in a trusted position to explain and advocate vaccination to students and their caregivers. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccine is a product of the latest scientific and medical technology. A better understanding of how and why this vaccination is effective may prevent vaccination hesitancy and provide reassurance to those choosing to accept vaccination. In December 2020, the National Association of School Nurses publicized its support for vaccination against COVID-19. As the COVID-19 pandemic lingers school nurses will step toward the front line to aid in the abatement of poor public health outcomes that may be severely affecting their schools, students, and caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Education/organization & administration , School Nursing/organization & administration , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data
6.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(2): 166-176, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147881

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unprecedented challenges to the U.S. mental healthcare system. Immediate action has been required to transform existing social work practice models to ensure uninterrupted delivery of essential mental health services. This paper describes how clinicians in a residential program, who offered an in-person multi-family education workshop, rapidly pivoted in the context of the pandemic to develop and implement an alternative and unique multi-family intervention model - a virtual family town hall. This innovative telehealth practice model serves as an exemplar of best practices amidst the COVID-19 pandemic as it prioritized health and safety, increased accessibility, and allowed clinicians to effectively respond to family members' heightened informational needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Family , Health Education/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Social Work/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Comorbidity , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Program Development , Program Evaluation , Residential Facilities/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
7.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(3): 156-163, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097064

ABSTRACT

School-located vaccination events (SLVE) have a long history in the United States and have successfully contributed to lower morbidity and mortality due to vaccine-preventable diseases. The school is an ideal place to reach children from all cultures, socioeconomic groups, and age-groups and is conveniently situated in communities for ease of accessibility for students, parents, and staff alike. School nurses play an important role in planning for SLVE and are ideally positioned to initiate this process and provide accurate information, dispelling myths about vaccines. Because school nurses are considered a trusted source of health information by the school community, they can provide valuable education on the impact of vaccination on student and staff attendance. Conducting a successful SLVE requires research, planning, and partnerships, and these partnerships are needed both within the school setting and outside this setting, within the community at large. The proliferation of the current COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent vaccine production has caused school nurses to take the lead in preparing for mass vaccination clinics in order to help mitigate this serious public health threat. This manuscript describes the process a group of school nurses used to develop SLVE plans in response to a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Education/organization & administration , School Nursing/organization & administration , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data
8.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 106-116, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069153

ABSTRACT

The issue of dating and sexual violence (DSV) on college campuses has received increased attention nationwide as a criminal justice and public health issue. College and university employed social workers play a critical role in preventing and responding to campus DSV through direct clinical services to students as well as prevention through educational programming and training. COVID-19 has negative implications for DSV student victims, as well as service delivery and accessibility. This paper examines the innovative methods used by university employed social work clinicians and educators to meet evolving mental health care needs and continue violence prevention services during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Sex Offenses/psychology , Social Work/organization & administration , Universities/organization & administration , Counseling/organization & administration , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Offenses/prevention & control , Telemedicine/organization & administration
11.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 146, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954348

ABSTRACT

Risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) is a key pillar in public health emergency response that ensures accurate health information sharing, adoption of protective behaviours by the affected people, and collaborative participation by all stakeholders, including of the local community structures. The success of RCCE programmes rely on strong partnerships and engagement among affiliated groups; clear programme plans and guidelines; establishment of well-laid down coordination structures; and clear measures for reporting and documentation of programme activities. RCCE activities during public health emergencies must put more emphasis on strengthening local structures and communities to ensure active participation of communities in interrupting disease transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Community Participation , Health Education/methods , Public Health/methods , Documentation , Emergencies , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 146, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-946296

ABSTRACT

Prevention of exposure to the COVID-19 virus in the general population is an essential strategy to slow community transmission. This paper shares the experiences and challenges of community engagement in COVID-19 prevention in the Kilimanjaro region, Northern Tanzania implemented by our team from the Institute of Public Health (IPH), Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMUCo) in collaboration with the COVID-19 response team in the Moshi Municipality. We conducted an education session with the COVID-19 response team and together brainstormed transmission hotspots and which interventions would be most feasible in their settings. The first hotspot identified was crowded local market spaces. Suggested interventions included targeted and mass public health education through the engagement of market opinion leaders, public announcements, and radio shows. We conducted participatory rural appraisal techniques to enable market vendors and clients to visualize two-meter distances and provided a prototype hand-washing facility that was foot operated. We found mass public health educational campaigns essential to inform and update the public about COVID-19 pandemic and to address rumors and misinformation, which hampers compliance with public health interventions. Coordinated efforts among stakeholders in the country are necessary to develop context-specific prevention and case management strategies following the national and international guidelines. Local ownership of recommended interventions is necessary to ensure compliance.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Community Participation , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Hand Disinfection/instrumentation , Health Education/methods , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Leadership , Mass Media , Mobile Applications , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Private Facilities , Public Health , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation , Tanzania/epidemiology
14.
Health Commun ; 36(1): 42-49, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939494

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 created a substantial set of challenges for health communication practitioners in the process of planning, implementing, and evaluating entertainment-education (EE) campaigns. EE is a theory and evidence-based communication strategy that employs entertainment media for educational messaging. Here, we briefly review EE campaigns in response to previous health emergencies and present three cases of EE responses to the COVID-19 pandemic from leading global organizations (PCI Media, BBC Media Action, and Sesame Workshop). Responses ranged from adaptation and re-distribution of existing content to creating new content under social-distancing restrictions and utilizing transmedia. These cases demonstrate that EE initiatives responding to future pandemics may be well served by starting with existing infrastructure to quickly build capacity, support, and trust; working with partners to tailor programs to the local context; and continuing to focus on good storytelling while simultaneously considering evolving media formats and theory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Communication/methods , Health Education/organization & administration , Mass Media , Narration , Capacity Building , Cultural Competency , Humans , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Trust
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e21820, 2020 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616134

ABSTRACT

In this issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the World Health Organization (WHO) is presenting a framework for managing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infodemic. Infodemiology is now acknowledged by public health organizations and the WHO as an important emerging scientific field and critical area of practice during a pandemic. From the perspective of being the first "infodemiologist" who originally coined the term almost two decades ago, I am positing four pillars of infodemic management: (1) information monitoring (infoveillance); (2) building eHealth Literacy and science literacy capacity; (3) encouraging knowledge refinement and quality improvement processes such as fact checking and peer-review; and (4) accurate and timely knowledge translation, minimizing distorting factors such as political or commercial influences. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, the United Nations has advocated that facts and science should be promoted and that these constitute the antidote to the current infodemic. This is in stark contrast to the realities of infodemic mismanagement and misguided upstream filtering, where social media platforms such as Twitter have advertising policies that sideline science organizations and science publishers, treating peer-reviewed science as "inappropriate content."


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Education/methods , Health Education/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health/methods , Social Media/organization & administration , Social Media/standards , World Health Organization/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Education/standards , Health Literacy , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Politics , Public Health/education , Public Health/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/supply & distribution
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