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2.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(4): 327-329, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865018
3.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(4 Suppl 4): S166-S170, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865017

ABSTRACT

The distribution of power in society is "upstream of the upstream" social determinants of health, and community organizers redistribute power to change social and political systems that shape health. Power-building Partnerships for Health (PPH) was launched in 2018 and pairs local public health departments and community organizing groups to support transformational health equity work, prioritizing trust and relationship building as precursors for action. Through PPH, the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department partnered with 2 grassroots organizations, CAUSE and MICOP. This partnership led to their launching a Latinx Indigenous Migrant Health COVID-19 Task Force and to the passing of a first-of-its-kind Health Officer Order on safety in farmworker housing. This practice brief discusses the importance of relationship building and key activities within PPH, and the roles of both the health department and community organizers in taking action to advance health equity in Santa Barbara County during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Farmers , Humans , Public Health
4.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(4 Suppl 4): S159-S165, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865014

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) integrated 3 intentional teams into their novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) response to ensure equity was not lost in the speed of response. IMPLEMENTATION: These teams-the Cultural, Faith, and Disability Communities Branch, Tribal COVID-19 Healthcare Team, and Vaccine Equity Branch were able to reach communities through trusted partners, elevate the voices of communities most impacted, respect tribal sovereignty, establish equity leadership, and set equity goals and metrics. LESSONS LEARNED: The top-down nature of incident command, combined with pre-COVID-19 systems and structures that impede equity, led to both barriers and opportunities for centering equity in response efforts. Inclusion of staff and community voice in decisions and guidance leads to better results; each community's unique needs have to be considered. Equity metrics and goals help direct resources to the most disadvantaged. State, local, and tribal public health infrastructure was built quickly and needs ongoing resources to be sustained. FUTURE INVESTMENTS: MDH is leveraging new funding to embed successful response structures into the organization. These structures are intended to build state, local, and tribal capacity and address systemic challenges at MDH. CONCLUSION: While equity can be incorporated into pandemic response and incident command structures, ongoing investment to support public health infrastructure is vital to sustaining equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Minnesota/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JAMA ; 327(18): 1757-1758, 2022 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864217
6.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(5): 749-750, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1863263
7.
Nature ; 605(7910): S21-S23, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860321
8.
Nature ; 605(7910): S2, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860318

Subject(s)
Health Equity
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 834172, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855461

ABSTRACT

Health equity is a rather complex issue. Social context and economical disparities, are known to be determining factors. Cultural and educational constrains however, are also important contributors to the establishment and development of health inequities. As an important starting point for a comprehensive discussion, a detailed analysis of the literature corpus is thus desirable: we need to recognize what has been done, under what circumstances, even what possible sources of bias exist in our current discussion on this relevant issue. By finding these trends and biases we will be better equipped to modulate them and find avenues that may lead us to a more integrated view of health inequity, potentially enhancing our capabilities to intervene to ameliorate it. In this study, we characterized at a large scale, the social and cultural determinants most frequently reported in current global research of health inequity and the interrelationships among them in different populations under diverse contexts. We used a data/literature mining approach to the current literature followed by a semantic network analysis of the interrelationships discovered. The analyzed structured corpus consisted in circa 950 articles categorized by means of the Medical Subheadings (MeSH) content-descriptor from 2014 to 2021. Further analyses involved systematic searches in the LILACS and DOAJ databases, as additional sources. The use of data analytics techniques allowed us to find a number of non-trivial connections, pointed out to existing biases and under-represented issues and let us discuss what are the most relevant concepts that are (and are not) being discussed in the context of Health Equity and Culture.


Subject(s)
Health Equity , Bias , Semantic Web
12.
Can J Public Health ; 113(2): 204-208, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841736

ABSTRACT

In 2019, the Canadian Government released a national dementia strategy that identified the need to address the health inequity (e.g., avoidable, unfair, and unjust differences in health outcomes) and improve the human rights of people living with dementia. However, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having an inequitable impact on people with dementia in terms of mortality and human rights violations. As the new Omicron COVID-19 variant approaches its peak, our commentary highlights the need for urgent action to support people living with dementia and their care partners. More specifically, we argue that reducing COVID-19 inequities requires addressing underlying population-level factors known as the social determinants of health. Health disparities cannot be rectified merely by looking at mortality rates of people with dementia. Thus, we believe that improving the COVID-19 outcomes of people with dementia requires addressing key determinants such as where people live, their social supports, and having equitable access to healthcare services. Drawing on Canadian-based examples, we conclude that COVID-19 policy responses to the pandemic must be informed by evidence-informed research and collaborative partnerships that embrace the lived experience of diverse people living with dementia and their care partners.


RéSUMé: Dans sa stratégie nationale sur la démence publiée en 2019, le gouvernement canadien définissait le besoin de redresser les iniquités en santé (p. ex. les différences évitables, inéquitables et injustes dans les résultats cliniques) et de mieux faire respecter les droits humains des personnes vivant avec la démence. La pandémie de la nouvelle maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) touche cependant de façon inéquitable les personnes atteintes de démence sur le plan de la mortalité et des violations des droits humains. À l'heure où le nouveau variant Omicron de la COVID-19 est sur le point d'atteindre son pic, nous faisons valoir qu'il faut appliquer des mesures urgentes pour aider les personnes vivant avec la démence et leurs partenaires soignants. Plus précisément, pour atténuer les effets inégaux de la COVID-19, il faut aborder les facteurs populationnels sous-jacents ­ les déterminants sociaux de la santé. Les disparités de l'état de santé ne peuvent pas être corrigées par la simple observation des taux de mortalité chez les personnes atteintes de démence. Nous croyons donc que pour améliorer les résultats cliniques de la COVID-19 chez ces personnes, il faut aborder les grands déterminants comme leurs milieux de vie, leurs soutiens sociaux et l'équité d'accès aux services de soins de santé. À partir d'exemples canadiens, nous concluons que les interventions stratégiques contre la pandémie de COVID-19 doivent être éclairées par des études fondées sur des données probantes et par des partenariats de collaboration qui tiennent compte du vécu de toutes sortes de personnes vivant avec la démence et de leurs partenaires soignants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Health Equity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Canada/epidemiology , Dementia/epidemiology , Human Rights , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health
13.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 29-33, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841235

ABSTRACT

Minority populations have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and disparities have been noted in vaccine uptake. In the state of Arkansas, health equity strike teams (HESTs) were deployed to address vaccine disparities. A total of 13 470 vaccinations were administered by HESTs to 10 047 eligible people at 45 events. Among these individuals, 5645 (56.2%) were African American, 2547 (25.3%) were White, and 1068 (10.6%) were Hispanic. Vaccination efforts must specifically target populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):29-33. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306564).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Equity/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Arkansas , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Social Determinants of Health
14.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(5): 651-653, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833673

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic profoundly changed health care. Policy makers and health care leaders must evaluate the lessons learned from the pandemic and leverage telehealth innovations with an eye toward how such changes can advance health equity; drive high-quality, high-value, person-centered care; and promote affordability and sustainability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , United States
15.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(3): 218-223, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831524

ABSTRACT

With shortfalls of thousands of nurses throughout the United States, the need for nursing students to graduate and enter the workforce was critical even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Innovative nursing education models are needed to mitigate the staggering shortfall. For over 10 years, the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC) has been recognized as a successful pathway for students to achieve nursing degrees. The NMNEC is a collaborative partnership between university and community college nursing programs who offer a common curriculum and share common academic policies. Students in the community college setting choose an associate degree program or a co-enrolled associate degree/bachelor of science in nursing program. The NMNEC currently includes 16 nursing program sites throughout the state. The development of the NMNEC including its infrastructure, leadership council, committees, and involvement of program directors has contributed to the strength. The outcomes of NMNEC's nursing graduates have been exceptional with strong progression and NCLEX pass percentages. Since NMNEC's inception, diversity and health equity have been strong components of the NMNEC model and curriculum. The NMNEC model provides equity to students at rural community colleges to achieve a bachelor of science degree while remaining in their home settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Health Equity , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Health Promotion , Humans , New Mexico , Pandemics , United States
16.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis ; 71: 58-63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821441

ABSTRACT

Countless individuals in the United States continue to experience effects related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, such as job/business instability, the breaking down of school systems, isolation, and negative health consequences. There are, however, certain populations and communities that continue to be disproportionately affected, resulting in severe health outcomes, decreased quality of life, and alarmingly high death rates. These populations typically live in historically excluded communities and identify as persons of color. To advance health equity in these communities, healthy living (HL) strategies are paramount. In fact HL Medicine - getting sufficient physical activity, practicing good nutrition, maintaining a healthy body weight, and not smoking, can be a viable solution. Applying these concepts, particularly the promotion of physical activity, through community collaboration can advance the goals of social justice action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Quality of Life , Social Justice , United States/epidemiology
17.
Ethn Dis ; 32(2): 151-164, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818897

ABSTRACT

Inadequate attention to racial health equity is a common challenge to effective, reliable monitoring and mitigation of COVID-19 disparities. Efforts to monitor and mitigate COVID-19 disparities continue to be hampered by inadequacies in how surveillance systems collect, tabulate, and report COVID-19-related outcomes. We conducted environmental scans of existing public health surveillance systems and reporting standards, literature reviews, focus groups with surveillance experts, and consultations with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and an expert panel on surveillance to identify and explore strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in how existing systems monitor COVID-19 and their implications for addressing disparities in related outcomes. We present recommendations based on these reviews and propose a core minimum set of health indicators and best-practice standards for reporting these indicators by COVID-19 surveillance systems to monitor racial/ethnic and other disparities in the pandemic. These recommendations are relevant to monitoring disparities in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and may inform monitoring of future epidemics. This discussion is part of an effort by Project REFOCUS to develop syndemic surveillance systems for monitoring the intersecting pandemics of COVID-19 and racism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Racism , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
18.
Lancet ; 399(10331): 1223-1224, 2022 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815312
19.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604542, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809646

ABSTRACT

Since the WHO's "Influenza Pandemic Preparedness Plan" in 1999, pandemic preparedness plans at the international and national level have been constantly adapted with the common goal to respond early to outbreaks, identify risks, and outline promising interventions for pandemic containment. Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, public health experts have started to reflect on the extent to which previous preparations have been helpful as well as on the gaps in pandemic preparedness planning. In the present commentary, we advocate for the inclusion of social and ethical factors in future pandemic planning-factors that have been insufficiently considered so far, although social determinants of infection risk and infectious disease severity contribute to aggravated social inequalities in health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Health Equity , Influenza, Human , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Determinants of Health
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