Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 34
Filter
1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 29-33, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841235

ABSTRACT

Minority populations have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and disparities have been noted in vaccine uptake. In the state of Arkansas, health equity strike teams (HESTs) were deployed to address vaccine disparities. A total of 13 470 vaccinations were administered by HESTs to 10 047 eligible people at 45 events. Among these individuals, 5645 (56.2%) were African American, 2547 (25.3%) were White, and 1068 (10.6%) were Hispanic. Vaccination efforts must specifically target populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):29-33. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306564).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Equity/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Arkansas , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Social Determinants of Health
6.
Am J Public Health ; 111(8): 1489-1496, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381329

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its social and health impact have underscored the need for a new strategic science agenda for public health. To optimize public health impact, high-quality strategic science addresses scientific gaps that inform policy and guide practice. At least 6 scientific gaps emerge from the US experience with COVID-19: health equity science, data science and modernization, communication science, policy analysis and translation, scientific collaboration, and climate science. Addressing these areas within a strategic public health science agenda will accelerate achievement of public health goals. Public health leadership and scientists have an unprecedented opportunity to use strategic science to guide a new era of improved and equitable public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Equity/organization & administration , Health Planning/methods , Social Determinants of Health/statistics & numerical data , Health Policy , Humans , Public Health/standards , United States
7.
Healthc Q ; 24(2): 7-11, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323459

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for a robust and nimble public health data infrastructure. ICES - a government-sponsored, independent, non-profit research institute in Ontario, Canada - functions as a key component of a resilient information infrastructure and an enabler of data co-production, contributing to Ontario's response to the COVID-19 pandemic as part of a learning health system. Linked data on the cumulative incidence of infection and vaccination at the neighbourhood level revealed disparate uptake between areas with low versus high risk of COVID-19. These data were leveraged by the government, service providers, media and the public to inform a more efficient and equitable vaccination strategy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Learning Health System/organization & administration , Public Health Administration , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Health Equity/organization & administration , Humans , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Immunization Programs/statistics & numerical data , Learning Health System/methods , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Vaccination Coverage/organization & administration , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
Hepatology ; 74(5): 2808-2812, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248687

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and social justice movement have highlighted the impact of social determinants of health (SDOH) and structural racism in the United States on both access to care and patient outcomes. With the evaluation for liver transplantation being a highly subjective process, there are multiple ways for SDOH to place vulnerable patients at a disadvantage. This policy corner focuses on three different methods to reverse the deleterious effects of SDOH-identify and reduce implicit bias, expand and optimize telemedicine, and improve community outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity/organization & administration , Liver Transplantation , Racism/prevention & control , Social Determinants of Health/ethnology , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Humans , Liver Diseases/ethnology , Liver Diseases/surgery , Liver Transplantation/methods , Liver Transplantation/standards , Policy Making , Public Health/standards , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
12.
Glob Public Health ; 16(8-9): 1198-1208, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191802

ABSTRACT

The spread of the serve acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19, [WHO. (2019). Naming the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the virus that causes it. https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/technical-guidance/naming-the-coronavirus-disease-(covid-2019)-and-the-virus-that-causes-it] and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic is another in a long line of Coronavirus outbreak - and unlikely to be the last. More than a year into the pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 has exposed the dangerous hollowness of a global commitment to global health security. Global health security (GHS) has no uncontested definition, and despite ample pandemic warnings (HIV, H1N1, SARS, MERS-CoV, Ebola, Zika) the world, remains woefully unprepared for an adequate pandemic response; its lack of preparation the predicable result of inattention to equity and with it global health security. The first section of this paper lays out the particular challenges of COVID-19 for less well-resourced countries. The second part discusses the inequities being perpetuated and accentuated in the development and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. The third section discusses ways to address these global inequities and its related complexities. We conclude by restating some of the key priorities for achieving GHS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Health Equity , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Equity/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vulnerable Populations
13.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 106(12): e4887-e4902, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175358

ABSTRACT

Unacceptable healthcare disparities in endocrine disease have persisted for decades, and 2021 presents a difficult evolving environment. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the gross structural inequities that drive health disparities, and antiracism demonstrations remind us that the struggle for human rights continues. Increased public awareness and discussion of disparities present an urgent opportunity to advance health equity. However, it is more complicated to change the behavior of individuals and reform systems because societies are polarized into different factions that increasingly believe, accept, and live different realities. To reduce health disparities, clinicians must (1) truly commit to advancing health equity and intentionally act to reduce health disparities; (2) create a culture of equity by looking inwards for personal bias and outwards for the systemic biases built into their everyday work processes; (3) implement practical individual, organizational, and community interventions that address the root causes of the disparities; and (4) consider their roles in addressing social determinants of health and influencing healthcare payment policy to advance health equity. To care for diverse populations in 2021, clinicians must have self-insight and true understanding of heterogeneous patients, knowledge of evidence-based interventions, ability to adapt messaging and approaches, and facility with systems change and advocacy. Advancing health equity requires both science and art; evidence-based roadmaps and stories that guide the journey to better outcomes, judgment that informs how to change the behavior of patients, providers, communities, organizations, and policymakers, and passion and a moral mission to serve humanity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Endocrine System Diseases/therapy , Healthcare Disparities , Patient Care , Racism , Biomedical Research/ethics , Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Endocrine System Diseases/epidemiology , Endocrine System Diseases/mortality , Health Equity/organization & administration , Health Equity/trends , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Policy/trends , Healthcare Disparities/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care/ethics , Patient Care/standards , Patient Care/trends , Racism/prevention & control , Racism/trends , SARS-CoV-2
14.
East Mediterr Health J ; 27(3): 217-219, 2021 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158926

ABSTRACT

Evidence has shown that some of the major causes of health inequities arise from the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age, in addition to a wider set of forces and systems shaping individuals' and societies' health and well-being. Such conditions are known as the 'social determinants of health'. However, efforts to address these determinants have remained challenging and unsatisfactory in many parts of the world, including in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Policies to contain the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have further exposed and amplified the existing and even created new dimensions in social and health inequities, as we elaborate further below. Meanwhile, the pandemic offers a unique opportunity to tackle inequities and build back fairer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Equity/organization & administration , Africa, Northern/epidemiology , Health Policy , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Middle East/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health , Socioeconomic Factors
17.
Int J Health Serv ; 51(3): 300-304, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121083

ABSTRACT

The full impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is yet to be well established; however, as the pandemic spreads, and early results emerge, unmet needs are being revealed, and pressing questions are being asked about who is most affected, how, where, and in what ways government responses might be exacerbating inequalities. A number of scholars have called for more in-depth critical research on COVID-19 and health inequalities to produce a strong empirical evidence based on these issues. There are also justifiable concerns about the scarcity of health-equity actions oriented analyses of the situation and calls for more empirical evidence on COVID-19 and health inequalities. A preliminary condition to establish this type of information is strong capacity to conduct health inequalities research. Worldwide, however, this type of capacity is limited, which, alongside other challenges, will likely hinder capacities of many countries to develop comprehensive equity-oriented COVID-19 analyses, and adequate responses to present and future crises. The current pandemic reinforces the pending need to invest in and strengthen these research capacities. These capacities must be supported by widespread recognition and concern, cognitive social capital, and greater commitment to coordinated, transparent action, and responsibility. Otherwise, we will remain inadequately prepared to respond and meet our society's unmet needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Health Status Disparities , Capacity Building/organization & administration , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Equity/organization & administration , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Emerg Med J ; 38(6): 474-476, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120760

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine has grown immensely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine provides a means to deliver clinical care while limiting patient and provider exposure to the COVID-19. As such, telemedicine is finding applications in a variety of clinical environments including primary care and the acute care setting and the array of patient populations who use telemedicine continues to grow. Yet as telehealth becomes ubiquitous, it is critical to consider its potential to exacerbate disparities in care. Challenges accessing technology and digital literacy, for example, disproportionately impact older patients and those living in poverty. When implemented with the consideration of health disparities, telemedicine provides an opportunity to address these inequities. This manuscript explores potential mechanisms by which telemedicine may play a role in exacerbating or ameliorating disparities in care. We further describe a framework and suggested strategies with which to implement telemedicine systems to improve health equity.


Subject(s)
Digital Divide , Health Equity/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Equity/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
19.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 57, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Differential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have brought deeply rooted inequities to the forefront, where increasing evidence has shown that racialized immigrant and migrant (im/migrant) populations face a disproportionate burden of COVID-19. Im/migrant communities may be worst affected by lockdowns and restrictive measures, face less opportunity to physically distance or stay home sick within 'essential' jobs, and experience severe barriers to healthcare. Insufficient attention to experiences of racialized im/migrants in current pandemic responses globally highlights an urgent need to more fulsomely address unmet health needs through an anti-racist, equity-oriented lens. This commentary aims to highlight the need for public health and clinical training, research, and policy to thoughtfully prioritize im/migrant health equity during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. MAIN TEXT: Global pandemic responses have neglected im/migrants by continuing to ignore or insufficiently address inequities, exacerbating COVID transmission, xenophobia, and occupational injustice. Deaths, illness, stress, and other negative outcomes of the overlapping epidemics of COVID-19 and structural racism disproportionately borne by racialized im/migrants suggest the urgent need for action. As evidence mounts about how im/migrants have been left behind in times of crises, we need enhanced focus on health equity within COVID-19 research and interventions, including research that examines and pursues structural interventions necessary to mitigate these impacts, and that identifies patterns and harms of xenophobic policy, structural racism, and white supremacy in shaping im/migrant health outcomes. We must also strengthen anti-racist and equity-oriented curriculum within health education, and ensure sufficient attention to the needs of im/migrant communities within public health, clinical, and research training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated and rendered more visible the deeply rooted health and social inequities faced by racialized im/migrants across diverse settings. We argue for a greater emphasis on equity-focused and anti-racist im/migrant health research, interventions, and training. Policymakers and practitioners must ensure that healthcare policies and practices do not exacerbate inequities, and instead meaningfully address unmet needs of communities, including racialized im/migrants. Ethical and respectful community engagement, commitment and collaboration with global, national, and local communities, policymakers, academics, and educators, as well as accountability across sectors, is critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrants and Immigrants , Health Equity/organization & administration , Public Health , Transients and Migrants , Humans
20.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 26, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social isolation among older adults raises major issues for equity in healthcare in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. MAIN TEXT: This commentary describes current challenges in preventing social isolation among older adults and proposes pathways to develop inclusive approaches to intervention in this vulnerable population. Building interventions that take account of structural inequities among older persons, as well as their subjective experiences, expectations and perspectives, appears fundamental to improve their health and quality of life in pandemic and post-pandemic contexts. CONCLUSIONS: We argue that equity-based and person-centered approaches are critical to counter the negative outcomes of social isolation in the vulnerable older population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity/organization & administration , Social Isolation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Vulnerable Populations
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL