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2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(11): e24460, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patient-centered health care information systems (PHSs) enable patients to take control and become knowledgeable about their own health, preferably in a secure environment. Current and emerging PHSs use either a centralized database, peer-to-peer (P2P) technology, or distributed ledger technology for PHS deployment. The evolving COVID-19 decentralized Bluetooth-based tracing systems are examples of disease-centric P2P PHSs. Although using P2P technology for the provision of PHSs can be flexible, scalable, resilient to a single point of failure, and inexpensive for patients, the use of health information on P2P networks poses major security issues as users must manage information security largely by themselves. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to identify the inherent security issues for PHS deployment in P2P networks and how they can be overcome. In addition, this study reviews different P2P architectures and proposes a suitable architecture for P2P PHS deployment. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted following PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) reporting guidelines. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis. We searched the following databases: IEEE Digital Library, PubMed, Science Direct, ACM Digital Library, Scopus, and Semantic Scholar. The search was conducted on articles published between 2008 and 2020. The Common Vulnerability Scoring System was used as a guide for rating security issues. RESULTS: Our findings are consolidated into 8 key security issues associated with PHS implementation and deployment on P2P networks and 7 factors promoting them. Moreover, we propose a suitable architecture for P2P PHSs and guidelines for the provision of PHSs while maintaining information security. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the clear advantages of P2P PHSs, the absence of centralized controls and inconsistent views of the network on some P2P systems have profound adverse impacts in terms of security. The security issues identified in this study need to be addressed to increase patients' intention to use PHSs on P2P networks by making them safe to use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Systems , Confidentiality , Humans , Patient-Centered Care , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Popul Health Metr ; 19(1): 44, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503922

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poor data quality is limiting the use of data sourced from routine health information systems (RHIS), especially in low- and middle-income countries. An important component of this data quality issue comes from missing values, where health facilities, for a variety of reasons, fail to report to the central system. METHODS: Using data from the health management information system in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the advent of COVID-19 pandemic as an illustrative case study, we implemented seven commonly used imputation methods and evaluated their performance in terms of minimizing bias in imputed values and parameter estimates generated through subsequent analytical techniques, namely segmented regression, which is widely used in interrupted time series studies, and pre-post-comparisons through paired Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. We also examined the performance of these imputation methods under different missing mechanisms and tested their stability to changes in the data. RESULTS: For regression analyses, there were no substantial differences found in the coefficient estimates generated from all methods except mean imputation and exclusion and interpolation when the data contained less than 20% missing values. However, as the missing proportion grew, k-NN started to produce biased estimates. Machine learning algorithms, i.e. missForest and k-NN, were also found to lack robustness to small changes in the data or consecutive missingness. On the other hand, multiple imputation methods generated the overall most unbiased estimates and were the most robust to all changes in data. They also produced smaller standard errors than single imputations. For pre-post-comparisons, all methods produced p values less than 0.01, regardless of the amount of missingness introduced, suggesting low sensitivity of Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to the imputation method used. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend the use of multiple imputation in addressing missing values in RHIS datasets and appropriate handling of data structure to minimize imputation standard errors. In cases where necessary computing resources are unavailable for multiple imputation, one may consider seasonal decomposition as the next best method. Mean imputation and exclusion and interpolation, however, always produced biased and misleading results in the subsequent analyses, and thus, their use in the handling of missing values should be discouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Systems , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 676838, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470769

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 crisis provides an opportunity to reflect on what worked during the pandemic, what could have been done differently, and what innovations should become part of an enhanced health information system in the future. Methods: An online qualitative survey was designed and administered online in November 2020 to all the 37 Member States that are part of the WHO European Health Information Initiative and the WHO Central Asian Republics Information Network. Results: Nineteen countries responded to the survey (Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom, and Uzbekistan). The COVID-19 pandemic required health information systems (HIS) to rapidly adapt to identify, collect, store, manage, and transmit accurate and timely COVID-19 related data. HIS stakeholders have been put to the test, and valuable experience has been gained. Despite critical gaps such as under-resourced public health services, obsolete health information technologies, and lack of interoperability, most countries believed that their information systems had worked reasonably well in addressing the needs arising during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: Strong enabling environments and advanced and digitized health information systems are vital to controlling epidemics. Sustainable finance and government support are required for the continued implementation and enhancement of HIS. It is important to promote digital solutions beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Now is the time to discuss potential solutions to obtain timely, accurate, and reliable health information and steer policy-making while protecting privacy rights and meeting the highest ethical standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Systems , Czech Republic , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
5.
6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(Suppl 1): 547, 2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430417

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited existing approaches to generate estimates from Routine Health Information Systems (RHIS) data, despite the growing interest to these data. We calculated and assessed the consistency of maternal and child health service coverage estimates from RHIS data, using census-based and health service-based denominators in Sierra Leone. METHODS: We used Sierra Leone 2016 RHIS data to calculate coverage of first antenatal care contact (ANC1), institutional delivery and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus 3 (DPT3) immunization service provision. For each indicator, national and district level coverages were calculated using denominators derived from two census-based and three health service-based methods. We compared the coverage estimates from RHIS data to estimates from MICS 2017. We considered the agreement adequate when estimates from RHIS fell within the 95% confidence interval of the survey estimate. RESULTS: We found an overall poor consistency of the coverage estimates calculated from the census-based methods. ANC1 and institutional delivery coverage estimates from these methods were greater than 100% in about half of the fourteen districts, and only 3 of the 14 districts had estimates consistent with the survey data. Health service-based methods generated better estimates. For institutional delivery coverage, five districts met the agreement criteria using BCG service-based method. We found better agreement for DPT3 coverage estimates using DPT1 service-based method as national coverage was close to survey data, and estimates were consistent for 8 out of 14 districts. DPT3 estimates were consistent in almost half of the districts (6/14) using ANC1 service-based method. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the challenge in determining an appropriate denominator for RHIS-based coverage estimates. Systematic and transparent data quality check and correction, as well as rigorous approaches to determining denominators are key considerations to generate accurate coverage statistics using RHIS data.


Subject(s)
Child Health Services , Health Information Systems , Maternal Health Services , Child , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Pregnancy , Sierra Leone/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(9)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412219

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health systems around the world. The objectives of this study are to estimate the overall effect of the pandemic on essential health service use and outcomes in Mexico, describe observed and predicted trends in services over 24 months, and to estimate the number of visits lost through December 2020. METHODS: We used health information system data for January 2019 to December 2020 from the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), which provides health services for more than half of Mexico's population-65 million people. Our analysis includes nine indicators of service use and three outcome indicators for reproductive, maternal and child health and non-communicable disease services. We used an interrupted time series design and linear generalised estimating equation models to estimate the change in service use and outcomes from April to December 2020. Estimates were expressed using average marginal effects on the risk ratio scale. RESULTS: The study found that across nine health services, an estimated 8.74 million patient visits were lost in Mexico. This included a decline of over two thirds for breast and cervical cancer screenings (79% and 68%, respectively), over half for sick child visits and female contraceptive services, approximately one-third for childhood vaccinations, diabetes, hypertension and antenatal care consultations, and a decline of 10% for deliveries performed at IMSS. In terms of patient outcomes, the proportion of patients with diabetes and hypertension with controlled conditions declined by 22% and 17%, respectively. Caesarean section rate did not change. CONCLUSION: Significant disruptions in health services show that the pandemic has strained the resilience of the Mexican health system and calls for urgent efforts to resume essential services and plan for catching up on missed preventive care even as the COVID-19 crisis continues in Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Systems , Cesarean Section , Child , Female , Health Services , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 134-140, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392948

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this synopsis, we give an overview of recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2020 in the field of Clinical Information Systems (CIS). METHOD: As CIS section editors, we annually apply a systematic process to retrieve articles for the International Medical Informatics Association Yearbook of Medical Informatics. For seven years now, we use the same query to find relevant publications in the CIS field. Each year we retrieve more than 2,400 papers which we categorize in a multi-pass review to distill a preselection of 15 candidate papers. External reviewers and yearbook editors then assess the selected candidate papers. Based on the review results, the IMIA Yearbook editorial board chooses up to four best publications for the section at a selection meeting. To get an overview of the content of the retrieved articles, we use text mining and term co-occurrence mapping techniques. RESULTS: We carried out the query in mid-January 2021 and retrieved a deduplicated result set of 2,787 articles from 1,135 different journals. We nominated 15 papers as candidates and finally selected four of them as the best papers in the CIS section. As in the previous years, the content analysis of the articles revealed the broad spectrum of topics covered by CIS research. Thus, this year we could observe a significant impact of COVID-19 on CIS research. CONCLUSIONS: The trends in CIS research, as seen in recent years, continue to be observable. What was very visible was the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has affected not only our lives but also CIS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Systems , Biomedical Research , Health Information Systems , Humans , Medical Informatics
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e051823, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334584

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Front-line health workers in remote health facilities are the first contact of the formal health sector and are confronted with life-saving decisions. Health information systems (HIS) support the collection and use of health related data. However, HIS focus on reporting and are unfit to support decisions. Since data tools are paper-based in most primary healthcare settings, we have produced an innovative Paper-based Health Information System in Comprehensive Care (PHISICC) using a human-centred design approach. We are carrying out a cluster randomised controlled trial in three African countries to assess the effects of PHISICC compared with the current systems. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Study areas are in rural zones of Côte d'Ivoire, Mozambique and Nigeria. Seventy health facilities in each country have been randomly allocated to using PHISICC tools or to continuing to use the regular HIS tools. We have randomly selected households in the catchment areas of each health facility to collect outcomes' data (household surveys have been carried out in two of the three countries and the end-line data collection is planned for mid-2021). Primary outcomes include data quality and use, coverage of health services and health workers satisfaction; secondary outcomes are additional data quality and use parameters, childhood mortality and additional health workers and clients experience with the system. Just prior to the implementation of the trial, we had to relocate the study site in Mozambique due to unforeseen logistical issues. The effects of the intervention will be estimated using regression models and accounting for clustering using random effects. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics committees in Côte d'Ivoire, Mozambique and Nigeria approved the trials. We plan to disseminate our findings, data and research materials among researchers and policy-makers. We aim at having our findings included in systematic reviews on health systems interventions and future guidance development on HIS. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: PACTR201904664660639; Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Health Information Systems , Child , Cote d'Ivoire , Data Accuracy , Humans , Mozambique , Nigeria , Primary Health Care , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
12.
Methods Inf Med ; 60(1-02): 32-48, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331415

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The electronic health record (EHR) has become increasingly ubiquitous. At the same time, health professionals have been turning to this resource for access to data that is needed for the delivery of health care and for clinical research. There is little doubt that the EHR has made both of these functions easier than earlier days when we relied on paper-based clinical records. Coupled with modern database and data warehouse systems, high-speed networks, and the ability to share clinical data with others are large number of challenges that arguably limit the optimal use of the EHR OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to provide an exhaustive reference for those who use the EHR in clinical and research contexts, but also for health information systems professionals as they design, implement, and maintain EHR systems. METHODS: This study includes a panel of 24 biomedical informatics researchers, information technology professionals, and clinicians, all of whom have extensive experience in design, implementation, and maintenance of EHR systems, or in using the EHR as clinicians or researchers. All members of the panel are affiliated with Penn Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and have experience with a variety of different EHR platforms and systems and how they have evolved over time. RESULTS: Each of the authors has shared their knowledge and experience in using the EHR in a suite of 20 short essays, each representing a specific challenge and classified according to a functional hierarchy of interlocking facets such as usability and usefulness, data quality, standards, governance, data integration, clinical care, and clinical research. CONCLUSION: We provide here a set of perspectives on the challenges posed by the EHR to clinical and research users.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records , Health Information Systems , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans
13.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254707, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315891

ABSTRACT

With the continued rise of the global incidence of COVID-19 infection and emergent second wave, the need to understand characteristics that impact susceptibility to infection, clinical severity, and outcomes remains vital. The objective of this study was to assess modifying effects of demographic factors on COVID-19 testing status and outcomes in a large, diverse single health system cohort. The Mount Sinai Health System de-identified COVID-19 database contained records of 39,539 patients entering the health system from 02/28/2020 to 06/08/2020 with 7,032 laboratory-confirmed cases. The prevalence of qRT-PCR nasopharyngeal swabs (χ2 = 665.7, p<0.0001) and case rates (χ2 = 445.3, p<0.0001) are highest in Hispanics and Black or African Americans. The likelihood of admission and/or presentation to an intensive care unit (ICU) versus non-ICU inpatient unit, emergency department, and outpatient services, which reflects the severity of the clinical course, was also modified by race and ethnicity. Females were less likely to be tested [Relative Risk(RR) = 1.121, p<0.0001], and males had a higher case prevalence (RR = 1.224, p<0.001). Compared to other major ethnic groups, Whites experienced a higher prevalence of mortality (p<0.05). Males experienced a higher risk of mortality (RR = 1.180, p = 0.0012) at relatively younger ages (70.58±11.75) compared to females (73.02±11.46) (p = 0.0004). There was an increased severity of disease in older patient populations of both sexes. Although Hispanic and Black or African American race was associated with higher testing prevalence and positive testing rates, the only disparity with respect to mortality was a higher prevalence in Whites.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/ethnology , Female , Health Information Systems/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Race Factors , Sex Factors
14.
Rom J Ophthalmol ; 65(2): 125-129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285635

ABSTRACT

Social Media in the COVID-19 pandemic context has become a real dissemination medium of ophthalmology information for both physicians and health care consumers. This trend of sharing information has revealed new and innovative interventions in Ophthalmology such as teleophthalmology on Social Media by providing synchronous and asynchronous consultations, education, and prevention solutions as well as scientific research findings. This paper is a review of the current challenges and limitations faced by ophthalmologists and health care consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information , Information Dissemination/methods , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/organization & administration , Health Information Systems , Humans , Information Centers , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine
15.
Psychiatriki ; 32(2): 99-102, 2021 Jul 10.
Article in Greek, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248520

ABSTRACT

The idea of a network of small devices that would be able to connect each other, appeared in the early 80s. In a prophetic article, Mark Weiser,1 described such a connection, that it is now known under the term of Internet of Things (IoT). In a broadest sense, the term IoT encompasses everything connected to the internet, but it is increasingly being used to define objects that "talk" to each other, creating a network from simple sensors to smartphones and wearables connected. During the recent years this network of communicating devices has been combined with other technological achievements, and particularly with the Virtual Reality (VR)2 and the Artificial Intelligence (AI).3 The emerge of COVID-19 pandemic in 2019, resulted to the poor response and healthcare failures of many countries globally.4 One of the main reasons for such a failure, was the inability of accurate data collection from different sources. Apparently, it was the first time, humanity realized the need for massive amounts of heterogeneous data to be collected, interpreted, and shared. Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, several innovators and public authorities are looking to leverage IoT tools to reduce the burden on the healthcare systems.5 Mental health is one of the areas that seems to benefit the most of such technologies. A significant decrease of the total amount of ER visits and a dramatic increase of internet access from the patients and care givers along to the development of applications for mental health issues, followed the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2.6 Such technologies proved to be efficient to help mentally ill patients and pioneer the path in the future. Probably the most obvious use of these emerged technologies is the improvement of the telehealth options. Patients who suffer from mental illness face significant problems towards the continuity of care during the crisis.7 Nonetheless, they usually have other health problems, that deprive them from an equitable health care provision. Improved telehealth platforms can give them a single point access to address all their problems. The use of electronic health records can reduce the fragmentary health services and improve the outcome.8 However, this is only the beginning. The COVID-19 crisis and the subsequent social isolation, to reduce both the contamination and the spread of the disease, highlighted the necessity for providing accurate and secure diagnoses and treatments from a safe distance. Virtual reality combined with IoT and AI technologies seem to be a reliable alternative to the classic physical and mental examination and treatment in many areas of mental and neurological diseases.2 These novel techniques can spot the early signs and detect mental illnesses with high accuracy. However, caution and more work are required to bridge the space between these recently thrived technologies and mental health care.7 It is worth mentioning, that internet-oriented health care procedures can also help to reduce the gaps caused by the stigma of mental illness. For example, the development of AI chatbots (an application used to chat directly with a human) can alleviate the fears of judgment of the help seeking persons and provide the professionals with a supplemental support toward improved services to their patients.9 A final remark for conclusion. Humanity is more and more depended to the "intelligent" machines. However, we must not forget that we humans are responsible to set the rules of such co-existence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Information Systems , Health Services Accessibility , Mental Health/trends , Social Interaction , Telemedicine/methods , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Health Information Systems/organization & administration , Health Information Systems/standards , Health Information Systems/trends , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet of Things , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Virtual Reality
16.
Appl Clin Inform ; 12(2): 399-406, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233762

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: After the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, Chinese hospitals and health information technology (HIT) vendors collaborated to provide comprehensive information technology support for pandemic prevention and control. This study aims to describe the responses from the health information systems (HIS) to the COVID-19 pandemic and provide empirical evidence in the application of emerging health technologies in China. METHODS: This observational descriptive study utilized a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey of hospitals in China (N = 1,014) from 30 provincial administrative regions across the country. Participants include hospital managers, hospital information workers, and health care providers. RESULTS: Among all the responses, the most popular interventions and applications include expert question-and-answer sessions and science popularization (61.74%) in online medical consultation, online appointment registration (58.97%) in online medical service, and remote consultation (75.15%) in telehealth service. A total of 63.71% of the participating hospitals expanded their fever clinics during the pandemic, 15.38% hospitals used new or upgraded mobile ward rounds systems, and 44.68% hospitals applied online self-service systems. Challenges and barriers include protecting network information security (57.00%) since some hospitals experienced cybersecurity incidents. 71.79% participants hope to shorten wait time and optimize the treatment process. Health care workers experienced increased amount of work during the pandemic, while hospital information departments did not experience significant changes in their workload. CONCLUSION: In the process of fighting against the COVID-19, hospitals have widely used traditional and emerging novel HITs. These technologies have strengthened the capacity of prevention and control of the pandemic and provided comprehensive information technology support while also improving accessibility and efficiency of health care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Information Systems , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Computer Security , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Health Information Systems/trends , Hospital Information Systems/trends , Hospitals/classification , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Remote Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231461

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The aim of this study is to provide a better understanding of the requirements to improve routine health information systems (RHISs) for the management of health systems, including the identification of best practices, opportunities, and challenges in the 53 countries and territories of the WHO European region. (2) Methods: We conducted an overview of systematics reviews and searched the literature in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Web of Science electronic databases. After a meticulous screening, we identified 20 that met the inclusion criteria, and RHIS evaluation results were presented according to the Performance of Routine Information System Management (PRISM) framework. (3) Results: The reviews were published between 2007 and 2020, focusing on the use of different systems or technologies and aimed to analyze interventions on professionals, centers, or patients' outcomes. All reviews examined showed variability in results in accordance with the variability of interventions and target populations. We have found different areas for improvement for RHISs according to the three determinants of the PRISM framework that influence the configuration of RHISs: technical, organizational, or behavioral elements. (4) Conclusions: RHIS interventions in the European region are promising. However, new global and international strategies and the development of tools and mechanisms should be promoted to highly integrate platforms among European countries.


Subject(s)
Health Information Systems , Europe , Humans , Information Management , Information Systems , Systematic Reviews as Topic
18.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(5): 381-387A, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218473

ABSTRACT

In the context of declining economic growth, now exacerbated by the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, Papua New Guinea is increasing the efficiency of its health systems to overcome difficulties in reaching global health and development targets. Before 2015, the national health information system was fragmented, underfunded, of limited utility and accessed infrequently by health authorities. We built an electronic system that integrated mobile technologies and geographic information system data sets of every house, village and health facility in the country. We piloted the system in 184 health facilities across five provinces between 2015 and 2016. By the end of 2020, the system's mobile tablets were rolled out to 473 facilities in 13 provinces, while the online platform was available in health authorities of all 22 provinces, including church health services. Fractured data siloes of legacy health programmes have been integrated and a platform for civil registration systems established. We discuss how mobile technologies and geographic information systems have transformed health information systems in Papua New Guinea over the past 6 years by increasing the timeliness, completeness, quality, accessibility, flexibility, acceptability and utility of national health data. To achieve this transformation, we highlight the importance of considering the benefits of mobile tools and using rich geographic information systems data sets for health workers in primary care in addition to the needs of public health authorities.


Subject(s)
Geographic Information Systems/organization & administration , Health Information Systems/organization & administration , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Wireless Technology/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Collection , Government Programs , Health Information Systems/economics , Humans , Papua New Guinea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Biomed Inform ; 117: 103770, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163987

ABSTRACT

Health information exchange (HIE) has mostly emerged as centralized data hubs that can pass data requests from one subscribing healthcare institution to another. Using traditional health information systems (HISs) with different technologies in hospitals leads to usability and incompatibility issues because of islands of information. This paper discusses shifting from HIE into an integrated universal health information infrastructure. Migration to such integrated universal electronic health records architecture could support real-time HIE and advanced modern big data analytics. However, there are various standards and technologies to facilitate HIS integration, a significant amount of efforts is still needed.


Subject(s)
Health Information Exchange , Health Information Systems , Computer Systems , Electronic Health Records , Hospitals
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