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1.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 150(1): 221e-226e, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1853301

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: In the wake of the recent coronavirus disease of 2019 public health emergency, care delivery by means of telemedicine using audiovisual virtual platforms has become an important tool for patient communication. There are many logistic, medicolegal, and practical aspects of telemedicine that should be considered by the practicing plastic surgeon. Successful virtual patient interactions require an understanding of medical licensure requirements to perform telemedicine visits in a certain region. In addition, it is imperative to be familiar with specific liability and malpractice concerns, in addition to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations before conducting electronic visits. During consultations, providers should be aware of proper physician conduct and the potential role of chaperones. Furthermore, appropriate visit documentation, in addition to telemedicine billing and coding, has to be ensured. Lastly, plastic surgeons should adhere to the rules of controlled substance prescription by means of telemedicine platforms. This article describes these salient topics surrounding telemedicine visits that are faced by plastic surgeons and discusses strategies to optimize and ensure safe use of virtual platforms.


Subject(s)
Surgeons , Surgery, Plastic , Telemedicine , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Health Policy , Humans , United States
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 6967166, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476881

ABSTRACT

Health big data has already been the most important big data for its serious privacy disclosure concerns and huge potential value of secondary use. Measurements must be taken to balance and compromise both the two serious challenges. One holistic solution or strategy is regarded as the preferred direction, by which the risk of reidentification from records should be kept as low as possible and data be shared with the principle of minimum necessary. In this article, we present a comprehensive review about privacy protection of health data from four aspects: health data, related regulations, three strategies for data sharing, and three types of methods with progressive levels. Finally, we summarize this review and identify future research directions.


Subject(s)
Confidentiality , Health Records, Personal , Privacy , Consumer Health Information , Genomics , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , Information Dissemination , Models, Theoretical , United States
3.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 29(4): 609-618, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443051

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In response to COVID-19, the informatics community united to aggregate as much clinical data as possible to characterize this new disease and reduce its impact through collaborative analytics. The National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C) is now the largest publicly available HIPAA limited dataset in US history with over 6.4 million patients and is a testament to a partnership of over 100 organizations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We developed a pipeline for ingesting, harmonizing, and centralizing data from 56 contributing data partners using 4 federated Common Data Models. N3C data quality (DQ) review involves both automated and manual procedures. In the process, several DQ heuristics were discovered in our centralized context, both within the pipeline and during downstream project-based analysis. Feedback to the sites led to many local and centralized DQ improvements. RESULTS: Beyond well-recognized DQ findings, we discovered 15 heuristics relating to source Common Data Model conformance, demographics, COVID tests, conditions, encounters, measurements, observations, coding completeness, and fitness for use. Of 56 sites, 37 sites (66%) demonstrated issues through these heuristics. These 37 sites demonstrated improvement after receiving feedback. DISCUSSION: We encountered site-to-site differences in DQ which would have been challenging to discover using federated checks alone. We have demonstrated that centralized DQ benchmarking reveals unique opportunities for DQ improvement that will support improved research analytics locally and in aggregate. CONCLUSION: By combining rapid, continual assessment of DQ with a large volume of multisite data, it is possible to support more nuanced scientific questions with the scale and rigor that they require.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Data Accuracy , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , United States
4.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(5): 250-254, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354348

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To review current literature on texting as a sustainable intervention of case management in the outpatient setting. FINDINGS: Texting, as a case management intervention, provides the medically complex client with a pathway to achieve care plan goals. Texting increases adherence, communication, and self-management. It can increase client enrollment in disease management programs, while providing support, flexibility, convenience, cost savings, and increased participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: In current practice, such as management of the coronavirus (COVID-19), other pandemics, or natural/environmental disasters, texting is a solution-focused intervention that can deliver and retrieve real-time information to a medically complex population. It can link patients to resources and increase outreach, efficiency, quality, and coordination of care. Texting can promote adherence to appointments, increase medication compliance and disease management interventions, and provide motivational change messages. However, there are legal and regulatory concerns that carry potential consequences and implications that should be approached judiciously (Mellette, 2015). Texting is not one size fits all; it can cause HIPAA breeches, hinder communication with certain populations, confuse health messaging, and replace human communication, thereby reducing staffing in practice.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/standards , Case Management/standards , Communication , Guidelines as Topic , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/standards , Telemedicine/standards , Text Messaging/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
6.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 29(4): 271-276, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246812

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In the setting of the COVID-19 global pandemic, the demand for and use of telemedicine has surged in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. This review aims to objectively review and summarize the existing evidence for the use of telemedicine within facial plastic surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: Telemedicine has been successfully implemented among subsets of facial plastic surgery patients, with high patient and provider satisfaction. Although the technology to facilitate telemedicine exists and preliminary studies demonstrate promise, multiple technological, financial, and medical barriers may persist in the postpandemic era. SUMMARY: Telemedicine will likely continue to grow and expand within facial plastic surgery moving forward, and we should continue to critically evaluate patient selection, access to care, and strategies for effective implementation to enhance current clinical practices.


Subject(s)
Face/surgery , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Facial Injuries/diagnostic imaging , Facial Injuries/surgery , Facial Paralysis/classification , Facial Paralysis/diagnosis , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , Patient Participation , Patient Satisfaction , Surgery, Plastic/education , Teleradiology , United States , Videoconferencing
7.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 279: 70-77, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on health service delivery, the US Office for Civil Rights (OCR) updated the policies on health data processing, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated discourses on HIPAA in relation to COVID-19. METHODS: Through a search of media sources in the Factiva database, relevant texts were identified. We applied a text mining approach to identify concepts and themes in these texts. RESULTS: Our analysis revealed six central themes, namely, Health, HIPAA, Privacy, Security, Patients, and Need, as well as their associated concepts. Among these, Health was the most frequently discussed theme. It comprised concepts such as public, care, emergency, providers, telehealth, entity, use, discretion, OCR, Health and Human Services (HHS), enforcement, business, and services. CONCLUSION: Our discourse analysis of media outlets highlights the role of health data privacy law in the response to global public health emergencies and demonstrates how discourse analysis and computational methods can inform health data protection policymaking in the digital health era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Confidentiality , Humans , Pandemics , Privacy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
8.
Clin Obstet Gynecol ; 64(2): 392-397, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203758

ABSTRACT

While telemedicine had been utilized in varying ways over the last several years, it has dramatically accelerated in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article we describe the privacy issues, in relation to the barriers to care for health care providers and barriers to the obstetric patient, licensing and payments for telehealth services, technological issues and language barriers. While there may be barriers to the use of telehealth services this type of care is feasible and the barriers are surmountable.


Subject(s)
Communication Barriers , Health Services Accessibility , Obstetrics , Privacy , Telemedicine , Female , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Health Services Accessibility/ethics , Health Services Accessibility/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Internet , Licensure , Obstetrics/ethics , Obstetrics/legislation & jurisprudence , Obstetrics/methods , Obstetrics/organization & administration , Pregnancy , Privacy/legislation & jurisprudence , Technology , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States
10.
Perspect Health Inf Manag ; 18(Winter): 1l, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103043

ABSTRACT

The notion of health information privacy has evolved over time as the healthcare industry has embraced technology. Where once individuals were concerned about the privacy of their conversations and financial information, the digitization of health data has created new challenges for those responsible for ensuring that patient information remains secure and private. Coupled with the lack of updated, overarching legislation, a critical gap exists between advancements in technology, consumer informatics tools and privacy regulations. Almost twenty years after the HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliance date, the healthcare industry continues to seek solutions to privacy challenges absent formal contemporary law. Since HIPAA, a few attempts have been made to control specific aspects of health information including genetic information and use of technology however none were visionary enough to address issues seen in today's digital data focused healthcare environment. The proliferation of digital health data, trends in data use, increased use of telehealth applications due to COVID-19 pandemic and the consumer's participatory role in healthcare all create new challenges not covered by the existing legal framework. Modern efforts to address this dilemma have emerged in state and international law though the United States healthcare industry continues to operate under a law written two decades ago. As technology continues to advance at a rapid pace along with consumers playing a greater role in the management of their healthcare through digital health the privacy guidance provided by federal law must also shift to reflect the new reality.


Subject(s)
Confidentiality/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , COVID-19 , Genome , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
J World Fed Orthod ; 10(1): 9-13, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101206

ABSTRACT

Recent advances in technology, growing patient demand, and the need for social distancing due to Coronavirus Disease 2019 has expedited adoption of teledentistry in orthodontics as a means of consulting and monitoring a patient without an in-office visit. However, a lack of computer literacy and knowledge of software choices, and concerns regarding patient safety and potential infringement of regulations can make venturing into this new technology intimidating. In this article, various types of teledentistry systems for orthodontic practices, implementation guidelines, and important regulatory considerations on the use of teledentistry for orthodontic purposes are discussed. A thorough evaluation of the intended use of the software should precede commitment to a service. Selected service should be Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant at minimum and a Business Associate Agreement should be in place for protection of privacy. Ensuring the compatibility of the designated clinic computer with the system's requirements and installation of all safeguards must follow. Appointments should be documented in the same manner as in-office visits and teledentistry patients must be located within the clinician's statutory license boundary. Informed consent forms should include teledentistry or a supplemental teledentistry consent form should be used. Malpractice insurance covers everything usual and customary under the provider's license but the need for cyber liability insurance increases with teledentistry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Orthodontics , Telemedicine/methods , Artificial Intelligence , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Privacy/legislation & jurisprudence , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
14.
Am J Manag Care ; 26(10 Spec No.): SP330-SP332, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006072

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe onboarding and utilization of telemedicine across a large statewide community oncology practice and to evaluate trends, barriers, and opportunities in care delivery during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: We describe telemedicine onboarding and utilization across a statewide oncology practice, covering 221 sites of service and more than 650 practitioners. We describe qualitatively the onboarding process of a diverse set of administrative, technical, and clinical partners. We describe quantitatively utilization throughout the practice. We describe a survey conducted to enlighten barriers and opportunities for optimal utilization. RESULTS: Multistakeholder education was directed to clinical teams, administrative and technical support staff, and patients through webinars and team meetings. Utilization was high from April through October 2020, representing 15% to 20% of new-patient visits and 20% to 25% of established-patient visits. In a survey offered to all clinicians, 96% of respondents indicated they are using telemedicine, with 33% using it for more than 25% of patient encounters. Among respondents, 59% reported that the use of telemedicine helps expedite diagnosis and treatment more than seeing patients in person in the clinic, 55% of respondents managed urgent issues by telemedicine, 80% believed that patients benefited From urgent assessment by telemedicine, and 57% believed an emergency department visit or a hospitalization was avoided because of a telemedicine visit. Most clinicians reported that patients enjoy benefits of telemedicine because of decreased exposure risk, decreased transportation requirements, and ease of including caregivers in the visit with the treating clinician. The most common barriers to patients accessing telemedicine were technical challenges and broadband access. Despite this, less than 5% of respondents routinely use telephone-only communication, as most typically use bimodal audio/video communication. Many clinicians have expansion ideas on how telemedicine can further expand the longitudinal care delivery for our patient population. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine can be implemented successfully across a large statewide oncology practice and service a high volume of patients. Clinicians utilize telemedicine for new and established patients with minimal dysfunction. Clinicians believe patients benefit From telemedicine For new, established, and urgent care visits. Broadband access functionality should be explored to optimally serve our patient population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/standards , Humans , Inservice Training , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States
15.
Fertil Steril ; 114(6): 1126-1128, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959775

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine had been very slowly making inroads into standard clinical practice. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the rapid implementation of telemedicine across most practices. The efficiency and permanence of telemedicine services depends on a multitude of factors including technologic choices, governmental and insurance regulations, reimbursement policies, and staff and patient education and acceptance. Although challenges remain and the extent of implementation is still evolving, it is clear that telemedicine is here to stay and that all those involved in health care need to be familiar with its opportunities and challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Reproductive Medicine , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Humans , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement/legislation & jurisprudence , Office Visits/economics , Office Visits/trends , Patient Education as Topic , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Reproductive Medicine/instrumentation , Reproductive Medicine/methods , Reproductive Medicine/trends , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , United States
16.
J Pediatr Rehabil Med ; 13(3): 389-392, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916437

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus, the cause of COVID-19, has sent shockwaves throughout the world, shuttered many businesses essentially overnight, and has left billions living worldwide in quarantine. Not surprisingly, the health care industry has been significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This article focuses on how COVID-19 has influenced the Office for Civil Rights' (OCR's) enforcement of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy and Security Rules as they relate to telehealth remote communications, and opines about whether the COVID-19-related changes to HIPAA Privacy Rule and Security Rule enforcement might last beyond the current crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Civil Rights/trends , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/organization & administration , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Communication , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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