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1.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 119(29-30): 504-505, 2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198561
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e26102, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191016

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Healthcare workers (HWs) perform a critical role not only in the clinical management of patients but also in providing adequate infection control and prevention measures and waste management procedures to be implemented in healthcare facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness and knowledge of COVID-19 infection control precautions and waste management procedures among HWs in Saudi Arabian hospitals.This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Information on knowledge, awareness, and practice of infection control and waste management procedures were obtained from the HWs using a structured questionnaire. A thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.Our findings indicated that most of the study participants were knowledgeable, with a mean score of 78.3%. In total, 92.5%, 90.3%, and 91.7% of the participants were aware of the infection control precautions, COVID-19 waste management procedures, the availability of infection control supplies, respectively. HWs' Knowledge regarding waste management and infection control procedures correlated significantly with sex (P ≤ .001 and <.001), education (P = .024 and .043), and working experience (P = .029 and .009), respectively.Most participants appreciated the importance of their role in infection control, surveillance, and monitoring of the ongoing safety practices in their patients as well as their facilities and communities.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infection Control/standards , Medical Waste Disposal/standards , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities/standards , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
3.
J Bras Pneumol ; 48(5): e20220018, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2156225

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and practices among health care workers (HCWs) practicing in Latin American countries during the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a multinational cross-sectional survey study, using an online self-administered questionnaire. The final version of the questionnaire comprised 40 questions, organized in five sections: demographic and professional characteristics; COVID-19 knowledge; attitudes toward COVID-19; COVID-19 practices; and institutional resources. RESULTS: The study involved 251 HCWs from 19 Latin American countries who agreed to participate. In our sample, 77% of HCWs participated in some sort of institutional training on COVID-19, and 43% had a low COVID-19 knowledge score. COVID-19 knowledge was associated with the type of health center (public/private), availability of institutional training, and sources of information about COVID-19. Concerns about not providing adequate care were reported by 60% of the participants. The most commonly used ventilatory strategies were protective mechanical ventilation, alveolar recruitment maneuvers, and prone positioning, and the use of drugs to treat COVID-19 was mainly based on institutional protocols. CONCLUSIONS: In this multinational study in Latin America, almost half of HCWs had a low COVID-19 knowledge score, and the level of knowledge was associated with the type of institution, participation in institutional training, and information sources. HCWs considered that COVID-19 was very relevant, and more than half were concerned about not providing adequate care to patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Latin America/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine hesitancy decreases adult vaccination coverage and has been recognized by WHO as a major health threat. Primary care physicians (PCP) play a key role in vaccination by giving vaccine counselling to their patients. The aim of this systematic review is to identify the knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and barriers (KBAB) associated with own vaccination and patient recommendation in primary care physicians. METHODS: MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were used to search and identify relevant studies based on their title and abstract. In the next step, the full text of each previously selected article was read for eligibility. Articles were selected by two independent reviewers and data extraction was performed using tables. The following information was extracted: methodological characteristics, demographic factors, professional characteristics, and intrinsic or extrinsic factors influencing vaccination or recommendation. RESULTS: Our search yielded 41 eligible papers, data-sources, previous practices, belief in the effectiveness or safety of the vaccine, perceived risk, and trust in health authorities were all shown to be related to own vaccination and patient recommendation. CONCLUSION: Internet is the main source of information for PCP related to vaccine hesitancy. It is therefore essential to increase the presence and access to pro-vaccination content in this area. In addition, involving PCP in the establishment of vaccination recommendations could improve their credibility in the institutions. On the other hand, training in communication skills and establishing reminder systems could reflect higher vaccination coverage among their patients.


Subject(s)
Physicians, Primary Care , Vaccines , Adult , Humans , Vaccination , Trust , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
6.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277748, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140660

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite its benefits, HPV vaccine uptake has been historically lower than other recommended adolescent vaccines in the United States (US). While hesitancy and misinformation have threatened vaccinations for many years, the adverse impacts from COVID-19 pandemic on preventive services have been far-reaching. OBJECTIVES: To explore the perceptions and experiences of adolescent healthcare providers regarding routine vaccination services during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODOLOGY: Between December 2020 and May 2021, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted via Zoom video conferencing among a purposively selected, diverse group of adolescent healthcare providers (n = 16) within 5 healthcare practices in the US southeastern states of Georgia and Tennessee. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a rapid qualitative analysis framework. Our analysis was guided by the grounded theory and inductive approach. RESULTS: Participants reported that patient-provider communications; effective use of presumptive languaging; provider's continuing education/training; periodic reminders/recall messages; provider's personal conviction on vaccine safety/efficacy; early initiation of HPV vaccination series at 9 years; community partnerships with community health navigators/vaccine champions/vaccine advocates; use of standardized forms/prewritten scripts/standard operating protocols for patient-provider interactions; and vaccine promotion through social media, brochures/posters/pamphlets as well as outreaches to schools and churches served as facilitators to adolescent HPV vaccine uptake. Preventive adolescent services were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic at all practices. Participants highlighted an initial decrease in patients due to the pandemic, while some practices avoided the distribution of vaccine informational materials due to sanitary concerns. CONCLUSION: As part of a larger study, we provided contextual information to refine an intervention package currently being developed to improve adolescent preventive care provision in healthcare practices. Our results could inform the implementation of comprehensive intervention strategies that improve HPV vaccination rates. Additionally, lessons learned (e.g. optimizing patient- provider interactions) could be adopted to expand COVID-19 vaccine acceptance on a sizable scale.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Humans , Adolescent , United States , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Georgia/epidemiology , Tennessee/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Vaccination , Health Personnel , Qualitative Research
7.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0274526, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140527

ABSTRACT

Several messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and inactivated COVID-19 vaccines are available to the global population as of 2022. The acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine will play a key role in combating the worldwide pandemic. Public confidence in this vaccine is largely based on its safety and effectiveness. This study was designed to provide independent evidence of the adverse effects associated with COVID-19 vaccines among healthcare workers in Iraq and to identify the attitudes of healthcare workers who rejected the vaccination. We conducted a cross-sectional study to collect data on the adverse effects of the Pfizer, AstraZeneca, and Sinopharm vaccines. Data were collected between October 2021 and February 2022. A total of 2,202 participants were enrolled in the study: (89.97%) received injections of the COVID-19 vaccines and (10.03%) were hesitant to receive the vaccination. Participants received either the Pfizer vaccine (62.9%), AstraZeneca vaccine (23.5%) or Sinopharm vaccine (13.6%). Most adverse effects were significantly less prevalent in the second dose than in the first dose. Notably, the adverse effects associated with the Pfizer vaccine were significantly more prevalent in females than in males. Following the first dose, the participants experienced more adverse effects with the AstraZeneca vaccine. Following the second dose, more adverse effects were associated with the Pfizer vaccine. Interestingly, the prevalence of COVID-19 infection in participants who received two doses of the Pfizer vaccine was significantly reduced compared to those who received two doses of either the AstraZeneca or Sinopharm vaccines. According to vaccine-hesitated participants, insufficient knowledge (29.9%), expeditious development (27.6%) and lack of trust in the vaccines (27.1%) were the three major reasons for refusing the vaccines. The results of our study indicated that these adverse effects do not present a significant problem and should not prevent successful control of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccines , Female , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Iraq/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/adverse effects
8.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0265797, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140379

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals working at the frontline, dealing with COVID-19 patients or their samples, should know about variants of concern (VOCs) and their transmissibility, disease severity, and vaccine efficacy. Healthcare professionals' (HCPs) perceptions towards new VOCs affect their practice and attitudes towards their patients. Moreover, these perceptions might significantly impact their patients' perceptions of new COVID-19 variants and public vaccine acceptability. METHODS: Online and paper-based questionnaires were distributed among Healthcare professionals in Jordan between August 2021 and October 2021. RESULTS: Among 423 HCPs who participated in this study, a majority believe that when viruses mutate, they become more transmissible (77.8%), more deadly (61.7%), and pathogenic (64.8%). In addition, half of the respondents, perceived current treatments as partially effective against VOCs and current diagnostics to be efficient. However, all VOCs were perceived as more transmissible, more virulent, and related to higher mortality rates when compared to the original strain. Regarding immunity against VOCs, (57.4%) of respondents believe in partial immunity against re-infection, and most respondents were either unsure about the current vaccines' efficacy or agreed that available vaccines would be ineffective. However, respondents (44.4%) still believe that people previously infected should get vaccinated. Respondents referred to the Ministry of Health as the most reliable source of information (45.6%) and the party responsible for educating the public about COVID-19 VOCs (57.9%). Travel was not a source of worry among respondents. However, they were worried about their families getting the new COVID-19 VOCs from their work. Similar proportions agreed/disagreed on the efficacy of the precautions and infection control measures currently applied by the government for preventing the spread of the new COVID-19 VOCs. CONCLUSION: Campaigns, workshops, and webinars targeting vaccines are highly recommended among HCPs to increase public acceptance of the vaccine and further booster shots.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Perception
9.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1949, 2022 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139209

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Protective vaccinations are important in maintaining health and reducing suffering from infectious diseases. Also, vaccine-preventable infectious diseases are associated with the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. AIM: The study aimed to test adults' knowledge of the role of protective vaccinations in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, and their opinions on the quantity of the information provided by doctors in this regard. METHODS: A total of 700 adults participated in the study, most of whom were women (500; 71.43%). The study used an original questionnaire containing questions covering vaccinations and cardiovascular diseases, and the general characteristics of the participants. The inclusion criteria for the study were 18 years of age and written informed consent to participate in the study. RESULTS: Over 60% of the participants did not know of, or denied the possibility of, developing cardiovascular diseases as a result of avoiding required preventive vaccinations. More than half of the participants stated that there is no need to recommend influenza vaccination to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Over 70% of participants stated that family doctors did not provide sufficient information about protective vaccinations. CONCLUSION: In these adults, knowledge of the role of preventive vaccinations in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases was low, and the quantity of the information provided by doctors about preventive vaccinations were considered to be insufficient. Public awareness of the effects of avoiding preventive vaccinations should be raised especially among people with CVD.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Communicable Diseases , Vaccines , Adult , Humans , Female , Male , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Vaccination
10.
BMC Pediatr ; 22(1): 610, 2022 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139192

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Childhood immunization has been globally recognized as the single most effective strategy in preventing childhood diseases and mortality. The perceptions of healthcare workers are important as their behavior and attitudes influence parental decision-making process. This research aimed to explore the factors that influence healthcare workers' experience and perceptions about delivering childhood immunization in Fiji. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted in three randomly selected health centers in Suva, Fiji from March 1st to April 5th, 2021. Five focus group discussions were conducted with healthcare workers who were chosen purposively, had worked in the health center for at least 6 months and included either gender. Those that did not consent or did not meet the inclusion criteria were excluded. The interviews were guided by semi-structured open-ended questionnaire and were recorded into a digital voice recorder. The data were coded, sorted, and then categorized into themes, and transcribed onto Microsoft Word. Thematic analysis was utilized to sort the key phrases from the recorded interviews. RESULTS: There were a total of 22 participants for the focus group discussions, with their ages ranging from 25 to 51 years, included 3 medical officers, 1 nurse practitioner and 18 registered nurses. Three major themes emerged, which included: healthcare worker factors, parental factors and health system factors. Subthemes identified from the healthcare worker factors were worker knowledge and attitudes. The subtheme for parental factors that emerged were defaulters, parental attitudes, perceived behavior and religious beliefs. For health system factors the subthemes were service delivery, registration, infrastructure, staff turnover, staff training and changes to the immunization schedule. CONCLUSION: Some of the perceived barriers reported by the healthcare workers were parental religious beliefs, parental knowledge and attitude, social or physical factors (finances, transportation, childcare and work conflicts), access to health services, immunization services and policies, hours of operation, waiting time and missed opportunities. Health workers acknowledged that they have an important role to play in immunization as they are the source of information and motivation for parents. Further studies are needed to be conducted nationally to determine the perceptions of healthcare workers towards immunization and how the services can be improved on a national level.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Child , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Fiji , Qualitative Research , Immunization
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e064301, 2022 11 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137765

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to first assess the knowledge and perception of first-year university students in Iraq about COVID-19 in general and SARS-CoV-2 latest variant of concern, and to evaluate the attitudes towards protection measures including vaccination. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted among newly enrolled students at the American University of Iraq-Baghdad. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to test an association between the outcomes measured on a 5-point Likert scale and the binary and the categorical independent variables, respectively. χ2 test was used to test the association between nominal categorical variables, while Kendall's τ-b was used for ordinal variables. PARTICIPANTS: Students (n=432) were invited to fill out a survey specifically tailored to assess their knowledge, perception and attitude towards Omicron variant and COVID-19 vaccines acceptance. 363 students enrolled in various majors participated in this study. RESULTS: Assessment of COVID-19 knowledge and perception revealed that students still lack reliable info and data about FDA-approved treatment options (70.5%), SARS-CoV-2 variants (96.5%) and approved vaccines. Students' attitude and practices towards recommended safety measures should be reassessed to better manage the pandemic. Adherence level was shown to be associated with the belief in its capacity to effectively manage the new variant. Interestingly, 85% of the students have received at least one dose of approved vaccine. A significant positive correlation was detected between the level of adherence to recommended precautions and the intention to take a third booster shot if proven effective. CONCLUSIONS: Students' reliable knowledge about COVID-19 pandemic including the various strains and approved vaccines should be improved to better manage the pandemic and set foundations for a more appropriate approach when another pandemic occurs. Special workshops should be organised to ensure that students and the public have a more trusted source of information about COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , United States , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Iraq , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Students , Perception
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e061803, 2022 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137722

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand the knowledge, attitude and behaviour of general practitioners (GPs) towards COVID-19 and to provide evidence for improved prevention and control measures against the pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1018 GPs in Shanghai from 21 February to 2 March 2020 using the WeChat platform. METHODS: Stratified random cluster sampling was performed according to the regional division of urban, urban-rural fringe and rural areas. This study used a self-designed mobile questionnaire. The questionnaire collected information on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours regarding COVID-19 prevention and control. RESULTS: A total of 989 questionnaires were declared valid. The average scores of GPs' knowledge, attitude and behaviour towards COVID-19 were 6.14±1.42 (range 0-10), 13.59±4.42 (range 0-25) and 7.82±1.53 (range 0-10), respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the knowledge score of male GPs was lower than that of female GPs (p=0.002). In addition, the 'attitude' score of female GPs was higher than that of male GPs (p=0.004). The 'behaviour' score of GPs in urban areas was lower than that of GPs in urban-rural fringe areas (p<0.001). The higher the knowledge score, the higher the behavioural score was observed to be (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The scores of knowledge, attitude and behaviour of Shanghai GPs towards COVID-19 were limited at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak. As a hopeful measure, the early implementation of proper training programmes for GPs in times of crisis will contribute to disease control and prevention. Lessons learnt from the current pandemic will hopefully help GPs handle similar future challenges and potential novel pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Male , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , China/epidemiology
13.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e058028, 2022 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Since introduction of the programme in April 2021, COVID-19 vaccine uptake has been low at less than 20%. This study explored community members' and health workers' perspectives on the COVID-19 vaccine uptake and its influencing factors in Zambia. STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative study employing focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs). STUDY SETTING: Sixteen primary healthcare facilities selected from Lusaka, Copperbelt, Central and Southern provinces. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 32 FGDs comprising local community members and 30 IDIs including health workers, traditional, religious and civic leaders (n=272). FGDs were separated based on age (youth and adults), sex (male and female) and place of residence (urban and rural). RESULTS: Both FGD and IDI participants agreed that vaccine uptake was low. Limited knowledge, access to information, myths and misconceptions, negative attitude, low-risk perception and supply in remote areas affected vaccine uptake. Overall, FGD participants expressed limited knowledge about the COVID-19 vaccine compared with health workers. Further, FGD participants from urban sites were more aware about the vaccine than those from rural areas. Health workers perceived the vaccine to be beneficial; the benefits included prevention of infection and limiting the severity of the disease. Moreover, FGD participants from urban sites expressed a negative attitude towards the vaccine. They believed the vaccine conferred no benefits. By contrast, participants from rural communities had mixed views; they needed more information about the vaccine benefits. Participants' attitude seems to have been influenced by personal or family experience with the COVID-19 disease or vaccination; those who had experienced the disease had a more positive attitude. In contrast, most young people believed they were not at risk of the COVID-19 disease. Misinformation from social media influenced their attitude. CONCLUSION: These results provide starting points for future policies and interventions for increasing COVID-19 vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , Adolescent , Male , Female , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Zambia , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
16.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 47(10): 1435-1443, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145242

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), vaccine is an important way to build and improve the immune barrier of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the population. The purpose of this study is to understand the current situation of knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation among Chinese college students during the epidemic of COVID-19, and analyze the influencing factors. METHODS: Using the convenient sampling method, we selected the college students from a comprehensive university in Hunan Province in May 2021 and designed KAP questionnaire about SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation for offline and online survey to analyze the current situation of college students' KAP of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation and the influenting factors. RESULTS: The total score of KAP of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation of Chinese college students was 43.72±5.60. The total score of knowledge was 16.28 ±3.09, and the score of each item was 3.26±0.62. The correct rate of the 5 questions in knowledge was 80.34%, 93.18%, 94.64%, 99.60% and 39.18%, respectively. The total score of attitude was 13.56±2.39, and the score of each item was 3.39±0.60. The total score of behavior was 13.88±2.51, and the score of each item was 3.47±0.63. The total scores of better health status, girls, and medical majors were relatively higher; those of medical majors, older students, and girls had higher scores on vaccination knowledge; those with better health and younger age had higher scores on attitude; those of better health status and girls had higher behavior scores (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: College students' KAP about SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation is generally high, but the knowledge level is relatively low. We should strengthen the propaganda and education for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation related knowledge, and strengthen the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine inoculation attitude and behavior of college students. Special attention should be paid to the education of vaccination knowledge for non-medical majors, younger, and male students, the guidance of vaccination attitude for those with poor health and older age, and encouragement of vaccination behavior for those with poor health and boys.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Students
17.
Front Public Health ; 10: 957721, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142321

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination among Health Care Workers is mandatory to lessen and curve the spread of transmission of COVID-19. Even though the Health Belief Model is one of the most widely used models for understanding vaccination behavior against COVID-19 disease, COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among Health Care Workers in Ethiopia was not adequately explored by using the Health Belief Model domains. Purpose: This study aimed to assess COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and associated factors among Health care workers in eastern, Ethiopia. Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study design was used among 417 health care workers selected by a systematic random sampling method from June 1- 30/2021. The data were collected by face-to-face interviews using semi-structured questionnaires and analyzed using STATA version 14 statistical software. Multivariable binary logistic regression analysis with a 95% confidence interval was carried out to identify factors associated with willingness to COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and a statistical significance was declared at a P-value < 0.05. Results: The willingness of health care workers to accept the COVID-19 vaccine was 35.6%. Age 30-39 (AOR = 4.16;95% CI: 2.51, 6.88), age ≥ 40 years (AOR = 3.29;95% CI: 1.47, 7.39), good attitude (AOR = 1.97; 95% CI: 1.00, 3.55), perceived susceptibility (AOR = 1.93; 95% CI: 1.12, 3.32), and perceived severity (AOR = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.10) were factors significantly associated with Health Care Workers acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine. Conclusion: The willingness to accept the COVID-19 vaccine among HCWs was low. Factors significantly associated with the willingness to accept the COVID-19 vaccine were age, good attitude, perceived susceptibility, and perceived severity of the disease. The low willingness of Health Care Workers to accept the COVID-19 vaccine was alarming and it needs more emphasis from the government in collaboration with other stakeholders to provide reliable information to avert misconceptions and rumors about the vaccine to improve the vaccine status of Health Care Workers to protect the communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Humans , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Health Belief Model , Hospitals, Public
18.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e24756, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141295

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a highly transmissible illness caused by SARS-CoV-2. The disease has affected more than 200 countries, and the measures that have been implemented to combat its spread, as there is still no vaccine or definitive medication, have been based on supportive interventions and drug repositioning. Brazil, the largest country in South America, has had more than 140,000 recorded deaths and is one of the most affected countries. Despite the extensive quantity of scientifically recognized information, there are still conflicting discussions on how best to face the disease and the virus, especially with regard to social distancing, preventive methods, and the use of medications. OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the Brazilian population's basic knowledge about COVID-19 to demonstrate how Brazilians are managing to identify scientifically proven information. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used. An original online questionnaire survey was administered from June 16 to August 21, 2020, across all five different geopolitical regions of the country (ie, the North, Northeast, Center-West, Southeast, and South). The questionnaire was comprised of questions about basic aspects of COVID-19, such as the related symptoms, conduct that should be followed when suspected of infection, risk groups, prevention, transmission, and social distancing. The wrong questionnaire response alternatives were taken from the fake news combat website of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. Participants (aged ≥18 years) were recruited through social networking platforms, including Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter. The mean distributions, frequencies, and similarities or dissimilarities between the responses for the different variables of the study were evaluated. The significance level for all statistical tests was less than .05. RESULTS: A total of 4180 valid responses representative of all the states and regions of Brazil were recorded. Most respondents had good knowledge about COVID-19, getting an average of 86.59% of the total score with regard to the basic aspects of the disease. The region, education level, age, sex, and social condition had a significant association (P<.001) with knowledge about the disease, which meant that women, the young, those with higher education levels, nonrecipients of social assistance, and more economically and socially developed regions had more correct answers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, Brazilians with social media access have a good level of basic knowledge about COVID-19 but with differences depending on the analyzed subgroup. Due to the limitation of the platform used in carrying out the study, care should be taken when generalizing the study findings to populations with less education or who are not used to accessing social networking platforms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Health Education/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Social Networking , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e24277, 2021 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With conflicting information about COVID-19, the general public may be uncertain about how to proceed in terms of precautionary behavior and decisions about whether to return to activity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to determine the factors associated with COVID-19-related concerns, precautionary behaviors, and willingness to return to activity. METHODS: National survey data were obtained from the Democracy Fund + UCLA Nationscape Project, an ongoing cross-sectional weekly survey. The sample was provided by Lucid, a web-based market research platform. Three outcomes were evaluated: (1) COVID-19-related concerns, (2) precautionary behaviors, and (3) willingness to return to activity. Key independent variables included age, gender, race or ethnicity, education, household income, political party support, religion, news consumption, number of medication prescriptions, perceived COVID-19 status, and timing of peak COVID-19 infections by state. RESULTS: The data included 125,508 responses from web-based surveys conducted over 20 consecutive weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic (comprising approximately 6250 adults per week), between March 19 and August 5, 2020, approved by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Institutional Review Board for analysis. A substantial number of participants were not willing to return to activity even after the restrictions were lifted. Weighted multivariate logistic regressions indicated the following groups had different outcomes (all P<.001): individuals aged ≥65 years (COVID-19-related concerns: OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.93-2.18; precautionary behaviors: OR 2.38, 95% CI 2.02-2.80; return to activity: OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.37-0.46 vs 18-40 years); men (COVID-19-related concerns: OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.70-0.75; precautionary behaviors: OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.67-0.81; return to activity: OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.88-2.12 vs women); taking ≥4 medications (COVID-19-related concerns: OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.40-1.54; precautionary behaviors: OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.20-1.555; return to activity: OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.69-0.81 vs <3 medications); Republicans (COVID-19-related concerns: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.38-0.42; precautionary behaviors: OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.40-0.50; return to activity: OR 2.22, 95% CI 2.09-2.36 vs Democrats); and adults who reported having COVID-19 (COVID-19-related concerns: OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.12-1.39; precautionary behaviors: OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.52-0.81; return to activity: OR 3.99, 95% CI 3.48-4.58 vs those who did not). CONCLUSIONS: Participants' age, party affiliation, and perceived COVID-19 status were strongly associated with their COVID-19-related concerns, precautionary behaviors, and willingness to return to activity. Future studies need to develop and test targeted messaging approaches and consider political partisanship to encourage preventative behaviors and willingness to return to activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Status , Politics , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(1): e22794, 2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2141286

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, a viral respiratory disease first reported in December 2019, quickly became a threat to global public health. Further understanding of the epidemiology of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the risk perception of the community may better inform targeted interventions to reduce the impact and spread of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to examine the association between chronic diseases and serious outcomes following COVID-19 infection, and to explore its influence on people's self-perception of risk for worse COVID-19 outcomes. METHODS: This study draws data from two databases: (1) the nationwide database of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in Portugal, extracted on April 28, 2020 (n=20,293); and (2) the community-based COVID-19 Barometer survey, which contains data on health status, perceptions, and behaviors during the first wave of COVID-19 (n=171,087). We assessed the association between relevant chronic diseases (ie, respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal diseases; diabetes; and cancer) and death and intensive care unit (ICU) admission following COVID-19 infection. We identified determinants of self-perception of risk for severe COVID-19 outcomes using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal diseases were associated with mortality and ICU admission among patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 infection (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.98; OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.80-6.40; and OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.66-3.06, respectively). Diabetes and cancer were associated with serious outcomes only when considering the full sample of COVID-19-infected cases in the country (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.64; and OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03-1.89, respectively). Older age and male sex were both associated with mortality and ICU admission. The perception of risk for severe COVID-19 disease in the study population was 23.9% (n=40,890). This was markedly higher for older adults (n=5235, 46.4%), those with at least one chronic disease (n=17,647, 51.6%), or those in both of these categories (n=3212, 67.7%). All included diseases were associated with self-perceptions of high risk in this population. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the association between some prevalent chronic diseases and increased risk of worse COVID-19 outcomes. It also brings forth a greater understanding of the community's risk perceptions of serious COVID-19 disease. Hence, this study may aid health authorities to better adapt measures to the real needs of the population and to identify vulnerable individuals requiring further education and awareness of preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Portugal/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
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