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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0260367, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793557

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The world is awash with claims about the effects of health interventions. Many of these claims are untrustworthy because the bases are unreliable. Acting on unreliable claims can lead to waste of resources and poor health outcomes. Yet, most people lack the necessary skills to appraise the reliability of health claims. The Informed Health Choices (IHC) project aims to equip young people in Ugandan lower secondary schools with skills to think critically about health claims and to make good health choices by developing and evaluating digital learning resources. To ensure that we create resources that are suitable for use in Uganda's secondary schools and can be scaled up if found effective, we conducted a context analysis. We aimed to better understand opportunities and barriers related to demand for the resources, how the learning content overlaps with existing curriculum and conditions in secondary schools for accessing and using digital resources, in order to inform resource development. METHODS: We used a mixed methods approach and collected both qualitative and quantitative data. We conducted document analyses, key informant interviews, focus group discussions, school visits, and a telephone survey regarding information communication and technology (ICT). We used a nominal group technique to obtain consensus on the appropriate number and length of IHC lessons that should be planned in a school term. We developed and used a framework from the objectives to code the transcripts and generated summaries of query reports in Atlas.ti version 7. FINDINGS: Critical thinking is a key competency in the lower secondary school curriculum. However, the curriculum does not explicitly make provision to teach critical thinking about health, despite a need acknowledged by curriculum developers, teachers and students. Exam oriented teaching and a lack of learning resources are additional important barriers to teaching critical thinking about health. School closures and the subsequent introduction of online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated teachers' use of digital equipment and learning resources for teaching. Although the government is committed to improving access to ICT in schools and teachers are open to using ICT, access to digital equipment, unreliable power and internet connections remain important hinderances to use of digital learning resources. CONCLUSIONS: There is a recognized need for learning resources to teach critical thinking about health in Ugandan lower secondary schools. Digital learning resources should be designed to be usable even in schools with limited access and equipment. Teacher training on use of ICT for teaching is needed.


Subject(s)
Health Behavior/physiology , Health Education/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Adolescent , Choice Behavior/physiology , Curriculum , Digital Technology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Information Dissemination/ethics , Information Dissemination/methods , Learning , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Schools/trends , Students , Thinking , Uganda/ethnology
2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264371, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging variants of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has claimed over 3000 lives in Nigeria and vaccination remains a means of reducing the death toll. Despite ongoing efforts by the government to ensure COVID-19 vaccination of most residents to attain herd immunity, myths and beliefs have adversely shaped the perception of most Nigerians, challenging the uptake of COVID-19 vaccine. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the awareness, perception, and willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccine among Nigerian adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional online nationwide study was conducted from April to June 2021 among Nigerian adult population using the snowballing method. Descriptive analysis was used to summarise the data. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify the predictors of COVID-19 uptake among the respondents. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: A total of 1058 completed forms were analysed and 63.9% were females. The mean age was 40.8 years±12.2 years. Most of the respondents (740; 69.5%) had satisfactory awareness of the vaccination exercise. The media was the main source of information. Health workers reported higher level of awareness (aOR = 1.822, 95% CI: 1.388-2.524, p<0.001). Respondents that are Christians and Muslims had better awareness compared to the unaffiliated (aOR = 6.398, 95% CI: 1.918-21.338, P = 0.003) and (aOR = 7.595, 95% CI: 2.280-25.301, p<0.001) respectively. There is average score for perception statements (566; 53.2%) towards COVID-19 vaccination. Close to half of the respondents (44.2%) found the short period of COVID-19 production worrisome. Majority of the respondents were willing to get the vaccine (856; 80.9%). Those without a prior diagnosis of COVID-19 had a lower willingness to get vaccinated (aOR = 0.210 (95% CI: 0.082-0.536) P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The study revealed a high level of awareness, willingness to receive the vaccine and moderate perception towards the vaccination activities. Influencing factors that significantly affects awareness were religion, occupation, education and prior diagnosis of COVID-19; for perception and willingness-occupation, and prior diagnosis of the COVID-19 were influencing factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , /psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination , /trends
3.
BMC Nephrol ; 23(1): 80, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused significant psychological distress globally. Our study assessed the prevalence of psychological distress and associated factors during COVID-19 pandemic among kidney transplant recipients and kidney donors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 497 participants (325 recipients and 172 donors) was conducted from 1st May to 30th June 2020 in Singapore. The survey questionnaire assessed knowledge levels of COVID-19, socio-demographic data, health status, psychosocial impact of COVID-19, and precautionary behaviors during the pandemic. Psychological distress was defined as having anxiety, depression, or stress measured by the validated Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. Linear regression analyses were used to assess factors associated with higher psychological distress. RESULTS: The prevalence of psychological distress was 14.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.5-17.6%) in the overall population; it was 12.8% (9.79-16.6%) in recipients and 13.4% (9.08-19.6%) in donors with no significant difference (P = 0.67). Younger age (21-49 vs. ≥50 years), unmarried status, non-Singapore citizen, worse health conditions, and worrying about physical and mental health were associated with higher psychological distress. Malays (versus Chinese), taking precautionary measures (hand sanitization), and receiving enough information about COVID-19 were associated with lower psychological distress. No interactions were observed between recipients and donors. CONCLUSIONS: At least one in ten recipients and donors suffer from psychological distress during COVID-19 pandemic. Focused health education to younger adults, unmarried individuals, non-Singapore citizens, and those with poor health status could potentially prevent psychological distress in recipients and donors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Tissue Donors/psychology , Transplant Recipients/psychology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anxiety/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/ethnology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/ethnology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Health Status , Humans , Kidney Transplantation , Malaysia/ethnology , Male , Marital Status , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261359, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Refugees are at increased risk for COVID-19 infection in part due to their living conditions, which make it harder to adopt and adhere to widely accepted preventive measures. Little empirical evidence exists about what refugees know about COVID-19 and what they do to prevent infection. This study explored what refugee women and their health care workers understand about COVID-19 prevention, the extent of their compliance to public health recommendations, and what influences the adoption of these measures. METHODS: In October 2020, we conducted 25 in-depth interviews with facility and community health care staff (n = 10) and refugee women attending antenatal and postnatal care services (n = 15) in Eastleigh, Nairobi. FINDINGS: While researchers found a high level of awareness about COVID-19 and related prevention and control measures among refugee women, various barriers affected compliance with such measures, due in part to poverty and in part to rampant misconceptions informed by religious beliefs and political narratives about the virus. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that Kenya's Ministry of Health needs to institute a concerted and continuous education program to bring refugee communities up to speed about COVID-19 and its prevention. In addition to disseminating information about the need to wear masks and repeatedly wash hands, supplies-masks, soap and access to water-need to be made available to poor refugee communities. Future research could explore which measures for disseminating factual information work best in refugee populations with different cultural norms and how best to target interventions to these groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Refugees/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/psychology , Public Health , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2021: 6650704, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416735

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ethnobotanical knowledge on four herbaceous species, Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass., Momordica charantia L., Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn., and Scoparia dulcis L., in Benin was investigated. METHODS: Herbal medicine traders in six different markets were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. The linear regression test was performed to check for the influence of respondent's age on ethnobotanical uses they hold. Relative frequency citation, fidelity level, use value, and Rahman similarity index were calculated to assess the diversity of medico-magic knowledge. The Informant Consensus Factor is not applicable in this study since we are dealing neither with the diversity of medicinal plants used by a community of people nor with a great number of plant species used for medicinal purposes, nor the diversity of plant species used in the treatment of a specific or group of ailments. RESULTS: The respondent's age did not influence the ethnobotanical uses they hold on the species. All thirty-six informants surveyed traded Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn., Momordica charantia L., and Scoparia dulcis L., and the majority traded Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. The respondent's age does not influence the diversity of ethnobotanical uses they hold on the study species. Purchase in traders' own markets was the predominant source of Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn., Momordica charantia L., and Scoparia dulcis L. while Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. was mostly purchased in other more distant markets. A noticeable proportion of traders also collect Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn. and Momordica charantia L. from wild populations. Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn. was the species most demanded by customers followed by Momordica charantia L. Traders confirmed the scarcity of all species in recent years and climate change and destruction of natural habitats for logging were the most cited causes. The entire plant of Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn. was used mainly to treat malaria, diabetes, and constipation, and decoction with oral administration was the most frequent preparation for malaria treatment. To treat diabetes, informants mixed Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn. with Momordica charantia L. used as a decoction with oral administration. Momordica charantia L. was also used to treat measles and chicken pox. Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. and Scoparia dulcis L. were mostly used for their spiritual use for luck, predominantly by chewing fresh leaves or flowers, and by bathing with the ground plant mixed with soap, respectively. Overall, Momordica charantia L. had the greatest use value followed by Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn. The majority of traders do not plant the species. CONCLUSIONS: The harvesting and trade of the species threaten their natural populations and urgent tools, including in situ and ex situ conservation, are needed to ensure their long-term sustainable exploitation.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Medicine, African Traditional , Plants, Medicinal , Asteraceae , Benin , Ethnobotany , Humans , Medicine, African Traditional/methods , Medicine, African Traditional/psychology , Momordica charantia , Phyllanthus , Scoparia
11.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0250981, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite it is easily preventable; malaria is still remains to be a major public health problem in globally as well as in Ethiopia. The disease can be easily prevented through individual and societal combined efforts by keeping the environment safe, effective utilization of long lasting Insecticide Nets and early treatment. However, the factors for poor knowledge and practices of malaria prevention is not well studied in Ethiopia; particularly, in the study area. Hence, this study aimed to provide concrete evidence towards malaria prevention practices and associated factors among Households of Hawassa City Administration, Southern Ethiopia, 2020. METHOD: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among a randomly selected 598 households at Hawassa City Administration from April 1-15, 2020. Multistage sampling technique was employed to recruit the study households. Data were collected by trained data collectors through a face-to-face interview with pretested structured questionnaire, which was adapted from previous peer reviewed articles. Then the data were checked for the completeness and consistencies, then, coded and entered into Epi data 3.1 and it was exported to SPSS IBM version 23 for analysis. Descriptive mean with standard deviation was used to summarize the continuous variables. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess factors affecting prevention and control of Malaria. Finally, adjusted odds ratio together with 95% CI and p-value <0.05 was used to declare the statistical significances. RESULTS: The overall 317 (54.3%) of households practiced good measure of malaria prevention and control measures. Urban residence [AOR = 1.95 (95%CI: 1.17-3.24)], Secondary school completed [AOR = 5.02(95%CI 2.24-12.03)], Tertiary school completed [AOR = 7.27(95%CI: 2.84-18.55)], Positive Attitude [AOR = 8.20(95%CI: 5.31-12.68)] and Good knowledge about malaria [AOR = 2.81(95%CI: 1.78-4.44)] were significantly associated with malaria prevention practices. CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of the households were still practiced poor measure of malaria prevention and control measures. Hence, health officials and stake holders need attention by providing continuous health education and follow up to control malaria.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Malaria/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Community-Based Participatory Research/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Malaria/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
Ann Fam Med ; 19(4): 293-301, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229027

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To explore public knowledge, understanding of public health recommendations, perceptions, and trust in information sources related to COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of central Pennsylvanian adults evaluated self-reported knowledge, and a convergent, mixed methods design was used to assess beliefs about recommendations, intended behaviors, perceptions, and concerns related to infectious disease risk, and trust of information sources. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 5,948 adults. The estimated probability of correct response for the basic knowledge score, weighted with confidence, was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.79-0.80). Knowledge was significantly higher in patients with higher education and nonminority race. While the majority of respondents reported that they believed following CDC recommendations would decrease the spread of COVID-19 in their community and intended to adhere to them, only 65.2% rated social isolation with the highest level of belief and adherence. The most trusted information source was federal public health websites (42.8%). Qualitative responses aligned with quantitative data and described concerns about illness, epidemiologic issues, economic and societal disruptions, and distrust of the executive branch's messaging. The survey was limited by a lack of minority representation, potential selection bias, and evolving COVID-19 information that may impact generalizability and interpretability. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about COVID-19 and intended adherence to behavioral recommendations were high. There was substantial distrust of the executive branch of the federal government, however, and concern about mixed messaging and information overload. These findings highlight the importance of consistent messaging from trusted sources that reaches diverse groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Information Seeking Behavior , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Federal Government , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Humans , Intention , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pennsylvania , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Trust
13.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251694, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225817

ABSTRACT

The main strategy for combatting SARS-CoV-2 infections in 2020 consisted of behavioural regulations including contact reduction, maintaining distance, hand hygiene, and mask wearing. COVID-19-related risk perception and knowledge may influence protective behaviour, and education could be an important determinant. The current study investigated differences by education level in risk perception, knowledge and protective behaviour regarding COVID-19 in Germany, exploring the development of the pandemic over time. The COVID-19 Snapshot Monitoring study is a repeated cross-sectional online survey conducted during the pandemic in Germany from 3 March 2020 (waves 1-28: 27,957 participants aged 18-74). Differences in risk perception, knowledge and protective behaviour according to education level (high versus low) were analysed using linear and logistic regression. Time trends were accounted for by interaction terms for education level and calendar week. Regarding protective behaviour, interaction terms were tested for all risk perception and knowledge variables with education level. The strongest associations with education level were evident for perceived and factual knowledge regarding COVID-19. Moreover, associations were found between low education level and higher perceived severity, and between low education level and lower perceived probability. Highly educated men were more worried about COVID-19 than those with low levels of education. No educational differences were observed for perceived susceptibility or fear. Higher compliance with hand washing was found in highly educated women, and higher compliance with maintaining distance was found in highly educated men. Regarding maintaining distance, the impact of perceived severity differed between education groups. In men, significant moderation effects of education level on the association between factual knowledge and all three protective behaviours were found. During the pandemic, risk perception and protective behaviour varied greatly over time. Overall, differences by education level were relatively small. For risk communication, reaching all population groups irrespective of education level is critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Risk Reduction Behavior , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Fear/psychology , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Hand Disinfection/trends , Hand Hygiene/methods , Hand Hygiene/trends , Health Risk Behaviors , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perception , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0246226, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225808

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is the largest viral pandemic of the 21st century. We aimed to study COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) among medical and health sciences students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). We performed a cross-sectional study between 2 June and 19 August 2020. The survey was distributed online using Survey Monkey. It was conducted in English and comprised two parts: socio-demographic characteristics, and KAP towards COVID-19. 712 responses to the questionnaire were collected. 90% of respondents (n = 695) were undergraduate students, while 10% (n = 81) were postgraduates. The majority (87%, n = 647) stated that they obtained COVID-19 information from multiple reliable sources. They were highly knowledgeable about the COVID-19 pandemic, but 76% (n = 539) did not recognize its routes of transmission. Medical students were significantly more knowledgeable compared with allied health students (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test) but there was no difference in knowledge between undergraduate and postgraduate students (P = 0.14, Mann Whitney U test). Medical students thought that more could be done to mitigate the COVID-19 situation compared with the allied health students (66.2% compared with 51.6%, p = 0.002 Fisher's Exact test). 63% (n = 431) were worried about getting COVID-19 infection, while 92% (n = 633)) were worried that a family member could be infected with the virus. 97% (n = 655) took precautions when accepting home deliveries, 94% (n = 637) had been washing their hands more frequently, and 95% (n = 643) had been wearing face masks. In conclusion, medical and health sciences students in the UAE showed high levels of knowledge and good attitudes and practices towards the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, they were worried about themselves or their family members becoming infected. Medical students had more knowledge about COVID-19 pandemic which was reflected in their opinion that more can be done to mitigate its effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical/methods , Female , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Universities
15.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249847, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 is a serious respiratory virus pandemic. Patient characteristics, knowledge of the COVID-19 disease, risk behaviour and mental state will differ between individuals. The primary aim of this study was to investigate these variables in patients visiting an emergency department in the Netherlands during the COVID-19 pandemic and to compare the "COVID-19 suspected" (positive and negative tested group) with the "COVID-19 not suspected" (control group) and to compare in the "COVID-19 suspected" group, the positive and negative tested patients. METHODS: Consecutive adult patients, visiting the emergency room at the Franciscus Gasthuis & Vlietland, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, were asked to fill out questionnaires on the abovementioned items on an iPad. The patients were either "COVID-19 suspected" (positive and negative tested group) or "COVID-19 not suspected" (control group). RESULTS: This study included a total of 159 patients, 33 (21%) tested positive, 85 (53%) negative and 41 (26%) were COVID-19 not suspected (control group). All patients in this study were generally aware of transmission risks and virulence and adhered to the non-pharmaceutical interventions. Working as a health care professional was correlated to a higher risk of SARS-Cov-2 infection (p- value 0.04). COVID-19 suspected patients had a significantly higher level of anxiety compared to COVID-19 not suspected patients (p-value < 0.001). The higher the anxiety, the more seriously hygiene measures were followed. The anxiety scores of the patients with (pulmonary) comorbidities were significantly higher than without comorbidities. CONCLUSION: This is one of the first (large) study that investigates and compares patient characteristics, knowledge, behaviour, illness perception, and mental state with respect to COVID-19 of patients visiting the emergency room, subdivided as being suspected of having COVID-19 (positive or negative tested) and a control group not suspected of having COVID-19. All patients in this study were generally aware of transmission risks and virulence and adhered to the non-pharmaceutical interventions. COVID-19 suspected patients and patients with (pulmonary) comorbidities were significantly more anxious. However, there is no mass hysteria regarding COVID-19. The higher the degree of fear, the more carefully hygiene measures were observed. Knowledge about the coping of the population during the COVID-19 pandemic is very important, certainly also in the perspective of a possible second outbreak of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Fear , Female , Health Personnel , Health Risk Behaviors/physiology , Humans , Male , Mental Health/trends , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Risk-Taking , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
16.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(3): 785-792, 2021 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153242

ABSTRACT

Widespread uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine is critical to halt the pandemic. At present, little is known about factors that will affect vaccine uptake, especially among diverse racial/ethnic communities that have experienced the highest burden of COVID. We administered an online survey to a Qualtrics respondent panel of women ages 27-45 years (N = 396) to assess vaccine intentions and attitudes, and trusted vaccine information sources. 56.8% intended to be vaccinated and 25.5% were unsure. In bivariate analyses, a greater percentage of non-Latina White (NLW) and Chinese women reported that they would be vaccinated, compared with Latina and non-Latina Black (NLB) women (p < 0.001). Those who were uninsured, unemployed and those with lower incomes were less likely to say that they would be vaccinated. In analyses stratified by race/ethnicity, NLB women remained significantly less likely to report that they would be vaccinated compared with NLW women (adjusted odds ratio: 0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.23, 0.94), controlling for age, marital status, income, education, employment, and insurance status. When analyses were additionally controlled for beliefs in vaccine safety and efficacy, racial/ethnic differences were no longer significant (adjusted odds ratio: 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 1.34). Given that NLB women were less likely to report the intention to be vaccinated, targeted efforts will be needed to promote vaccine uptake. It will be critical to emphasize that the vaccine is safe and effective; this message may be best delivered by trusted community members.


Subject(s)
African Americans/ethnology , Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Mass Vaccination/ethnology , /ethnology , Adult , Female , Humans , Intention , Middle Aged , United States/ethnology , Women
17.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world is grappling with an ever-changing COVID-19 pandemic using preventive measures such as personal hygiene, face masks, restrictions on travel and gatherings in communities, in addition to a race to find a vaccine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the western Uganda community on the proper use of face masks to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire was carried out from 1st July to 10th July 2020 among western Ugandans of consent age of 18 years and above. Data was analysed using Stata version 14.2. RESULTS: Among the respondents (n = 1114), the mean age was 30.7 (SD 11.1), 51% were males, 53.9% married and 43% had attained secondary education. Most participants (60.1%, n = 670) had satisfactory knowledge on the use of face masks and participants at a tertiary education level [AOR 2.6 (95% CI: 1.42-4.67; p = 0.002)] were likely to have satisfactory knowledge than participants who had not education. On attitude, most respondents (69.4%) were confident enough to correctly put on a face mask; 83.4% believed that a face mask can protect against COVID-19 and 75.9% of respondents had never shared their face mask. The majority of respondents (95.2%) agreed wearing face masks in public places was important to protect themselves against COVID-19; 60.3% reported washing their hands before wearing and after removing the face mask. Unfortunately, 51.5% reported removing the face mask if they needed to talk to someone. CONCLUSION: Despite the satisfactory knowledge, good attitude and practices, there is still much more to be done in terms of knowledge, attitude and practices among participants. Government, non-governmental organizations and civil society should improve sensitization of populations on how to behave with face masks while talking to avoid the spread of the COVID-19 among western Ugandans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Masks/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Masks/virology , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uganda/epidemiology
18.
J Cross Cult Gerontol ; 36(1): 1-19, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1074450

ABSTRACT

In this article, our goal is to provide researchers with a non-western perspective concerning the COVID-19 pandemic through a qualitative study of older adults living in Iwate, a prefecture in Japan that has only recently (27 July 2020) reported its first confirmed COVID-19 cases and which has experienced comparatively few cases since. Because they live in an environment with few COVID-19 cases, the individuals in this study provide an interesting perspective of the pandemic as it is unfolding in rural Japan and our focus here is on documenting the circumstances and ideas of elder residents of Iwate Prefecture to understand individual experiences of this population. Our intention here is to provide data and tentative analysis that may be useful in developing more complex cross-cultural studies related to the lived experience of COVID-19 among older people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Rural Population , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
19.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245176, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067408

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged and affected most of the world in early 2020. To inform effective public health measures we conducted a knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) survey among a Hausa Muslim society in Nigeria in March 2020. METHODS: The study is an analytic cross-sectional survey with questionnaires administered to the general population including Health Care Workers (HCW) in Kano, Nigeria. Participants were recruited by convenience sampling following informed consent. The percentage of KAP scores were categorized as good and poor. Independent predictors of good knowledge of COVID 19 were ascertained using a binary logistic regression model. RESULTS: The questionnaire was administered among urban 32.8%, peri-urban dwellers 32.4%, and to online participants 34.8%. The peri-urban and urban participants were given paper questionnaires. There were 886 study participants with mean age 28.58yrs [SD:10.25] (Interquartile range [IQR]:22yrs-32yrs), males 55.4% with 57.3% having had or were in tertiary education. Most participants were students 40% and civil servants 20%. The overall mean [standard deviation (SD)] for knowledge, attitude and practice scores expressed in percentage was 65.38%[SD15.90], 71.45% [SD14.10], and 65.04% [SD17.02] respectively. Out of the respondents, 270(30.47%) had good knowledge (GK), 158(17.8%) had good attitude (GA), and 230(25.96%) had good practice (GP) using cut-off scores of 75%, 86.5%, and 75% respectively. Over 48% did not agree COVID-19 originated from animals while 60% perceived the pandemic to be due to God's punishment. Also, 36% thought it was a man-made virus. When rating fear, most respondents [63.5%] had marked fear i.e. ≥ 7 out of 10 and 56% admitted to modifying their habits recently in fear of contracting the virus. As regards attitude to religious norms, 77.77% agreed on cancellation of the lesser pilgrimage as a measure to curb the spread of the disease while 23.64% admitted that greater pilgrimage (Hajj) should proceed despite the persistence of the ongoing pandemic. About 50% of the respondents insisted on attending Friday congregational prayers despite social distancing. One in four people still harbored stigma towards a person who has recovered from the virus. 28% felt some races are more at risk of the disease though 66% mentioned always practicing social distancing from persons coughing or sneezing. Almost 70% of respondents said they were willing to accept a vaccine with 39% saying they would be willing to pay for it if not publicly funded. In univariate analysis increasing age and having been ever married were associated with GK while tertiary education was associated with GA [Odds Ratio; 95% Confidence Interval] 2.66(1.79-3.95). Independent positive predictors of GK were those who were or had ever been married, those who had marked fear of COVID-19, and had modified their habits in the last three months. Those who had non-tertiary education and had the questionnaire administered as paper rather than online version had GK but age was not a predictor. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of transmission and preventive measures should be improved in the general population cognizant of cultural norms and Islamic practices. The study highlights the importance of considering belief systems and perception in developing control measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Islam/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 367-373, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999146

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined how the effects of the COVID-19 crisis has impacted young Hispanic fathers. DESIGN/SAMPLE: Using qualitative description, in-depth interviews were conducted among Hispanic fathers between the ages of 18 and 24 years, from community-based fatherhood program. The interviews of seven young Hispanic fathers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The participants' initial and ongoing fears about COVID-19 resulted from not having adequate information about the severity of the disease and how easily one can contract and transmit it to others. They also expressed concerns about the threat of the pandemic on their family's well-being, finances, and employment status. Providing for their families was their main priority, with some continuing to work, despite the risks of becoming infected with COVID-19. Despite their many hardships, fathers found strength in their families and remained hopeful in overcoming the challenges during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has presented difficulties and loss for many. Nurses in the community are well positioned to serve young Hispanic fathers to ensure their needs are met. A family-centered approach is ideal for young fathers to provide them equal opportunity to be actively involved in promoting health for themselves and their families during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Fathers/psychology , /psychology , Adolescent , Community Health Nursing , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Fathers/statistics & numerical data , Fear , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Hope , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , Qualitative Research , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
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