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1.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266276, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789183

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a growing interest in online information about coronavirus worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the digital health literacy (DHL) level, information-seeking behaviour, and satisfaction of information on COVID-19 among East and South-East Asia university students. This cross-sectional web-based study was conducted between April to June 2020 by recruiting students from universities in China, Malaysia, and the Philippines. University students who have Internet access were invited to participate in the study. Items on sociodemographic variables, DHL, information-seeking behaviour, and information satisfaction were included in the questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were conducted. A total of 5302 university students responded to the survey. The overall mean score across the four DHL subscales was 2.89 (SD: 0.42). Search engines (e.g., Google, Bing, Yahoo) (92.0%) and social media (88.4%) were highly utilized by the students, whereas Websites of doctors or health insurance companies were of lower utilization (64.7%). Across the domains (i.e., adding self-generated content, determining relevance, evaluating reliability, and protecting privacy) higher DHL was positively associated with higher usage of trustworthy resources. Providing online information on COVID-19 at official university websites and conducting health talks or web-based information dissemination about the strategies for mental health challenges during pandemic could be beneficial to the students. Strengthening DHL among university students will enhance their critical thinking and evaluation of online resources, which could direct them to the quality and trustworthy information sources on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785660

ABSTRACT

In the last few years, there has been an emphasis on the importance of health literacy (HL) and health education (HE) as basic tools to empower individuals and the community. The increasing interest in HL and HE has been observed through the evolution of publications and the nature of the main trends in the last few years. Knowing how HL and HE have evolved in scientific publications can help us to identify trends and set work priorities in this scope. Based on this, a bibliometric analysis (from 2000 to 2021) was conducted in two phases: first, an analysis was performed on the publications included in the Web of Science (WOS); second, a more specific analysis was conducted on the Core Collection from WOS. The data were analyzed with two software programs, the and Bibliometrix package for RStudio, and VOSviewer to analyze number of publications, citations, authors, collaborations, keywords trends, keywords evolutions and clusters of related terms. A total of 1799 articles were found in the first phase, and 727 in the second. The results from both analyses showed that the publications increased unequally until 2020, and considerably decreased in 2021; however, in spite of this, the number of citations remained constant. Likewise, five word clusters related with HL and HE were identified. D. Nutbeam stood out as the most prolific author on the subject, the USA as the country with the most publications, and the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health as having the most articles on the subject. This analysis may be a useful and helpful tool for future studies on the subject.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Bibliometrics , Health Education , Humans , Publications
3.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(4): e31459, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785265

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile devices have greatly facilitated the use of digital health resources, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mobile health (mHealth) has become a common and important way to monitor and improve health conditions for people from different social classes. The ability to utilize mHealth affects its effectiveness; therefore, the widespread application of mHealth technologies calls for an instrument that can accurately measure health literacy in the era of mobile media. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to (1) identify the components of mHealth literacy for ordinary users and (2) develop a systematic scale for appropriately measuring individuals' self-perceived mHealth literacy through a problem-based framework. METHODS: We conducted an exploratory study involving in-depth interviews and observations (15 participants) in January 2020 and used exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to identify the components of mHealth literacy and develop an item pool. In February 2020, we conducted a pilot survey with 148 participants to explore the factor structures of items identified during the exploratory study. Subsequently, 2 surveys were administrated using quota sampling. The first survey (conducted in Guangdong, China) collected 552 responses during March 2020; we assessed composite reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. The second survey (conducted in China nationwide) collected 433 responses during October 2021; we assessed criterion-related validity using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: We identified 78 items during the exploratory study. The final scale-the Problem-Based mHealth Literacy Scale-consists of 33 items that reflect 8 domains of mHealth literacy. The first web-based survey suggested that mHealth literacy consists of 8 factors (ie, subscales), namely, mHealth desire, mobile phone operational skills, acquiring mHealth information, acquiring mHealth services, understanding of medical terms, mobile-based patient-doctor communication, evaluating mHealth information, and mHealth decision-making. These factors were found to be reliable (composite reliability >0.7), with good convergent validity (average variance extracted >0.5) and discriminant validity (square root of average variance extracted are greater than the correlation coefficients between factors). The findings also revealed that these 8 factors should be grouped under a second-order factor model (χ2/df=2.701; comparative fit index 0.921; root mean square error of approximation 0.056; target coefficient 0.831). The second survey revealed that mHealth use had a significant impact (ß=0.43, P<.001) on mHealth literacy and that mHealth literacy had a significant impact (ß=0.23, P<.001) on health prevention behavior. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed the distinctiveness of mHealth literacy by placing mHealth needs, the ability to understand medical terms, and the skills in patient-doctor interactions in the foreground. The Problem-Based mHealth Literacy Scale is a useful instrument for comprehensively measuring individuals' mHealth literacy and extends the concept of health literacy to the context of mobile communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results
4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 658, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigates university students' digital health literacy and web-based information-seeking behaviours during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in England. It compares undergraduate and postgraduate students in non-health related subjects with health care students, many of whom were preparing for, or working in, frontline roles. The survey was conducted as part of a wider study by the COVID-HL research consortium. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among n = 691 university students aged ≥18 years from 25 universities across England using an adapted digital survey developed by COVID-HL. Data were collected regarding sociodemographic characteristics and specific measures drawn from the Future Anxiety Scale and the Digital Health Literacy Instrument (DHLI). These had been adapted for use in an English setting and to the specific context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Other data collected included students' anxiety or worries about the future using the Dark Future Scale as well as behaviours in online information-seeking. Data were analysed using correlations to test for relationships between constructs and also between group comparisons to test for differences between students studying health and non-health related subjects. RESULTS: Across digital health literacy dimensions, there was no significant difference between students studying health-related subjects and other students. Health care students did report greater difficulties in relation to how to behave online. They also relied less on public body sources for information about the pandemic. A significant difference was found between the two student populations in relation to their anxiety about the future with health care students reporting fewer fears about the future. CONCLUSIONS: Although digital health literacy is well developed in university students, a significant proportion of students still face difficulties with evaluating online information which may frustrate public health efforts. This could be addressed by ensuring health students' curriculum in particular encompasses digital health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776238

ABSTRACT

Health literacy (HL) is an interplay of individual and organizational health literacy (OHL). While individual HL has been intensively studied, the importance of OHL has become a greater focus of research attention. The National Action Plan Health Literacy in Germany emphasizes the promotion of HL in all areas of everyday life, including occupation and the workplace. The proposed scoping review aims at identifying and evaluating definitions, empirical studies and instruments on OHL targeting employee recipients. The search will be conducted in two consecutive steps and guided by expert-panel discussions in accordance to the method of Consensus Development Panels. The search will be conducted in Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar according to the methodological framework of Arksey and O'Malley and supplemented by the snowball principle and a hand search. All records will be included that were published until the final search date. To define eligibility criteria, the PCC framework of the Joanna Briggs Institute is used. The scoping review will critically discuss whether a new definition of OHL in the context of employee health is of purpose for future research and practice. Nonetheless, it will provide orientation in the context of employee health, also facing the consequences of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Occupational Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organizations , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 846768, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776060

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between health literacy (HL) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) severity. Methods: Pulmonary function test, sociodemographic features, Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnea scale, COPD assessment test (CAT), and the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire were used. The study examined 13,760 patients who underwent a pulmonary function test. Out of 13,760 patients, 673 patients had FEV1/FVC values less than 70%. Those with FEV1/FVC< 0.70 (n = 336) after the reversibility test were included in the study. Results: There was a significant decrease in HL and an increase in COPD severity (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the risk of severe COPD was 2.74 times higher in patients in the poor income level than in patients in the good income level. In patients with inadequate HL, the risk of developing severe COPD was 1.80 times higher. A significant difference was found in HL index scores among the groups in terms of education level and income level (p < 0.001; p < 0.001, respectively). The most difficult topics for patients with COPD were periodic health examinations, good practices in mental health, and adult vaccinations. Conclusions: Patients with COPD were found to be at a HL level well below the expected level. The risk of severe COPD increased with poor income and inadequate HL. Healthcare providers should be careful in accessing, understanding, and interpreting the health information of patients with inadequate HL. Therefore, patient education should be prioritized in the follow-up and in the treatment of patients with COPD. Physicians should pay maximum attention to patients with COPD in the regular use of drugs, their proper use, in taking preventive measures, and in adult vaccination.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 807526, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776004

ABSTRACT

Nutrition literacy plays an important role in children's dietary habits and nutrition. This study aimed to analyse the status of nutrition literacy and its influencing factors amongst middle school students in Chongqing, China. "Nutrition literacy scale for middle school students in Chongqing" was used in 29 districts of Chongqing in September 2020. The scores of nutrition literacy and its' three sub-domains (functional, interactive and critical nutrition literacy) were divided into low and high groups based on their median scores. Binary logistic regression was used to measure the influencing factors of nutrition literacy. A total of 18,660 middle school students were included in this study. The median of nutrition literacy of middle school students was 61.68 (IQR = 14.37). Interactive nutrition literacy had the highest score (median = 70.00, IQR = 20.00), followed by functional nutrition literacy (median = 68.69, IQR = 14.14) and critical nutrition literacy (median = 45.83, IQR = 25.00). Students who were the minority (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.637-0.785), in senior high school (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.477-0.548), in rural areas (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.790-0.911), receiving school meal support from the government (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.591-0.664), with other caregivers' parenting (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.805-0.914), with parents having a low level of education and with an abnormal BMI [thin (OR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.837-0.990), overweight (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.785-0.968), and obese (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.767-0.902)] presented less probability of being a high level of nutrition literacy. Our results could assist public health authorities in developing strategies of nutrition literacy promotion for references and theoretical foundations.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Nutrition Policy , Child , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 725840, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775845

ABSTRACT

Background: Health literacy, a recently determined construct plays an important role in how individuals are able to manage their health. A useful approach for the assessment of health literacy is to measure the comprehension of available patient education materials (PEMs). Objective: We aimed at assessing the usefulness of PEMS available in Hungarian by testing comprehension of selected PEMs in different groups of users. Methods: Comprehension of patient education materials in the domain of healthcare was tested by selecting PEMs and creating questions based on their text in 3 dimensions of health literacy: understand, process/appraise, apply/use. Twenty questions were created that could be answered without pre-existing knowledge by reading the appropriate text taken from PEMs. Comprehension was examined in four groups: laypersons, non-professional healthcare workers, 1st year healthcare students, and 5th year medical students. Readability indices were calculated for the same texts to which questions were created. Results: Laypersons answered <50% of the PEMs-based questions correctly. Non-professional healthcare workers performed better with 57% of right answers but significantly worse than healthcare students or medical students. Those with at least high school qualification (maturity exam) showed significantly higher comprehension compared to those with lower educational attainment. Persons in good or very good health also had significantly better comprehension than those in less favorable health. All readability indices showed that comprehension of the tested PEMs required at least 10 years of schooling or more. Therefore, these PEMS are difficult to understand for persons with less than high school level of education. Conclusion: Rephrasing of the investigated patient educational materials would be recommended so that they better fit the educational attainment of the Hungarian population. Evaluation of the readability and comprehensibility of other PEMs also seems warranted.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Comprehension , Educational Status , Humans , Patient Education as Topic
9.
Front Public Health ; 9: 752183, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775942

ABSTRACT

Emerging empirical evidence indicates a limited health literacy for a substantial proportion of children and adolescents. Although it is generally agreed upon promoting health literacy as early as possible in the lifespan, there is a lack of interventions addressing children and adolescents and their primary living environments. This article describes the development of Nebolus, a game-based intervention aiming to promote navigation health literacy at the intersection of schools and communities. Its intervention foundation lies in a socio-ecological understanding of health as well as in the Entertainment Education approach. Following an extensive literature search on health-related location-based games, a co-creation process was initiated that involved adolescents, community stakeholders, and design/IT professionals in all phases of the intervention development. The final Nebolus intervention includes three core activities: (1) a Nebolus rally app for adolescents aged 12 to 16 years, (2) an online planning tool allowing local health service providers/professionals to set up own Nebolus rallies, and (3) accompanying teaching material on health literacy in the school setting to be used before and after the Nebolus rallies. This article provides an overview of the intervention layout and discusses strengths and challenges of its development and implementation.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Adolescent , Child , Educational Status , Humans , Schools
10.
Front Public Health ; 9: 743368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775905

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the association of gender, ethnicity, living region, and socioeconomic status (SES) with health literacy and attitudes toward nevi and melanoma in Chinese adolescents and to examine whether health literacy mediates the association of SES with attitudes. Study Design: A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among newly enrolled college students. First-year students were recruited from five universities in different regions of China in 2018 using the cluster sampling method. The observers were blinded to the participants. Methods: Health literacy and attitudes were measured using a previously validated tool (Nevus and Melanoma Health Literacy and attitudes Test). SES was measured by annual family income and parental highest educational level. Nonparametric test was used to examine the association of participants' characteristics with health literacy and attitudes. Two-level generalized linear model with logarithm link function and Gamma distribution was used individually for SES. The mediation effect model was used to examine the mediation effect of health literacy. Results: A total of 21,086 questionnaires were completed by college students with a mean age of 18.0 ± 0.8 years. The mean scores of health literacy and attitudes were 9.83 ± 7.46 (maximum score: 28) and 16.98 ± 2.92 (maximum score: 20), respectively. Female, Han nationality, annual family income, and parental educational levels were positively associated with health literacy and attitudes. Regional differences showed different effects on health literacy and attitudes. A mediation model showed that literacy mediated the association of SES with attitudes toward nevi and melanoma. Health literacy mediated ~30-50% of the association of SES with attitudes. Conclusions: Melanoma-related health literacy among Chinese college students is generally insufficient and needs to be improved. Targeted and personalized health education for improving health literacy related to nevi and melanoma may improve the general population's attitudes and further promote health-related behavior to prevent and identify early-stage melanoma.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Melanoma , Students , Adolescent , Attitude , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Promotion , Humans , Socioeconomic Factors
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 774675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771112

ABSTRACT

Older Chinese adults' daily lives have been affected significantly during the outbreak phase of the COVID-19 pandemic since January 2020. They were confronted with activity restrictions due to strict pandemic prevention. The older population also had to get accustomed to widely-used modern technologies in community management, such as health codes and WeChat groups. By late 2021, mainland China had reduced the prevalence of COVID-19, and people's daily lives had primarily returned to pre-pandemic normality. Under China's systematic health management during the pandemic, older Chinese adults' responses to this nationwide public health emergency may have influenced their health in the long run. However, it remains unclear what specific health changes or improvements have occurred. Such a void in the literature is worrying, given that older adults are at high health risks due to the pandemic which, might still be with humankind for a while. Thus, it is of necessity to explore and report their health changes after this official, large-scale health intervention. In this study, 17 adults aged 55 and above were recruited as interviewees. All interviewees reside in a community located in Q district, N city of the People's Republic of China. According to the findings, many interviewees now have better literacy in health risk prevention. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) play a significant role in getting access to health information. Specifically, television, WeChat chatting groups, and TikTok could be valuable information sources for older adults. As for the understanding and evaluation of health information, although older participants can distinguish COVID-19 rumors, they may sometimes feel confused about the underlying scientific logic. Regarding changes in health behaviors and practices, many older adults can integrate health information and knowledge into their daily lives. Additionally, although interviewees can keep important social connections, not all of them are familiar with using new ICTs, such as online chatting group, for social participation and engagement. The empirical evidence suggests that both the communities and the local governments can offer specific training programs to older residents for the sake of enhancing their health literacy, health behaviors and practices, and social connectedness during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e32777, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770904

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital technologies have changed how we manage our health, and eHealth literacy is needed to engage with health technologies. Any eHealth strategy would be ineffective if users' eHealth literacy needs are not addressed. A robust measure of eHealth literacy is essential for understanding these needs. On the basis of the eHealth Literacy Framework, which identified 7 dimensions of eHealth literacy, the eHealth Literacy Questionnaire (eHLQ) was developed. The tool has demonstrated robust psychometric properties in the Danish setting, but validity testing should be an ongoing and accumulative process. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate validity evidence based on test content, response process, and internal structure of the eHLQ in the Australian community health setting. METHODS: A mixed methods approach was used with cognitive interviewing conducted to examine evidence on test content and response process, whereas a cross-sectional survey was undertaken for evidence on internal structure. Data were collected at 3 diverse community health sites in Victoria, Australia. Psychometric testing included both the classical test theory and item response theory approaches. Methods included Bayesian structural equation modeling for confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency and test-retest for reliability, and the Bayesian multiple-indicators, multiple-causes model for testing of differential item functioning. RESULTS: Cognitive interviewing identified only 1 confusing term, which was clarified. All items were easy to read and understood as intended. A total of 525 questionnaires were included for psychometric analysis. All scales were homogenous with composite scale reliability ranging from 0.73 to 0.90. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability for the 7 scales ranged from 0.72 to 0.95. A 7-factor Bayesian structural equation modeling using small variance priors for cross-loadings and residual covariances was fitted to the data, and the model of interest produced a satisfactory fit (posterior productive P=.49, 95% CI for the difference between observed and replicated chi-square values -101.40 to 108.83, prior-posterior productive P=.92). All items loaded on the relevant factor, with loadings ranging from 0.36 to 0.94. No significant cross-loading was found. There was no evidence of differential item functioning for administration format, site area, and health setting. However, discriminant validity was not well established for scales 1, 3, 5, 6, and 7. Item response theory analysis found that all items provided precise information at different trait levels, except for 1 item. All items demonstrated different sensitivity to different trait levels and represented a range of difficulty levels. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that the eHLQ is a tool with robust psychometric properties and further investigation of discriminant validity is recommended. It is ready to be used to identify eHealth literacy strengths and challenges and assist the development of digital health interventions to ensure that people with limited digital access and skills are not left behind.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Telemedicine , Australia , Bayes Theorem , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Psychometrics/methods , Public Health , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
13.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266510, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770773

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore how adolescents accessed, understood, appraised, and applied information on pandemic preventive measures, how their lives were impacted by long-lasting regulations and how they described their quality of life. METHODS: A qualitative design with focus group interviews was used to elaborate on the quantitative survey results obtained and analyzed in a previous survey study from the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic. Five focus groups with seventeen adolescents were conducted digitally during the second pandemic phase in November and December 2020. The interview data were analyzed with directed content analysis. RESULTS: The adolescents reported using traditional media and official websites as sources for Covid-19 information. They engaged in preventive behavior, and washing hands and keeping a distance from strangers had become a habit. However, not being physically close to friends felt strange and unpleasant. The measure most frequently discussed was limiting social contact, which was a constant struggle. No one disputed the authorities' guidelines and rules, but the social restrictions caused boredom and despair, particularly due to interrupted schooling and missed opportunities to engage in life events, and freely socialize with friends. CONCLUSION: The adolescents gave an overall impression of being health literate, which corresponds well with the results from our previous survey study. Their descriptions of how they translated protective measures into their everyday lives demonstrate that they took responsibility and accepted personal costs for the collective good. However, life with social restrictions decreased their quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
14.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765535

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: There is limited knowledge on how to tackle mental health problems among youth in Africa. Literature describing community engagement (CE) approaches in low/middle-income countries (LMICs) health research is sparse. CE with youth from LMICS can help steer and shape culturally relevant interventions for stigmatised topics like mental health, resulting in better healthcare experiences. We share our experience of engaging youth in Malawi through advocacy organisations to inform cultural adaptation of a mental health literacy intervention. METHODS: Young people were recruited using social media from universities and community youth organisations in Malawi to participate in focus group discussions to help culturally adapt content of an existing mental health literacy intervention. Nine online focus groups with 44 individuals were conducted. Discussions involved views and experiences of mental health, including impact of the coronavirus pandemic. Discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. RESULTS: Transcript analyses revealed a vicious cycle of poverty and mental health problems for youth in Malawi. Four key themes were identified, 1) poverty-related socioeconomic and health challenges, 2) no one talks about mental health, 3) lacking mental health support and 4) relationship issues. These themes fed into one another within this vicious cycle which perpetually and negatively impacted their lives. The coronavirus pandemic worsened socioeconomic issues, health challenges, mental health and substance use issues, and burden on Malawi's already weak mental health system. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest increasing untreated mental health burden among Malawi's youth. It highlights great need to address mental health literacy using existing community structures like educational settings to minimise burden on a weak health system. Online focus groups are an effective way of acquiring views from various young people in Malawi on mental health. This CE approach has grown our stakeholder network, strengthening potential for future CE activities and broader research dissemination.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Mental Health , Adolescent , Focus Groups , Humans , Malawi/epidemiology , Poverty
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760608

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the concomitant infodemic have emphasized the importance of digital health literacy (DHL) to global public health research and practice. The aim of this study was to examine information-seeking behavior, the ability to find, understand and deal with health information among university college students in Denmark and/in addition we wanted to examine the impact of their close social network on students' ability to find and understand health information. This research was carried out as part of the COVID-HL university student survey by using a uniform questionnaire consisting of elaborated scales. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey conducted at University College South during 4 weeks in April and May 2020. To capture DHL, four subscales of the DHL instrument were adapted to the pandemic context. A total of 59.9% of the students have sufficient DHL-most students find it rather easy to find information and are satisfied with the information they find on the internet. However, some (28.1%) students find it difficult to judge the quality and reliability of the information. Students with a sufficient level of DHL are more likely to seek information through search engines and websites of official institutions, while students with a limited level of DHL more often use social media for health information. Students with sufficient DHL more often share health information and less often ask for support in their network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark/epidemiology , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Universities
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760570

ABSTRACT

Compared to young adults, it is difficult for the older people with relatively low health literacy to perform proper bowel preparation for a colonoscopy. This study aims to identify the relationship between knowledge, compliance with bowel preparation, and bowel cleanliness with health literacy in older patients undergoing colonoscopy. The participants were 110 older people undergoing colonoscopy, recruited from an endoscopy hospital in G metropolitan city, South Korea. Data obtained from a structured questionnaire that included items on health literacy and knowledge of and compliance with bowel preparation, and the Aronchick bowel cleanliness scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ-test, Pearson's correlation, t-test, and ANCOVA. Participants who were younger and those with a higher education level and better economic status had a statistically significantly higher health literacy level. Older people with a health literacy level of 7 points and above had a higher knowledge level and bowel cleanliness index, a showed better compliance with bowel preparation. The results highlight the need for developing a customized education intervention program that can improve health literacy for successful bowel preparation and examination of the older population undergoing colonoscopy.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Aged , Cathartics , Colonoscopy , Humans , Patient Compliance , Preoperative Care/methods
17.
Am J Public Health ; 112(4): 588-589, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760047
18.
Res Gerontol Nurs ; 15(2): 57-67, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753720

ABSTRACT

The current cross-sectional descriptive study aimed to explore the association between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related health literacy, perceived risk, and intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. A sample of 414 older adults completed several questionnaires regarding COVID-19 risk perception, intention to vaccinate, and health literacy. Results revealed that more than one half of older adults demonstrated perceived high risk related to COVID-19 infection. Moreover, 31.6% of older adults noted their unwillingness to get vaccinated, and 39.4% demonstrated low health literacy regarding COVID-19. A significant positive correlation was found among older adults' perceived risk regarding COVID-19 infection, intention toward vaccination against COVID-19, and COVID-19-related health literacy. Findings serve to aid the Ministry of Health in planning proactive steps to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake in older adults. [Research in Gerontological Nursing, 15(2), 57-67.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Vaccination
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The infodemic has been co-existing with the COVID-19 pandemic with an influx of misinformation and conspiracy theories. These affect people's psychological health and adherence to preventive measures. eHealth literacy (eHEALS) may help with alleviating the negative effects of the infodemic. As nursing students are future healthcare professionals, having adequate eHEALS skills is critically important in their clinical practice, safety, and health. This study aimed to (1) explore the eHEALS level and its associated factors, and (2) examine the associations of eHEALS with preventive behaviors, fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19S), anxiety, and depression among nursing students. METHODS: We surveyed 1851 nursing students from 7 April to 31 May 2020 from eight universities across Vietnam. Data were collected, including demographic characteristics, eHEALS, adherence to preventive behaviors (handwashing, mask-wearing, physical distancing), FCV-19S, anxiety, and depression. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed appropriately to examine associations. RESULTS: The mean score of eHEALS was 31.4 ± 4.4. The eHEALS score was significantly higher in males (unstandardized regression coefficient, B, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.15 to 1.73; p = 0.019), and students with a better ability to pay for medication (B, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.39 to 1.19; p < 0.001), as compared to their counterparts. Nursing students with a higher eHEALS score had a higher likelihood of adhering to hand-washing (odds ratio, OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.22; p < 0.001), mask-wearing (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.19; p < 0.001), keeping a safe physical distance (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.25; p < 0.001), and had a lower anxiety likelihood (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.99; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students who were men and with better ability to pay for medication had higher eHEALS scores. Those with higher eHEALS scores had better adherence to preventive measures, and better psychological health. The development of strategies to improve eHEALS of nursing students may contribute to COVID-19 containment and improve their psychological health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Health Literacy , Students, Nursing , Telemedicine , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Nat Rev Nephrol ; 18(3): 135-136, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751731
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