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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841380

ABSTRACT

Digital health literacy influences decision-making in health. There are no validated instruments to evaluate the digital literacy about COVID-19 in Spanish-speaking countries. This study aimed to validate the Digital Health Literacy Instrument (DHLI) about COVID-19 adapted to Spanish (COVID-DHLI-Spanish) in university students and to describe its most important results. A cross-sectional study was developed with 2318 university students from Spain, Puerto Rico, and Ecuador. Internal consistency was measured with Cronbach's alpha and principal component analysis. Construct validity was analyzed using Spearman's correlations and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was good for the global scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.69, 95% CI 0.67) as well as for its dimensions. A total of 51.1% (n = 946) of students had sufficient digital literacy, 40.1% (n = 742) had problematic digital literacy, and 8.8% (n = 162) had inadequate digital literacy. The DHLI was directly and significantly correlated with age, subjective social perception, sense of coherence, and well-being (p < 0.001). The average digital literacy was higher in men than in women, in students older than 22 years, and in those with greater satisfaction with online information (p < 0.001). The COVID-DHLI-Spanish is useful for measuring the digital literacy about COVID-19 in Spanish-speaking countries. This study suggests gaps by gender and socioeconomic perception.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Male , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841374

ABSTRACT

Social media have become mainstream online tools that allow individuals to connect and share information. Such platforms also influence people's health behavior in the way they communicate about personal health, treatment, or physicians. Individuals' ability to find and apply online health information on specific health problems can be measured using a valid and reliable instrument, the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric aspects of the Polish version of this instrument (eHEALS-Pl) among social media users, which has not been explored so far. We examined the translated version of the eHEALS in a representative sample of Polish social media users (n = 1527). CAWI (computer-assisted web interviews) was a method to collect data. The reliability of the eHEALS-Pl was measured by calculating the Cronbach alpha coefficients and analyzing the principal components. Exploratory factor analysis and hypothesis testing was used to assess the construct validity of the instrument. The internal consistency of the eHEALS-Pl was sufficient: Cronbach alpha = 0.84. The item-to-total correlations ranged from r = 0.514 to 0.666. EFA revealed a single structure explaining 47.42% of the variance, with high factor loadings of the item ranging from 0.623 to 0.769. Hypothesis testing also supported the validity of eHEALS-Pl. The eHEALS-Pl evaluation supported by social media users reviled its equivalence to the original instrument developed by Norman and Skinner in 2006 and it can be used to measure e-health literacy. Since there is no prior validation of the eHEALS among social media users, these findings may indicate important directions in evaluating digital skills, especially in relation to the current challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Social Media , Telemedicine , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Poland , Psychometrics/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
3.
J Affect Disord ; 309: 236-241, 2022 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1804389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At present, few studies have explored the mediating effect of e-Health literacy and self-efficacy on prevention cognition and healthy lifestyle behaviors during the normalization stage of COVID-19 prevention and control. This study aimed to determine the associations among COVID-19-related prevention cognition, self-efficacy, e-Health literacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors at university students. METHODS: By using a stratified cluster random sampling method, 971 students from five universities were recruited between May and August 2021 in Guangzhou, China. We collected participants' demographic characteristics, and assessed self-efficacy, COVID-19-related prevention cognition, e-Health literacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. A structural equation model was used for mediation analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean value of healthy lifestyle behaviors of college students was 0.307 (SD 0.389). Between COVID-19-related prevention cognition, e-Health literacy, self-efficacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors (r = 0.132-0.505, P < 0.01) were a significant positive correlation. The COVID-19-related prevention cognition had a direct and positive predictive effect on healthy lifestyle behaviors, with a direct effect value of 0.136. e-Health literacy and self-efficacy played both an independent mediating and serial-multiple mediating roles in the association between COVID-19-related prevention cognition and healthy lifestyle behaviors, and the indirect effect values were 0.043, 0.020 and 0.035, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the emphasis on improving college students' prevention cognition, supplemented by improving e-Health literacy and self-efficacy, could improve college students' healthy lifestyle behaviors. LIMITATIONS: This study was a cross-sectional investigation with no causal relationship between variables.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cognition , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Literacy/methods , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Self Efficacy , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
4.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e32777, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770904

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital technologies have changed how we manage our health, and eHealth literacy is needed to engage with health technologies. Any eHealth strategy would be ineffective if users' eHealth literacy needs are not addressed. A robust measure of eHealth literacy is essential for understanding these needs. On the basis of the eHealth Literacy Framework, which identified 7 dimensions of eHealth literacy, the eHealth Literacy Questionnaire (eHLQ) was developed. The tool has demonstrated robust psychometric properties in the Danish setting, but validity testing should be an ongoing and accumulative process. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate validity evidence based on test content, response process, and internal structure of the eHLQ in the Australian community health setting. METHODS: A mixed methods approach was used with cognitive interviewing conducted to examine evidence on test content and response process, whereas a cross-sectional survey was undertaken for evidence on internal structure. Data were collected at 3 diverse community health sites in Victoria, Australia. Psychometric testing included both the classical test theory and item response theory approaches. Methods included Bayesian structural equation modeling for confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency and test-retest for reliability, and the Bayesian multiple-indicators, multiple-causes model for testing of differential item functioning. RESULTS: Cognitive interviewing identified only 1 confusing term, which was clarified. All items were easy to read and understood as intended. A total of 525 questionnaires were included for psychometric analysis. All scales were homogenous with composite scale reliability ranging from 0.73 to 0.90. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability for the 7 scales ranged from 0.72 to 0.95. A 7-factor Bayesian structural equation modeling using small variance priors for cross-loadings and residual covariances was fitted to the data, and the model of interest produced a satisfactory fit (posterior productive P=.49, 95% CI for the difference between observed and replicated chi-square values -101.40 to 108.83, prior-posterior productive P=.92). All items loaded on the relevant factor, with loadings ranging from 0.36 to 0.94. No significant cross-loading was found. There was no evidence of differential item functioning for administration format, site area, and health setting. However, discriminant validity was not well established for scales 1, 3, 5, 6, and 7. Item response theory analysis found that all items provided precise information at different trait levels, except for 1 item. All items demonstrated different sensitivity to different trait levels and represented a range of difficulty levels. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that the eHLQ is a tool with robust psychometric properties and further investigation of discriminant validity is recommended. It is ready to be used to identify eHealth literacy strengths and challenges and assist the development of digital health interventions to ensure that people with limited digital access and skills are not left behind.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Telemedicine , Australia , Bayes Theorem , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Psychometrics/methods , Public Health , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742476

ABSTRACT

Dietary quality and sustainability are central matters to the international community, emphasised by the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic. To promote healthier and more sustainable food-related practices, the protocol of a web-based intervention to enhance adults' food literacy is presented. The FOODLIT-Trial is a two-arm, parallel, experimental, and single-blinded randomised controlled trial delivered over 11 weeks. Based on the Food Literacy Wheel framework and supported by the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) and the Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy, weekly content with customised behaviour change techniques (experimental group) is hypothesised to be more effective to promote food behaviour change when compared to a single-time and non-customised delivery of food-related international guidelines, with no theoretically informed approaches (comparison group). Primary outcome is food literacy, including food-related knowledge, skills, and behaviours, assessed with the FOODLIT-Tool; a secondary outcome includes psychological mechanisms that efficaciously predict change in participants' food literacy, measured with HAPA-driven items. Enlisted through online sources, participants will be assessed across five time points (baseline, post-intervention, and 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups, i.e., T0-T4). A randomisation check will be conducted, analyses will follow an intention-to-treat approach, and linear two-level models within- (T0-T4) and between-level (nested in participants) will be computed, together with a longitudinal mediation analysis. If effective, the FOODLIT-Trial will provide for a multidimensional and cost-effective intervention to enable healthier and more sustainable food practices over the long term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Adult , Behavior Therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Food , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(1): 43-49, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381382

ABSTRACT

We aimed to explore the awareness and preparedness of dementia caregivers and people with mild cognitive deficits on how to prevent COVID-19 infection and cope with the indirect consequences of the pandemic. A total of 139 patient-caregiver dyads received a telephone survey and 109 completed the survey. The majority of respondents reported having a moderate-to-good knowledge of the typical manifestations of COVID-19. Conversely, only few of them were informed of the atypical presentations and on how to recognize emergency warning signs. Filling the knowledge gaps on COVID-19 in the most vulnerable people may represent a significant resource to tackle the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Dementia/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Literacy , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Caregivers/education , Caregivers/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy/methods , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Italy/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Symptom Assessment/methods
7.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335163

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the impacts of digital healthy diet literacy (DDL) and healthy eating behaviors (HES) on fear of COVID-19, changes in mental health, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among front-line healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS: An online survey was conducted at 15 hospitals and health centers from 6-19 April 2020. Data of 2299 front-line HCWs were analyzed-including socio-demographics, symptoms like COVID-19, health literacy, eHealth literacy, DDL, HES, fear of COVID-19, changes in mental health, and HRQoL. Regression models were used to examine the associations. RESULTS: HCWs with higher scores of DDL and HES had lower scores of FCoV-19S (regression coefficient, B, -0.04; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, -0.07, -0.02; p = 0.001; and B, -0.10; 95% CI, -0.15, -0.06; p < 0.001); had a higher likelihood of stable or better mental health status (odds ratio, OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00, 1.05; p = 0.029; and OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00, 1.07; p = 0.043); and HRQoL (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.03; p = 0.006; and OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02, 1.06; p = 0.001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: DDL and HES were found as independent predictors of fear of COVID-19, changes in mental health status, and HRQoL in front-line HCWs. Improving DDL and HES should be considered as a strategic approach for hospitals and healthcare systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Feeding Behavior , Health Literacy/methods , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Quality of Life , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/methods , Digital Technology/methods , Fear , Female , Health Status , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
J Clin Pharm Ther ; 46(6): 1498-1500, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247224

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: Preparation of patient-facing materials of a complex topic, such as describing new vaccines for COVID-19, is difficult to accomplish. This study examined the readability of patient information leaflets accompanying approved COVID-19 vaccines. COMMENT: Readability of patient-facing literature by the medicines regulator in the United States and the United Kingdom describing the recently US (FDA) and UK (MHRA) COVID-19 approved vaccines (Pfizer/BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Moderna) was assessed employing 10 metrics. Analyses showed that showed that this material had a Flesch Ease of Reading score of 53.5 and 54, respectively and a Flesch-Kincaid reading age of between 7th and 8th Grade (12-13 year olds) and between 8th and 9th Grade (13-14 year olds), respectively. When compared to a recent study on COVID-19 information on healthcare websites, the vaccine literature readability was favourable. WHAT IS NEW & CONCLUSION: Adoption of readability calculators and scrutiny of materials of their readability will help authors develop materials with improved understanding for COVID-19 vaccine recipients, carers and family, potentially leading to improved health literacy and vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Literacy/methods , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Pamphlets , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Comprehension , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Health Commun ; 25(10): 753-756, 2020 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236157

ABSTRACT

Students at schools and programs of public health will enter a workforce during the greatest public health crisis in the past century. The potential COVID-19 vaccine-one of the most promising tools to return to a new 'normal'-is held in doubt by many Americans. Vaccine literacy in the United States is a pressing issue that students of public health need to consider. We describe how a long-standing public health student crisis response team at Emory University is helping to address this challenge, and describe key principles we identify as worthy of study and focus for current public health students today. Schools and programs of public health have a timely opportunity to adapt their curricula to meet training needs of emerging public health students to equip them to address vaccine literacy while maintaining accreditation standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Public Health Professional , Health Literacy/methods , Students, Public Health , Community Participation , Health Communication/methods , Humans , Leadership , Trust
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e24577, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: eHealth literacy can potentially facilitate web-based information seeking and taking informed measures. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate socioeconomic disparities in eHealth literacy and seeking of web-based information on COVID-19, and their associations with COVID-19 preventive behaviors. METHODS: The COVID-19 Health Information Survey (CoVHIns), using telephonic (n=500) and web-based surveys (n=1001), was conducted among adults in Hong Kong in April 2020. The Chinese eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS; score range 8-40) was used to measure eHealth literacy. COVID-19 preventive behaviors included wearing surgical masks, wearing fabric masks, washing hands, social distancing, and adding water or bleach to the household drainage system. Adjusted beta coefficients and the slope indices of inequality for the eHEALS score by socioeconomic status, adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for seeking of web-based information on COVID-19 by socioeconomic status, and aORs for the high adherence to preventive behaviors by the eHEALS score and seeking of web-based information on COVID-19 were calculated. RESULTS: The mean eHEALS score was 26.10 (SD 7.70). Age was inversely associated with the eHEALS score, but education and personal income were positively associated with the eHEALS score and seeking of web-based information on COVID-19 (for all, P for trend<.05). Participants who sought web-based information on COVID-19 showed high adherence to the practice of wearing surgical masks (aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.15-2.13), washing hands (aOR 1.33, 95% CI 1.05-1.71), social distancing (aOR 1.48, 95% CI 1.14-1.93), and adding water or bleach to the household drainage system (aOR 1.67, 95% CI 1.28-2.18). Those with the highest eHEALS score displayed high adherence to the practice of wearing surgical masks (aOR 3.84, 95% CI 1.63-9.05), washing hands (aOR 4.14, 95% CI 2.46-6.96), social distancing (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.39-3.65), and adding water or bleach to the household drainage system (aOR 1.94, 95% CI 1.19-3.16), compared to those with the lowest eHEALS score. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese adults with a higher socioeconomic status had higher eHealth literacy and sought more web-based information on COVID-19; both these factors were associated with a high adherence to the guidelines for preventive behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Literacy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Socioeconomic Factors
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110248

ABSTRACT

As a result of the corona pandemic, the amount of digital health information has increased substantially. As the quantity and diversity of information increased, so does the need for evidence based and reliable health information. In the special course of study "Health Communication", students of the Bachelors program "Health Promotion" at Fulda University of Applied Sciences are enabled to develop and disseminate evidence-based health information and preventive messages that meet the demands of the target group. Due to the corona-related university closure, the module "Digital Health Communication" was realized in a digital format during the summer semester 2020. In order to activate students and promote teamwork, the study course used the approach of problem-based and research-based learning. Moreover, the course concept is based on a variety of methods, including MS Teams with screencasts, videos, synchronous teaching sessions, gamified audience response systems, the online Inverted Classroom Model and a final oral examination. Despite various challenges such as the short planning period or the necessary restructuring of a part previously planned as "en bloc", the experiences are mostly positive. Among other things, the use of MS Teams as an integrated learning, collaboration and communication platform has proven to be useful. In the students' feedback, the broad use of methods, the gamification elements and the flexibility of the lecturers are evaluated positively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digital Technology/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Health Communication/methods , Health Literacy/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 75-83, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There are concerns about nonscientific and/or unclear information on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) that is available on the Internet. Furthermore, people's ability to understand health information varies and depends on their skills in reading and interpreting information. This study aims to evaluate the readability and creditability of websites with COVID-19-related information. METHODS: The search terms "coronavirus," "COVID," and "COVID-19" were input into Google. The websites of the first thirty results for each search term were evaluated in terms of their credibility and readability using the Health On the Net Foundation code of conduct (HONcode) and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG), Gunning Fog, and Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRE) scales, respectively. RESULTS: The readability of COVID-19-related health information on websites was suitable for high school graduates or college students and, thus, was far above the recommended readability level. Most websites that were examined (87.2%) had not been officially certified by HONcode. There was no significant difference in the readability scores of websites with and without HONcode certification. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that organizations should improve the readability of their websites and provide information that more people can understand. This could lead to greater health literacy, less health anxiety, and the provision of better preventive information about the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Comprehension , Consumer Health Information/methods , Data Accuracy , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Health Literacy/methods , Internet , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Nutr Educ Behav ; 53(1): 75-78, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059744

ABSTRACT

Brighter Bites is a school-based health promotion program that delivers fresh produce and nutrition education to low-income children and their families across 6 locations in the US. This article provides a perspective on how, despite coronavirus disease 2019-related school closures, Brighter Bites pivoted rapidly to collaborate with medical and public health institutions to improve health and food literacy among their families. Through these partnerships, Brighter Bites was able to rapidly provide accurate, evidence-based information related to coronavirus disease 2019 and other social needs, including food, housing, transportation, and access to health care, to help fill a needed gap in vulnerable communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Food Assistance , Health Education/methods , Health Literacy/methods , Health Promotion/methods , School Health Services , Community Participation/methods , Fruit , Humans , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vegetables
15.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 90-96, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A request for consumer health information training for public librarians led to the development of a specialized consumer health reference and health literacy training program by professional consumer health librarians from an academic medical center. Professional consumer health librarians created an interactive presentation aimed at improving public librarians' ability to respond to consumer health questions and provide vetted health resources. CASE PRESENTATION: Building on professional expertise, librarians at Weill Cornell Medicine developed a live class demonstration accompanied by a representative subject LibGuide to support public librarians who assist patrons with health questions. Skills involved in effectively communicating with patrons who are seeking consumer health information include conducting reference interviews, matching patrons' needs with appropriate resources, teaching useful Internet search methods, assessing health information, and understanding health literacy issues. Originally envisioned as two in-person live demonstrations, the team proactively adapted the program to respond to the stay-at-home social-distancing order put in place in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The team successfully led an in-person live training session followed by an adapted online training experience, the latter designed to complete the curricula while complying with city and state orders.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Consumer Health Information/methods , Consumer Health Information/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Health Literacy/methods , Librarians/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Health Informatics J ; 27(1): 1460458220975466, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033084

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, it is common for people to look for health care information on the internet. The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) is commonly used to measure eHealth literacy. As of the publication of this study, the Indonesian version for eHEALS has not been published even though eHealth literacy is necessary, especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic. We aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Indonesian version of eHEALS (I-eHEALS). A total of 100 respondents in East Java were involved in this cross-sectional study. Pearson-product moment correlation method and construct validity were used to validate the results. The reliability was determined based on the Cronbach's alpha internal consistency measurement and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The Pearson correlation analysis results are significantly higher (r > 0.254, p < 0.01) compared to the critical value table. Single factors accounting for 57.66% variance in the scales exhibit a unidimensional latent structure. The internal consistency between items is excellent as shown by the Cronbach's alpha coefficient (0.91). The ICC analysis shows an acceptable result (0.552, p < 0.01). The I-eHEALS is valid and reliable to be used for evaluating the eHealth literacy of the Indonesian population.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Internet , Male , Pandemics , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Telemedicine , Translating , Young Adult
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e24097, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032503

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Digital communication technologies are playing an important role in the health communication strategies of governments and public health authorities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The internet and social media have become important sources of health-related information on COVID-19 and on protective behaviors. In addition, the COVID-19 infodemic is spreading faster than the coronavirus itself, which interferes with governmental health-related communication efforts. This jeopardizes national public health containment strategies. Therefore, digital health literacy is a key competence to navigate web-based COVID-19-related information and service environments. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate university students' digital health literacy and web-based information-seeking behaviors during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. METHODS: A cross-sectional study among 14,916 university students aged ≥18 years from 130 universities across all 16 federal states of Germany was conducted using a web-based survey. Along with sociodemographic characteristics (sex, age, subjective social status), the measures included five subscales from the Digital Health Literacy Instrument (DHLI), which was adapted to the specific context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Web-based information-seeking behavior was investigated by examining the web-based sources used by university students and the topics that the students searched for in connection with COVID-19. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses. RESULTS: Across digital health literacy dimensions, the greatest difficulties could be found for assessing the reliability of health-related information (5964/14,103, 42.3%) and the ability to determine whether the information was written with a commercial interest (5489/14,097, 38.9%). Moreover, the respondents indicated that they most frequently have problems finding the information they are looking for (4282/14,098, 30.4%). When stratified according to sociodemographic characteristics, significant differences were found, with female university students reporting a lower DHLI for the dimensions of "information searching" and "evaluating reliability." Search engines, news portals, and websites of public bodies were most often used by the respondents as sources to search for information on COVID-19 and related issues. Female students were found to use social media and health portals more frequently, while male students used Wikipedia and other web-based encyclopedias as well as YouTube more often. The use of social media was associated with a low ability to critically evaluate information, while the opposite was observed for the use of public websites. CONCLUSIONS: Although digital health literacy is well developed in university students, a significant proportion of students still face difficulties with certain abilities to evaluate information. There is a need to strengthen the digital health literacy capacities of university students using tailored interventions. Improving the quality of health-related information on the internet is also key.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Literacy/methods , Information Seeking Behavior/physiology , Internet/standards , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
Qual Manag Health Care ; 30(1): 49-60, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is transforming the health care sector. As health care organizations move from crisis mobilization to a new landscape of health and social needs, organizational health literacy offers practical building blocks to provide high-quality, efficient, and meaningful care to patients and their families. Organizational health literacy is defined by the Institute of Medicine as "the degree to which an organization implements policies, practices, and systems that make it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health." METHODS: This article synthesizes insights from organizational health literacy in the context of current major health care challenges and toward the goal of innovation in patient-centered care. We first provide a brief overview of the origins and outlines of organizational health literacy research and practice. Second, using an established patient-centered innovation framework, we show how the existing work on organizational health literacy can offer a menu of effective, patient-centered innovative options for care delivery systems to improve systems and outcomes. Finally, we consider the high value of management focusing on organizational health literacy efforts, specifically for patients in health care transitions and in the rapid transformation of care into myriad distance modalities. RESULTS: This article provides practical guidance for systems and informs decisions around resource allocation and organizational priorities to best meet the needs of patient populations even in the face of financial and workforce disruption. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational health literacy principles and guidelines provide a road map for promoting patient-centered care even in this time of crisis, change, and transformation. Health system leaders seeking innovative approaches can have access to well-established tool kits, guiding models, and materials toward many organizational health literacy goals across treatment, diagnosis, prevention, education, research, and outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Literacy , Patient-Centered Care , Health Literacy/methods , Health Literacy/organization & administration , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , Patient-Centered Care/methods , Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , Resource Allocation/methods , Resource Allocation/organization & administration
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(11): e22894, 2020 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895258

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed a heavy burden on health care systems and governments. Health literacy (HL) and eHealth literacy (as measured by the eHealth Literacy Scale [eHEALS]) are recognized as strategic public health elements but they have been underestimated during the pandemic. HL, eHEALS score, practices, lifestyles, and the health status of health care workers (HCWs) play crucial roles in containing the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the eHEALS and examine associations of HL and eHEALS scores with adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) procedures, lifestyle changes, and suspected COVID-19 symptoms among HCWs during lockdown. METHODS: We conducted an online survey of 5209 HCWs from 15 hospitals and health centers across Vietnam from April 6 to April 19, 2020. Participants answered questions related to sociodemographics, HL, eHEALS, adherence to IPC procedures, behavior changes in eating, smoking, drinking, and physical activity, and suspected COVID-19 symptoms. Principal component analysis, correlation analysis, and bivariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression models were used to validate the eHEALS and examine associations. RESULTS: The eHEALS had a satisfactory construct validity with 8 items highly loaded on one component, with factor loadings ranked from 0.78 to 0.92 explaining 76.34% of variance; satisfactory criterion validity as correlated with HL (ρ=0.42); satisfactory convergent validity with high item-scale correlations (ρ=0.80-0.84); and high internal consistency (Cronbach α=.95). HL and eHEALS scores were significantly higher in men (unstandardized coefficient [B]=1.01, 95% CI 0.57-1.45, P<.001; B=0.72, 95% CI 0.43-1.00, P<.001), those with a better ability to pay for medication (B=1.65, 95% CI 1.25-2.05, P<.001; B=0.60, 95% CI 0.34-0.86, P<.001), doctors (B=1.29, 95% CI 0.73-1.84, P<.001; B 0.56, 95% CI 0.20-0.93, P=.003), and those with epidemic containment experience (B=1.96, 95% CI 1.56-2.37, P<.001; B=0.64, 95% CI 0.38-0.91, P<.001), as compared to their counterparts, respectively. HCWs with higher HL or eHEALS scores had better adherence to IPC procedures (B=0.13, 95% CI 0.10-0.15, P<.001; B=0.22, 95% CI 0.19-0.26, P<.001), had a higher likelihood of healthy eating (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.06, P=.001; OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.07, P=.002), were more physically active (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.03, P<.001; OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.05, P<.001), and had a lower likelihood of suspected COVID-19 symptoms (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.98, P<.001; OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P<.001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The eHEALS is a valid and reliable survey tool. Gender, ability to pay for medication, profession, and epidemic containment experience were independent predictors of HL and eHEALS scores. HCWs with higher HL or eHEALS scores had better adherence to IPC procedures, healthier lifestyles, and a lower likelihood of suspected COVID-19 symptoms. Efforts to improve HCWs' HL and eHEALS scores can help to contain the COVID-19 pandemic and minimize its consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Literacy/methods , Health Personnel/standards , Psychometrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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