Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 214-224, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433767

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has caused feelings of anxiety, confusion, and panic among the world population. Due to these psychological changes resulting from the stress produced by the disease, we sought to investigate the psychological impact of the pandemic on the university student community. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 1,283 students were surveyed, of which 1,149 students were selected. The majority of the subjects were female, and the overall average age was of 20 years. They were provided with an 82-question online questionnaire divided into four sections; looking for the prevalence of significant symptomatology of major depression and generalised anxiety using the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scales; and factors that potentially affect the mental health of our university population. RESULTS: We found a high prevalence of significant depression (47.08%) and anxiety (27.06%) symptomatology, considering a score of 10 or more as cut-off point. There was no significant difference in depression and anxiety symptomatology between the health-care students and non-health-care students. CONCLUSIONS: Our results, together with what is observed in the literature, allow us to conclude that the college student population has a high risk of mental illness, and these should be taken into consideration for the search of effective strategies for detection and control of mental health illnesses. Undoubtedly, the COVID-19 pandemic is a red flag that shows the need to upgrade mental health programmes in universities and to validate virtual instruments.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Students/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Occupations/education , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychological Tests , Social Determinants of Health , Universities , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to explore factors influencing the study engagement of health and social professions students during the COVID-19 pandemic. While antecedents of study engagement have been studied previously, the factors influencing engagement under pandemic conditions have not yet been investigated. Furthermore, there is a particular need for research among students in health and social professions programs, as these students are particularly affected by the pandemic. As theoretical basis, the study draws on the demands-resources-theory. It is hypothesized that pandemic-related study and personal resources drive engagement during the pandemic, and that pandemic-related demands negatively influence engagement. METHOD: The study uses a cross-sectional survey to explore the hypothesized effects. The sample consists of 559 university students of health and social professions in Germany. The study was carried out in July 2020, towards the end of the first digital semester and after the first peak in COVID-19 cases. Data are analyzed using linear multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: The findings show that the demands-resources-theory is suitable to explain study engagement even under pandemic conditions. Suitable digital learning formats and social support are identified as important study resources for study engagement during major life events, while emotional resilience, active self-care and academic self-efficacy are identified as important personal resources. CONCLUSIONS: Under pandemic conditions academic institutions should focus on providing beneficial teaching formats and innovative ways to support students lacking social networks. Besides, they should consider developing means to help students structuring daily life as well as establishing initiatives to strengthen students' self-efficacy beliefs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Occupations/education , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Young Adult
7.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(5): Doc90, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295612

ABSTRACT

Background: In the bachelor degree program Interprofessional Health Care that combines professional training and study, students work part-time in their chosen professions after completing training. The increase in students' working hours due to COVID-19 and the switch to a digital teaching format raised the question as to how a successful and flexible educational concept can be created online in this context. A blended-learning strategy in combination with a competency model for interprofessional learning was chosen as theoretical reference point for implementation. Based on a module for academic poster presentation in front of an interprofessional plenum, the sequence of the learning process organization in the phases "kick-off", "self-directed learning" and "online seminar" is exemplified and discussed with regard to its suitability for digital interprofessional teaching. Implementation: During implementation it was important to clearly define the module's scope and sequence at the very beginning. The use of screencasts enabled students to individually pace their learning during the preparatory self-directed learning phase. Embedding assignments in the screencasts served to aid students in their learning. The synchronous exchange in interprofessional small groups was experienced as profitable for the own poster production. Several students perceive their own poster presentation in digital format as an increase in competence and a basis for future academic presentations. Summary: In summary, the entire interprofessional module was successfully implemented digitally in the phases "kick-off", "self-directed learning" and "online seminar". For synchronous learning, virtual small group workspaces seem particularly suitable for learner activation. The practical implementation of the acquired competencies in the form of the poster presentation is crucial for ensuring the learning success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Curriculum , Health Occupations/education , Internet , Interprofessional Education/methods , Pandemics , Academic Success , Humans , Learning , Professional Competence , Students , Teaching
8.
Lancet ; 397(10288): 1992-2011, 2021 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218908

ABSTRACT

Approximately 13% of the total UK workforce is employed in the health and care sector. Despite substantial workforce planning efforts, the effectiveness of this planning has been criticised. Education, training, and workforce plans have typically considered each health-care profession in isolation and have not adequately responded to changing health and care needs. The results are persistent vacancies, poor morale, and low retention. Areas of particular concern highlighted in this Health Policy paper include primary care, mental health, nursing, clinical and non-clinical support, and social care. Responses to workforce shortfalls have included a high reliance on foreign and temporary staff, small-scale changes in skill mix, and enhanced recruitment drives. Impending challenges for the UK health and care workforce include growing multimorbidity, an increasing shortfall in the supply of unpaid carers, and the relative decline of the attractiveness of the National Health Service (NHS) as an employer internationally. We argue that to secure a sustainable and fit-for-purpose health and care workforce, integrated workforce approaches need to be developed alongside reforms to education and training that reflect changes in roles and skill mix, as well as the trend towards multidisciplinary working. Enhancing career development opportunities, promoting staff wellbeing, and tackling discrimination in the NHS are all needed to improve recruitment, retention, and morale of staff. An urgent priority is to offer sufficient aftercare and support to staff who have been exposed to high-risk situations and traumatic experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. In response to growing calls to recognise and reward health and care staff, growth in pay must at least keep pace with projected rises in average earnings, which in turn will require linking future NHS funding allocations to rises in pay. Through illustrative projections, we show that, to sustain annual growth in the workforce at approximately 2·4%, increases in NHS expenditure of 4% annually in real terms will be required. Above all, a radical long-term strategic vision is needed to ensure that the future NHS workforce is fit for purpose.


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , State Medicine/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Health Occupations/economics , Health Occupations/education , Health Workforce/economics , Humans , Occupational Stress , Personnel Selection , State Medicine/economics , United Kingdom
9.
AMA J Ethics ; 23(2): E127-131, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082469

ABSTRACT

Health professions educators continuously adapt curricular content in response to new scientific knowledge but can struggle to incorporate content about current social issues that profoundly affect students and learning environments. This article offers recommendations to support innovation and action as students and faculty grapple with ongoing unrest in the United States, including racism, murders of Black people by police, and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Educators , Health Occupations/education , Racism/psychology , Social Justice/psychology , African Americans , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Law Enforcement , United States
10.
Front Public Health ; 8: 575500, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067676

ABSTRACT

There are 22 different degree courses related to the Healthcare Professions in the Italian university system, which are divided into four areas. "Healthcare Professions of Prevention" is the fourth area and it is fundamental for the National Health Service. In particular, in this pandemic emergency situation, the contribution of the Prevention Technicians in the Environment and Workplaces (PTEW) is essential in the field and workplace management. The "Core Competence" of the PTEW is to carry out, with professional autonomy, prevention, verification, and control activities in the field of hygiene and safety of living and working environments. In the hospitals, the indications provided by national and/or regional authorities are implemented through procedures on good hygiene practices developed by PTEW (e.g., hand hygiene, "respiratory tract hygiene," environmental hygiene, social distancing, and use of Personal Protective Equipment). One of the activities is the health surveillance on the field by population monitoring. The protocols foreseen for the "in-flow of workers" involve a wider control between social life and work. The PTEW will use a Check List divided into 3 macro phases: Entry, Activity Context, and Exit, defining each behavior of the work phases with a constant presence of verification of the procedures. The PTEW will be a Leader on the topics of education, training, and persuasion, considering a New Principle that "transforms the worker as active part in the application and diffusion of the safety measures".


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Occupations/education , Health Personnel , Occupational Health/standards , State Medicine , Workplace/standards , Curriculum , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Italy , Personal Protective Equipment , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Perspect Med Educ ; 9(6): 385-390, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Conversations about educational challenges and potential solutions among a globally and culturally diverse group of health professions' educators can facilitate identity formation, mentoring relationships and professional network building. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it even more important to co-create and disseminate knowledge, specifically regarding online and flexible learning formats. APPROACH: Based on the principles of social learning, we combined speed mentoring and world café formats to offer a virtual Zoom™ workshop, with large and small group discussions, to reach health professions' educators across the globe. The goal was to establish a psychologically safe space for dialogue regarding adaptation to online teaching-learning formats. EVALUATION: We aimed to establish psychological safety to stimulate thought-provoking discussions within the various small groups and obtain valuable contributions from participants. From these conversations, we were able to formulate 'hot tips' on how to adapt to (sometimes new) online teaching-learning formats while nurturing teacher and student wellbeing. REFLECTION: Through this virtual workshop we realized that despite contextual differences, many challenges are common worldwide. We experienced technological difficulties during the session, which needed rapid adaptation by the organising team. We encouraged, but did not pressure, participants to use video and audio during breakout discussions as we wanted them to feel safe and comfortable. The large audience size and different time zones were challenging; therefore, leadership had to be resilient and focussed. Although this virtual format was triggered by the pandemic, the format can be continued in the future to discuss other relevant global education topics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Professional/methods , Health Occupations/education , Adaptation, Psychological , Communication , Congresses as Topic , Humans , Learning , Mentoring , Teaching
14.
J Allied Health ; 49(4): e161-e165, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-952686

ABSTRACT

Sense of community is valued in higher education but can become a challenge, especially when classroom time is reduced or eliminated in blended and online coursework. As COVID-19 has forced the rapid transition to remote teaching, strategies for optimizing interactivity and discussion in both synchronous and asynchronous environments have become increasingly important. Here we focus first on the theoretical framework for the importance of sense of community in education, followed by a discussion of evidence-based variables that increase students' sense of belonging. Emphasis is placed on strategies that promote discussion and participation across course formats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Health Occupations/education , Students, Health Occupations/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Environment , Social Participation
15.
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract ; 25(5): 1191-1201, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947039

ABSTRACT

The paper reviews 50 years of research in health sciences education and identifies several recurring controversies-formative versus summative assessment, high and low fidelity simulation, expertise as knowledge versus skills, and the impact of teaching versus curriculum. I then look at the role these may play in the current situation where COVID has necessitated rapid change to distance learning. I then posit an essential role for research in teaching and learning, using multiple methods from qualitative to neuropsychological to better understand the dimensions of effective teaching. The ultimate goal is to operationalize these findings in creation of distance learning modules.


Subject(s)
Health Occupations/education , Research/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Simulation Training
16.
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract ; 25(5): 1149-1162, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932567

ABSTRACT

Health professions education is that part of the education system which applies educational philosophy, theory, principles and practice in a complex relationship with busy clinical services, where education is not the primary role. While the goals are clear-to produce the health workforce that society needs to improve health outcomes-both education and healthcare systems continue to evolve concurrently amidst changes in knowledge, skills, population demographics and social contracts. In observing a significant anniversary of this journal, which sits at the junction of education and healthcare systems, it is appropriate to reflect on how the relationship is evolving. Health professions educators must listen to the voices of regulators, employers, students and patients when adapting to new service delivery models that emerge in response to pressures for change. The recent COVID-19 pandemic is one example of disruptive change, but other factors, such as population pressures and climate change, can also drive innovations that result in lasting change. Emerging technology may act as either a servant of change or a disruptor. There is a pressing need for interdisciplinary research that develops a theory and evidence base to strengthen sustainability of change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Faculty/organization & administration , Health Occupations/education , Curriculum , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/standards , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics , Politics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 18(1): 71, 2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-881103

ABSTRACT

Regulation of the health workforce and accreditation of educational institutions are intended to protect the public interest, but evidence of the impact of these policies is scarce and occasionally contradictory. The body of research that does exist primarily focuses on policies in the global north and on the major health professions. Stress on accreditation and regulatory systems caused by surges in demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic, privatization of education, rising patient expectations, and emergence of new health worker categories has created urgency for innovation and reform. To understand and evaluate this innovation, we look forward to receiving manuscripts which contribute to the evidence base on the implementation, management, and impact of health worker education and practice regulation, including the intersection of education accreditation and workforce regulation policy. We particularly look forward to manuscripts from underrepresented parts of the globe and underrepresented health workforce sectors that address policy effectiveness, explore different models of regulation, and present innovations that we can all learn from.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/standards , Health Occupations/education , Health Workforce/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
18.
Cell ; 183(2): 296-300, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-866493

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has revealed that Africa needs a new public health order to be resilient, to adapt, and to cope with 21st-century disease threats. The new order will need strengthened continental and national public health institutions; local manufacturing of vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics; attraction, training, and retention of a public health workforce; and fostering of respectful local and international partnerships.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Public Health , Africa , Communicable Disease Control , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Health Occupations/education , Health Workforce , Humans , International Cooperation , Public Health/education , Public Health Administration
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...