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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 402, 2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The diversity of tasks entrusted to medical teachers with their simultaneous responsibility for the safety of patients and the effective education of future healthcare professionals requires maintaining a skillful balance between their teaching, scientific and clinical activities. Meanwhile, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the work of both healthcare facilities and medical universities, forcing already overworked medical teachers to establish a new balance. One's ability to perform effectively in new, ambiguous, or unpredictable situations was described by Albert Bandura as a self-efficacy concept. Consequently, this study aimed to identify factors affecting the self-efficacy of medical teachers and the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on them. METHODS: Twenty-five semi-structured interviews with medical teachers were conducted using a flexible thematic guide. They were transcribed and analyzed by two independent researchers (researcher triangulation) with phenomenology as the qualitative approach. RESULTS: Identified themes demonstrate a process of the evolvement of clinical teachers' self-efficacy in response to the sudden outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, namely the decline of self-efficacy in the first phase of the crisis, followed by building task-specific self-efficacy and the development of general self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows the significance of providing care and support for medical teachers during a health crisis. Crisis management decision-makers at educational and healthcare institutions should consider the different roles of medical teachers and the possibility of overburden associated with the cumulation of the excessive number of patient, didactic, and research duties. Moreover, faculty development initiatives and teamwork should become a vital part of the organizational culture of medical universities. A dedicated tool acknowledging the specificity and context of medical teachers' work seems necessary to quantitatively evaluate their sense of self-efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self Efficacy , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty , Health Personnel/education
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 335, 2023 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Involving patients and carers in medical students' learning aims to centralise the perspective of healthcare users and supports our future medical workforce in the development of key skills. Medical schools are increasingly using digital technology for teaching and it is timely to understand how to maintain patient and carer involvement in this context. METHODS: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE and medRxiv were searched in October 2020 and reference lists of key articles were hand searched. Eligible studies reported authentic patient or carer involvement in undergraduate medical education where technology was also used. Study quality was assessed by the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Levels of patient or carer involvement were assessed using Towle et al.'s (2010) taxonomy, from Level 1 (lowest level) to Level 6 (highest level). RESULTS: Twenty studies were included in this systematic review. In 70% of studies, patients and carers featured in video or web-based case scenarios with no interaction between healthcare users and students. The remaining 30% of studies reported real-time interactions between students and patients via remote clinical encounters. Digital teaching sessions involving patients or carers were perceived to be valuable by students and educators, and increased student engagement, patient-centred attitudes, clinical knowledge, and communication skills. No studies reported the perspective of patients or carers. DISCUSSION: Digital technology has not yet driven higher levels of patient and carer involvement in medical training. "Live" interactions between students and patients are becoming more common but challenges need addressing to ensure positive experiences for all involved. Future teaching should enhance the role of patients and carers in medical education and support them to overcome any potential barriers to doing so remotely.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Caregivers , Health Personnel/education , Learning
3.
BMJ Glob Health ; 8(4)2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301446

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted all aspects of life globally and laid bare the pervasive inequities in access to education, employment, healthcare and economic security in both high-resource and low-resource settings. The global health field's brittle attempts of addressing global health inequities, through efforts that in some cases have evoked the colonialist forces implicated in shaping these disparities, have been further challenged by the pandemic. COVID-19 has forced global health leaders to reimagine their field through innovation such as shifting the application of global health to a local focus, collaborating with community organisations and exploring virtual education technologies. We present four case studies illustrating this promising movement towards a more sustainable, ethical and equitable model of global health education practice.Case 1: trainees from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health partnered with the Board of Health of Holyoke, a majority Latinx city with high poverty levels, to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic through research and intervention. Case 2: Prevencasa, a community health organisation in Tijuana, Mexico, providing healthcare to local underserved communities, shifted its focus from hosting international trainees to developing a multidisciplinary training programme for Mexican healthcare professionals. Case 3: the Johns Hopkins Global Health Leadership Program adapted its curriculum into a hybrid online and in-person migrant health and human rights elective, collaborating with local organisations. Case 4: a US-based and a Latin American-based organisation collaborated to create a longitudinal, virtual urogynaecology training programme with hybrid simulation practice to increase accessibility of procedural-based training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Global Health , Health Personnel/education , Health Promotion
4.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 70: 103638, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301403

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe the various teaching and learning modalities for the delivery of Continuing Professional Development activities for health care professionals in the long-term care sector. BACKGROUND: Continuing Professional Development is a key activity that organisations undertake to achieve effective workforce planning, recruitment, retention and upskilling strategies in long-term care settings. During the Covid-19 pandemic there was a rapid move to online modalities of Continuous Professional Development, but there is a paucity of evidence in relation to their effectiveness compared with face-to-face, or in-class learning. DESIGN: A rapid synthesis review. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL and HEALTH BUSINESS ELITE databases were used to identify relevant articles that were published between 2016 and 2022. Original studies of any design investigating Continuing Professional Development activities, with or without a comparison between interventions or activities were included. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was followed. The Kirkpatrick model was adopted as a globally recognised method for evaluating training programmes. RESULTS: After a full text analysis, 34 papers were included in the review. Face to face was the most common method of delivery followed by online, while blended (a mix of face-to-face and online delivery) was the least common method used. The teaching modalities were not associated with specific learning contents, but were used for a range of content. Most studies obtained positive outcomes following implementation of the educational interventions. Kirkpatrick Level 4 (results) was the most commonly measured outcome. CONCLUSIONS: While blended learning was the least common method of delivery, it was found to be more beneficial for learners than face-to-face or online exclusively. There are now new spaces to learn and new technologies that allow us to 'reimagine' where, when and how we teach. This requires Continuing Professional Development providers to design and tailor their courses according to health professionals' learning needs and the clinical contexts where they work. We recommend that Continuing Professional Development providers involve employers when designing teaching and learning activities for Long Term Care workers, to decide which modalities enable effective knowledge translation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Long-Term Care , Humans , Pandemics , Learning , Health Personnel/education
5.
Educ Prim Care ; 34(1): 7-15, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253018

ABSTRACT

International knowledge exchanges within healthcare have historically been a popular method to provide exposure to practice in other national and international healthcare settings. As the COVID-19 pandemic forced many countries into lockdowns, knowledge exchanges in healthcare were forced into a period of suspension. This provided an opportunity to consider alternative methods of delivery. This scoping review explores virtual knowledge exchanges in healthcare professional education, including their format and related outcomes. Thirty-four virtual knowledge exchanges were identified. These demonstrated viability and subjective participant satisfaction. Virtual methods removed barriers of time, distance and finance associated with traditional exchanges, while still facilitating engagement with other international healthcare colleagues. However these exchanges were heterogeneous in their aims, structure and theoretical underpinnings. An understanding of educational outcomes and their measurement was not always obvious. Applying an overlay of robust pedagogical theory would strengthen and provide structure to the clearly well valued activity of international exchange.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Communicable Disease Control , Health Personnel/education , Delivery of Health Care
6.
JBI Evid Synth ; 21(5): 913-951, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259901

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to describe and map the evidence on COVID-19 and H1N1 vaccine hesitancy or refusal by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists in North America, the United Kingdom and the European Union, and Australia. INTRODUCTION: Since 2009, we have experienced two pandemics: H1N1 "swine flu" and COVID-19. While severity and transmissibility of these viruses varied, vaccination has been a critical component of bringing both pandemics under control. However, uptake of these vaccines has been affected by vaccine hesitancy and refusal. The vaccination behaviors of health care providers, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, are of particular interest as they have been priority populations to receive both H1N1 and COVID-19 vaccinations. Their vaccination views could affect the vaccination decisions of their patients. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Studies were eligible for inclusion if they identified reasons for COVID-19 or H1N1 vaccine hesitancy or refusal among physicians, nurses, or pharmacists from the included countries. Published and unpublished literature were eligible for inclusion. Previous reviews were excluded; however, the reference lists of relevant reviews were searched to identify additional studies for inclusion. METHODS: A search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Academic Search Premier databases was conducted April 28, 2021, to identify English-language literature published from 2009 to 2021. Gray literature and citation screening were also conducted to identify additional relevant literature. Titles, abstracts, and eligible full-text articles were reviewed in duplicate by 2 trained reviewers. Data were extracted in duplicate using a structured extraction tool developed for the review. Conflicts were resolved through discussion or with a third team member. Data were synthesized using narrative and tabular summaries. RESULTS: In total, 83 articles were included in the review. Studies were conducted primarily across the United States, the United Kingdom, and France. The majority of articles (n=70) used cross-sectional designs to examine knowledge, attitudes, and uptake of H1N1 (n=61) or COVID-19 (n=22) vaccines. Physicians, medical students, nurses, and nursing students were common participants in the studies; however, only 8 studies included pharmacists in their sample. Across health care settings, most studies were conducted in urban, academic teaching hospitals, with 1 study conducted in a rural hospital setting. Concerns about vaccine safety, vaccine side effects, and perceived low risk of contracting H1N1 or COVID-19 were the most common reasons for vaccine hesitancy or refusal across both vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: With increased interest and attention on vaccines in recent years, intensified by the COVID-19 pandemic, more research that examines vaccine hesitancy or refusal across different health care settings and health care providers is warranted. Future work should aim to utilize more qualitative and mixed methods research designs to capture the personal perspectives of vaccine hesitancy and refusal, and consider collecting data beyond the common urban and academic health care settings identified in this review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Vaccines , Humans , Animals , Swine , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education
7.
Postgrad Med J ; 99(1167): 25-31, 2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2288920

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation via Instant Messaging-Birmingham Advance (SIMBA) delivers simulation-based learning through WhatsApp and Zoom, helping to sustain continuing medical education (CME) for postgraduate healthcare professionals otherwise disrupted by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aimed to assess whether SIMBA helped to improve clinical knowledge and if this improvement in knowledge was sustained over time. METHODS: Two SIMBA sessions-thyroid and pituitary-were conducted in July-August 2020. Each session included simulation of various real-life cases and interactive discussion. Participants' self-reported confidence, acceptance, and knowledge were measured using surveys and multiple-choice questions pre- and post-simulation and in a 6- to 12-week follow-up period. The evaluation surveys were designed using Moore's 7 Levels of CME Outcomes Framework. RESULTS: A total of 116 participants were included in the analysis. Significant improvement was observed in participants' self-reported confidence in approach to simulated cases (thyroid, n = 37, P < .0001; pituitary, n = 79, P < .0001). Significant improvement in clinical knowledge was observed following simulation (thyroid, n = 37, P < .0001; pituitary, n = 79, P < .0001). For both sessions, retention of confidence and knowledge was seen at 6-12 weeks' follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: SIMBA increased participants' clinical knowledge on simulated cases and this improvement was retained up to 6-12 weeks after the session. Further studies are required to explore long-term retention and whether it translates to improved real-world clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Education, Medical, Continuing , Clinical Competence
8.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2135852, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265297

ABSTRACT

This review aimed to identify barriers to employee vaccination, motivators for vaccination, and vaccine uptake strategies within the critical infrastructure sectors. We focused on non-healthcare-related sectors, including food and agriculture, manufacturing, and education where employee vaccination is rarely mandated. We conducted a search for literature published from 2012 to 2022 from MEDLINE-PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science Core Collection, which resulted in 22 studies that met the inclusion criteria. We found that 1) barriers to vaccination differ by infectious disease and population; 2) common motivators for vaccination were about protecting self, family, and community; and 3) common uptake strategies for influenza (which accounted for 83% of uptake strategies in reviewed studies) addressed convenience and confidence barriers such as vaccination cost and education. Our review highlights the need for employers, policymakers, and researchers to identify infectious disease and population-specific barriers to vaccination and implement strategies aimed at addressing the identified barriers.


Subject(s)
Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Humans , Health Personnel/education , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Vaccination
9.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 23(1): 24-30, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2217563

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at increased risk of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Personal protective equipment (PPE) and infection control guidelines help limit transmission. However, poor confidence leads to higher levels of anxiety rates and infection. We assessed knowledge and confidence in PPE among HCWs and associated anxiety. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centre survey using a validated questionnaire assessing actual and self-perceived knowledge on PPE was distributed among HCWs across the UK. Confidence in PPE and levels of anxiety were assessed using the General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) tool. RESULTS: In total, 1,055 responses were received; 99% had familiarity with PPE guidance; however, only 15% correctly answered questions on PPE guidance; 86% and 80% had received mask-fitting and donning-doffing training, respectively; 33% indicated poor/very poor hospital communication. Confidence and anxiety were related to: profession; comorbidities; self-perceived knowledge; and PPE training and communication. CONCLUSION: Confidence in PPE was poor and anxiety was related to inadequate information and training. Thus, improved communication is required for effective response to subsequent COVID-19 waves and similar pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Protective Devices , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Health Personnel/education , Anxiety , United Kingdom/epidemiology
10.
Arq. ciências saúde UNIPAR ; 26(3)set-dez. 2022.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2205389

ABSTRACT

Introdução: A violência contra à mulher é caracterizada especialmente pela desigualdade de gênero, diferença hierárquica, subordinação e pela agressividade do parceiro ou ex-parceiro. Entre os principais subtipos, cita-se; a violência física, psicológica, sexual, patrimonial e moral. Com o surgimento da pandemia de coronavírus em 2020 na tentativa de contenção da doença, medidas protetivas como o isolamento social aumentaram o convívio familiar. Dessa forma, as vítimas de violência passaram a ficar ainda mais tempo expostas aos seus agressores e consequentemente com maiores dificuldades para denunciar os abusos sofridos, pois a prestação dos serviços públicos, instituições de segurança e judiciais também foram restringidas. Objetivo: Caracterizar os casos de violência contra a mulher em tempos de pandemia de coronavírus em um município do Sudoeste do Paraná. Materiais e métodos: Trata-se de um estudo descritivo, documental e transversal com abordagem quantitativa realizada em um município do Sudoeste do Paraná a partir da coleta de dados, por meio das fichas de notificação de violência contra a mulher entre 2019 e 2021. Resultados e discussão: O estudo demonstrou prevalência de notificações no ano de 2019 em mulheres com idade de 12 a 18 anos (27,2%), brancas (71,3%), com ensino médio (21,9%), sendo ainda estudantes (23,1%) ou desempregadas (17,2%), sem companheiro (52,4%), residentes da área urbana (74%), heterossexuais (50,6%), sem possuir algum tipo de deficiência (51,8%). Ao verificar a tipologia da agressão com maior incidência, observou-se a lesão autoprovocada (53,6%) por meio da intoxicação /envenenamento (41,4%). Quanto a violência interpessoal, notou-se que a maioria das agressões foram ocasionadas pelo próprio cônjuge da vítima (12,4%), utilizando da força física (29,3%), salienta-se que o álcool não estava presente na maior parte das agressões. Conclusão: Evidencia-se a prevalência de violência autoprovocada (53,6%), em adolescentes com ensino médio, brancas, sem companheiro, residentes da área urbana, agredidas em ambiente domiciliar, motivadas por conflitos geracionais, sendo as violências mais incidentes a física por meio de envenenamento/intoxicação. Diante do exposto é importante abordar o fato de que é necessário realizar capacitações com os profissionais de saúde referente a ficha de notificação e orientá-los da importância de preenchê-la de forma correta, para haja a tomada de providências de acordo com cada necessidade.


Introduction: Introduction: Violence against women is characterized especially by gender inequality, hierarchical difference, subordination and aggressiveness of the partner or ex partner. Among the main subtypes are physical, psychological, sexual, patrimonial and moral violence. With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 in an attempt to contain the disease, protective measures such as social isolation increased family coexistence. As a result, the victims of violence have been exposed to their aggressors for even longer and consequently find it more difficult to report the abuse they have suffered, since the provision of public services, security and judicial institutions have also been restricted. Objective: To characterize the cases of violence against women during the COVID-19 pandemic in a municipality in the southwest of Paraná. Materals and methods: This is a descriptive, documentary, and cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach carried out in a municipality in the Southwest of Paraná from data collection performed through the notification forms of violence against women notified between 2019 and 2021. Results and discussion: The study showed a prevalence of notifications in the year 2019 in women aged 12 to 18 years (27.2%), white (71.3%), with high school education (21.9%), being still students (23.1%) or unemployed (17.2%), without a partner (52.4%), residents of the urban area (74%), more specifically the Padre Ulrico neighborhood (12.4%), heterosexual (50.6%), without having any type of disability (51.8%). When checking the type of aggression with the highest incidence, we observed self-harm (53.6%) through intoxication/ poisoning (41.4%). As for interpersonal violence, it was noted that most aggressions were caused by the victim's own spouse (12.4%), using physical force (29.3%), and alcohol was not present in most aggressions. Conclusion: The prevalence of self- inflicted violence (53.6%) is evident in adolescents with high school education, white, without a partner, urban residents, assaulted in the home environment, motivated by generational conflicts, with the most incident violence being physical violence through poisoning/intoxication. Given the above, it is important to address the fact that it is necessary to conduct training with health professionals regarding the notification form and guide them on the importance of filling it out correctly, so that there is taking action according to each need.


Introducción: La violencia contra las mujeres se caracteriza especialmente por la desigualdad de género, la diferencia jerárquica, la subordinación y la agresividad de la pareja o ex pareja. Entre los principales subtipos, se menciona; la violencia física, psicológica, sexual, patrimonial y moral. Con la aparición de la pandemia de coronavirus en 2020 en un intento de contener la enfermedad, las medidas de protección como el aislamiento social han aumentado la convivencia familiar. Así, las víctimas de la violencia han quedado aún más expuestas a sus agresores y, en consecuencia, tienen mayores dificultades para denunciar los abusos sufridos, ya que también se ha restringido la prestación de servicios públicos, de seguridad y de instituciones judiciales. Objetivo: Caracterizar los casos de violencia contra la mujer en tiempos de pandemia de coronavirus en un municipio del sudoeste de Paraná. Materiales y métodos: Se trata de un estudio descriptivo, documental y transversal con enfoque cuantitativo realizado en un municipio del suroeste de Paraná a partir de la recolección de datos a través de las formas de notificación de la violencia contra las mujeres entre 2019 y 2021. Resultados y discusión: El estudio mostró una prevalencia de notificaciones en 2019 en mujeres de 12 a 18 años (27,2%), de raza blanca (71,3%), con estudios secundarios (21,9%), siendo aún estudiantes (23,1%) o desempleadas (17,2%), sin pareja (52,4%), residentes en el área urbana (74%), heterosexuales (50,6%), sin tener algún tipo de discapacidad (51,8%). Al verificar el tipo de agresión con mayor incidencia, se observó la lesión autoinfligida (53,6%) a través de la intoxicación / envenenamiento (41,4%). En cuanto a la violencia interpersonal, se observó que la mayoría de las agresiones fueron causadas por el propio cónyuge de la víctima (12,4%), utilizando la fuerza física (29,3%), se destaca que el alcohol no estuvo presente en la mayoría de las agresiones. Conclusión: Se evidencia la prevalencia de la violencia autoprovocada (53,6%), en adolescentes con educación médica, brancas, sin compañía, residentes del área urbana, agredidos en ambiente domiciliario, motivados por conflictos geracionales, siendo las violencias más incidentes a la física por medio de envenenamiento/intoxicación. Dado lo anterior es importante abordar el hecho de que es necesario realizar una capacitación con los profesionales de la salud respecto a la ficha de notificación y orientarlos sobre la importancia de llenarla correctamente, para que exista la toma de acciones de acuerdo a cada necesidad.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Adolescent , Adult , Health Profile , Violence Against Women , Pandemics , COVID-19 , Poisoning , Social Isolation , Women , Wounds and Injuries , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Health Personnel , Health Personnel/education , Crime Victims/statistics & numerical data , Notification/statistics & numerical data , Aggression/psychology , Professional Training , Physical Abuse/statistics & numerical data
11.
Lancet ; 400(10362): 1539-1556, 2022 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2159950

ABSTRACT

The education of health professionals substantially changed before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. A 2010 Lancet Commission examined the 100-year history of health-professional education, beginning with the 1910 Flexner report. Since the publication of the Lancet Commission, several transformative developments have happened, including in competency-based education, interprofessional education, and the large-scale application of information technology to education. Although the COVID-19 pandemic did not initiate these developments, it increased their implementation, and they are likely to have a long-term effect on health-professional education. They converge with other societal changes, such as globalisation of health care and increasing concerns of health disparities across the world, that were exacerbated by the pandemic. In this Health Policy, we list institutional and instructional reforms to assess what has happened to health-professional education since the publication of the Lancet Commission and how the COVID-19 pandemic altered the education process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education , Delivery of Health Care
12.
Wiad Lek ; 75(10): 2525-2530, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2156230

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: Defining the role of health workers and problems in combating the COVID-19 pandemic, outlining ways to protect health and safety in the workplace. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: The following methods were used: content analysis of international and domestic legal documents of state and sectoral level on the problem of functioning and social protection of medical and social workers in the COVID-19 pandemic and statistical reporting on the dynamics of their number and wages. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: With the advent of COVID-19, tensions in the work of medical staff have increased, which has contributed to a reduction in the number of health workers in Ukraine due to death, permanent disability, termination / change of professional activity and migration of medical personnel. It has been found that the slow growth of wages is inadequate to carry out socially necessary activities with a risk to life and health. Fair pay for health and social workers is a necessary but not sufficient component of measures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic at the present stage. The International Year of Health and Social Workers should be an opportunity to draw attention to the need to increase investment in education, training and social protection of these professionals and to minimize the risks posed by the pandemic to the economy and development of countries and people's lives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Workers , Ukraine , Health Personnel/education
13.
Healthc Pap ; 20(4): 57-61, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145321

ABSTRACT

Virtual care (VC) was rapidly introduced into mainstream health service delivery due to COVID-19. To maintain and integrate VC with in-person care, one important change management approach requires a holistic educational strategy for the health professions. Pratt's (1998) "five perspectives of teaching" is an effective framework to guide the development of VC education to holistically increase the knowledge and skills of health professionals and stimulate health system change through the Transmission, Apprenticeship, Developmental, Nurturing and Social Reform perspectives. This article then makes five recommendations to implement this strategy through purposeful involvement and collaborations between stakeholder organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Professional , Humans , Change Management , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e065930, 2022 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119468

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Interprofessional education is a relatively new addition to health professional education curricula in the Arab world. To understand current practice in this area, a scoping review will enable reporting of essential elements for the implementation of interprofessional education. The objective of this scoping review is to report on the implementation components, including presage, process and product, of interprofessional education in prelicensure health professions education programmes in the Arab world. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A comprehensive and systematic search for literature will be conducted using eight electronic databases from their inception to September 2022. A presearch was devised in PubMed, Scopus and CINAHL using a combination of terms related to population, context and concept. The Covidence Systematic Review tool will be used for blind screening, selection and conflict resolution. Data will be presented in tabular format and as a narrative synthesis and will include elements that support the implementation of interprofessional education. This review will be presented according to the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology.Studies conducted with students and/or faculty in prelicensure health professions education programmes will be included. The concept to be explored is interprofessional education. The context is the region commonly known as the Arab world, which includes 18 countries, sharing many common social and cultural traditions and where Arabic is the first language.Excluded will be studies conducted on collaborative practice of health professionals and postlicensure interprofessional education. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval was required. Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed articles.


Subject(s)
Arab World , Health Personnel , Interprofessional Education , Humans , Curriculum , Health Occupations , Health Personnel/education , Research Design
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e061482, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108280

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: A dearth of qualitative studies constrains in-depth understanding of health service providers' perspectives and experiences regarding the impact of COVID-19 on their mental health. This study explored the mental health impact and needs of of public sector healthcare workers during COVID-19 who working in secondary-level and tertiary-level healthcare settings of Pakistan. DESIGN: An exploratory qualitative study. SETTING: Twenty-five secondary-level and eight tertiary-level public hospitals of Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan. PARTICIPANTS: In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 health service providers and 40 administrative personnel. Study data were analysed on NVivo V.11 using the conventional content analysis technique. RESULTS: The study identified three overarching themes: (1) mental health impact of COVID-19 on health service providers that included the fear of acquiring the infection and transmitting it to their family members, fear of social isolation and stigma, anxiety related to the uncertainty of COVID-19, nervousness due to media exaggeration and stress associated with excessive workload; (2) mental health needs of health service providers involved in the COVID-19 crisis and available support from the healthcare system, including the expression of the need for counselling services and safe working conditions, the need for paid rest periods, and the need for appreciation and motivation to work in the pandemic; and (3) suggestions to address mental health needs of healthcare workers, including provision of specialised mental healthcare/services, formal training of health managers on managing mental health needs of health facility staff, and assessment and addressing of these needs of the health workforce. CONCLUSION: The study emphasises the need to strengthen health system preparedness for recognising and addressing the needs of healthcare professionals. At the system level, there is a need for a specialised unit to provide mental health services and better communication strategies. At the staff level, continuous motivation and appreciation should be given to healthcare professionals either through monetary incentives or formal acknowledgement of their performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pakistan/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Qualitative Research , Delivery of Health Care
16.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(6): 682-692, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107680

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Between April 2020 and May 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) awarded more than $40 billion to health departments nationwide for COVID-19 prevention and response activities. One of the identified priorities for this investment was improving infection prevention and control (IPC) in nursing homes. PROGRAM: CDC developed a virtual course to train new and less experienced public health staff in core healthcare IPC principles and in the application of CDC COVID-19 healthcare IPC guidance for nursing homes. IMPLEMENTATION: From October 2020 to August 2021, the CDC led training sessions for 12 cohorts of public health staff using pretraining reading materials, case-based scenarios, didactic presentations, peer-learning opportunities, and subject matter expert-led discussions. Multiple electronic assessments were distributed to learners over time to measure changes in self-reported knowledge and confidence and to collect feedback on the course. Participating public health programs were also assessed to measure overall course impact. EVALUATION: Among 182 enrolled learners, 94% completed the training. Most learners were infection preventionists (42%) or epidemiologists (38%), had less than 1 year of experience in their health department role (75%), and had less than 1 year of subject matter experience (54%). After training, learners reported increased knowledge and confidence in applying the CDC COVID-19 healthcare IPC guidance for nursing homes (≥81%) with the greatest increase in performing COVID-19 IPC consultations and assessments (87%). The majority of participating programs agreed that the course provided an overall benefit (88%) and reduced training burden (72%). DISCUSSION: The CDC's virtual course was effective in increasing public health capacity for COVID-19 healthcare IPC in nursing homes and provides a possible model to increase IPC capacity for other infectious diseases and other healthcare settings. Future virtual healthcare IPC courses could be enhanced by tailoring materials to health department needs, reinforcing training through applied learning experiences, and supporting mechanisms to retain trained staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Infection Control , Nursing Homes , Public Health
17.
Health Informatics J ; 28(4): 14604582221135431, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098247

ABSTRACT

This study assesses the perceived impact and benefits of Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes), a tele-mentoring intervention for health and social care providers, patients and the health system in Northern Ireland. Having access to a specialist, a space to share experiences, and being able to disseminate up-to-date best practice were all cited as improving provider knowledge as well as improving quality of care for patients. Healthcare providers reported being more confident in managing patients and that relationships had been improved between different levels of the health system. ECHO was described as improving access to education and training by removing geographic and time barriers. This is one of the first studies to qualitatively analyse impact across a number of different clinical and social care ECHO networks. The results strongly indicate the perceived benefit of ECHO in improving provider, patient and health system outcomes such as increased healthcare provider knowledge and confidence to manage patients at primary levels of the health system. This has implications for future service design, particularly within the context of COVID-19 in which virtual and online training is necessitated by social distancing requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Northern Ireland , Community Health Services , Social Support , Health Personnel/education
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066097

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the COVID-19 era, there was a call for the transformation of higher education. Universities had to combine non-face-to-face teaching with traditional procedures. This study analyzed the effectiveness and perceived satisfaction in a cohort of health sciences students of non-face-to-face teaching with passive training versus face-to-face teaching with active training in the proper donning and doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE) in a clinical simulation scenario. METHODS: A total of 142 participants were randomized into two groups: (a) non-face-to-face teaching with passive training; (b) face-to-face teaching with active training. The proper protocol for donning and doffing PPE was assessed. Students evaluated their skills before and after training and satisfaction with training received. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed for the statements "I felt more confident in donning after receiving this training" (p = 0.029) and "I felt more confident in doffing after receiving this training" (p = 0.042) in the face-to-face teaching with active training group compared to the non-face-to-face teaching with passive training group, whose number of tasks violated was significantly higher (p = 0.020). Satisfaction was significantly higher in the face-to-face and active training group (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Face-to-face teaching with active training improves effectiveness and satisfaction more than non-face-to-face teaching with passive training for acquiring skills in donning and doffing PPE properly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Students
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066032

ABSTRACT

Long COVID (LC) symptoms can be long standing, diverse and debilitating; comprehensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs are required to address this. A 10-week LC Virtual Rehabilitation Program (VRP) was developed to provide early education and self-management techniques to address the main symptoms of LC and was delivered to a group of persons with Long COVID (PwLC) online, facilitated by members of the multi-disciplinary rehabilitation team. This paper describes an evaluation of this VRP. Questionnaires completed by Healthcare Professionals (HCP) delivering the VRP were thematically analyzed to gain a priori themes and design semi-structured telephone interview questions for PwLC. Template analysis (TA) was used to analyze interview data. Routinely collected patient demographics and service data were also examined. Seventeen HCP survey responses were obtained and 38 PwLC telephone questionnaires were completed. The HCP interviews generated three a priori themes (1. Attendance and Availability, 2. Content, 3. Use of Digital Technology). TA was applied and three further themes emerged from the combined HCP and PwLC responses (4. Group Dynamics, 5. Individual Factors, 6. Internal Change). Key outcomes demonstrated that: the VRP was highly valued; digital delivery enabled self-management; barriers to attendance included work/life balance, use of technology, health inequalities; and LC was poorly understood by employers. Recommendations are provided for the design of VRPs for LC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Management , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 688, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the advent of COVID-19, many healthcare workers (HWs) in Australia requested access to powered air purifying respirators (PAPR) for improved respiratory protection, comfort and visibility. The urgency of the response at our hospital required rapid deployment of innovative training to ensure the safe use of PAPRs, in particular, a video-feedback training option to prepare HWs for PAPR competency. AIM: To explore the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of video-feedback in PAPR training and competency assessment. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 HWs, including clinicians from Intensive Care, Anaesthetics and Respiratory Medicine, at a large teaching hospital in Australia. FINDINGS: Participants believed that the use of video-feedback in PAPR training was feasible, acceptable and useful. They described a variety of benefits to learning and retention, from a variety of ways in which they engaged with the personal video-feedback. Participants also described the impact of reviewing personalised practice footage, compared to generic footage of an ideal performance. CONCLUSION: By conceptualising video-feedback using a pedagogical approach, this study contributes to knowledge around optimising methods for training HWs in PPE use, particularly when introducing a new and complex PPE device during an infectious disease outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Protective Devices , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feedback , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
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