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1.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E998-E1004, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Asian Canadians and Asian Americans face COVID-19-related discrimination. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of Asian health care workers dealing with discrimination, with a focus on racial micro-agressions, in Canada and the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We adopted a qualitative descriptive approach. We used convenience and snowball sampling strategies to recruit participants. We conducted individual, in-depth semistructured interviews with Asian health care workers in Canada and the US via videoconferencing between May and September 2020. Eligible participants had to self-identify as Asian and be currently employed as a health care worker with at least 1 year of full-time employment. We used an inductive thematic approach to analyze the data. RESULTS: Thirty participants were recruited. Fifteen (50%) were Canadians and 15 (50%) were Americans; there were 18 women (60%), 11 men (37%) and 1 nonbinary person. Most of the participants were aged 25-29 years (n = 16, 53%). More than half were nurses (n = 16, 53%); the other participants were attending physicians (n = 5), physiotherapists (n = 3), resident physicians (n = 2), a midwife, a paramedic, a pharmacist and a physician assistant. Two themes emerged from the data: a surge of racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 and a lack of institutional and public acknowledgement. Participants noted that they have experienced an increase in racial microaggressions during the COVID-19 pandemic. They have also experienced threats of violence and actual violence. The largely silent organizational response to the challenges being faced by people of Asian descent and the use of disparaging terms such as "China virus" in the early stages of the pandemic were a substantial source of frustration. INTERPRETATION: Asian health care workers have experienced challenges in dealing with racial microaggressions related to COVID-19 in the US and Canada. More research should be done on the experiences of Asian Americans and Asian Canadians, both during and after the pandemic, and supportive measures should be put in place to protect Asian health care workers.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Racism/psychology , Adult , Canada , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Workplace Violence/psychology , Xenophobia/psychology
2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1984049, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506934

ABSTRACT

Background: Frontline healthcare workers, recovered COVID+ patients who had severe illness, and close others of COVID+ patients who have recovered or died are at risk for clinical levels of mental health symptoms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESTORE (Recovering from Extreme Stressors Through Online Resources and E-health) was specifically designed for this context. RESTORE is a transdiagnostic guided online intervention adapted from evidence-based cognitive-behavioural therapies. Objectives: RESTORE was designed to address depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms associated with exposure to COVID-19-related traumatic and extreme stressors, and to overcome multiple barriers to accessing psychotherapies. Method: This paper describes the intervention components and platform, as well as the principles used to develop RESTORE. Current research and future directions in developing and testing RESTORE are outlined. Results: Preliminary data from an initial uncontrolled trial evaluating RESTORE in frontline healthcare workers is highly promising. Conclusion: We believe RESTORE has great potential to provide accessible, evidence-based psychological intervention to those in great need.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Depression/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
4.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 159, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the COVID-19 pandemic context, a massive shortage of personal protective equipment occurred. To increase the available stocks, several countries appealed for donations from individuals or industries. While national and international standards to evaluate personal protective equipment exist, none of the previous research studied how to evaluate personal protective equipment coming from donations to healthcare establishments. Our aim was to evaluate the quality and possible use of the personal protective equipment donations delivered to our health care establishment in order to avoid a shortage and to protect health care workers throughout the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: Our intervention focused on evaluation of the quality of donations for medical use through creation of a set of assessment criteria and analysis of the economic impact of these donations. RESULTS: Between 20th March 2020 and 11th May 2020, we received 239 donations including respirators, gloves, coveralls, face masks, gowns, hats, overshoes, alcohol-based hand rubs, face shields, goggles and aprons. A total of 448,666 (86.3%) products out of the 519,618 initially received were validated and distributed in health care units, equivalent to 126 (52.7%) donations out of the 239 received. The budgetary value of the validated donations was 32,872 euros according to the pre COVID-19 prices and 122,178 euros according to the current COVID-19 prices, representing an increase of 371.7%. CONCLUSIONS: By ensuring a constant influx of personal protective equipment and proper stock management, shortages were avoided. Procurement and distribution of controlled and validated personal protective equipment is the key to providing quality care while guaranteeing health care worker safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Health Personnel/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Masks/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Protective Clothing/supply & distribution , Safety Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Protective Clothing/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 543-545, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504076

ABSTRACT

Sufficient sleep is vital to the health and safety of healthcare workers and patients alike. Despite this, formal sleep promotion programs rarely exist within healthcare. Guidance does exist for how to incorporate strategies within healthcare organizations. Nurse leaders can spearhead efforts by promoting healthy sleep and instituting change through scheduling practices, unit policies, and supporting staff when barriers to healthy sleep develop.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Organizational Innovation , Sleep/physiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Culture
8.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496532

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers have had the longest and most direct exposure to COVID-19 and consequently may suffer from poor mental health. We conducted one of the first repeated multi-country analysis of the mental wellbeing of medical doctors (n = 5,275) at two timepoints during the COVID-19 pandemic (June 2020 and November/December 2020) to understand the prevalence of anxiety and depression, as well as associated risk factors. Rates of anxiety and depression were highest in Italy (24.6% and 20.1%, June 2020), second highest in Catalonia (15.9% and 17.4%, June 2020), and lowest in the UK (11.7% and 13.7%, June 2020). Across all countries, higher risk of anxiety and depression symptoms were found among women, individuals below 60 years old, those feeling vulnerable/exposed at work, and those reporting normal/below-normal health. We did not find systematic differences in mental health measures between the two rounds of data collection, hence we cannot discard that the mental health repercussions of the pandemic are persistent.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
9.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258662, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496511

ABSTRACT

We aimed to apply the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model to increase effectiveness and sustainability of the World Health Organization's (WHOs) hand hygiene (HH) guidelines within healthcare systems. Our cross-sectional, mixed-methods study took place at Jimma University Medical Center (JUMC), a tertiary care hospital in Jimma, Ethiopia, between November 2018 and August 2020 and consisted of three phases: baseline assessment, intervention, and follow-up assessment. We conducted questionnaires addressing HH knowledge and attitudes, interviews to identify HH barriers and facilitators within the SEIPS framework, and observations at the WHO's 5 moments of HH amongst healthcare workers (HCWs) at JUMC. We then implemented HH interventions based on WHO guidelines and results from our baseline assessment. Follow-up HH observations were conducted months later during the Covid-19 pandemic. 250 HCWs completed questionnaires with an average knowledge score of 61.4% and attitude scores indicating agreement that HH promotes patient safety. Interview participants cited multiple barriers to HH including shortages and location of HH materials, inadequate training, minimal Infection Prevention Control team presence, and high workload. We found an overall baseline HH compliance rate of 9.4% and a follow-up compliance rate of 72.1%. Drastically higher follow-up compared to baseline compliance rates were likely impacted by our HH interventions and Covid-19. HCWs showed motivation for patient safety despite low HH knowledge. Utilizing the SEIPS model helped identify institution-specific barriers that informed targeted interventions beyond WHO guidelines aimed at increasing effectiveness and sustainability of HH efforts.


Subject(s)
Hand Disinfection/methods , Hand Disinfection/trends , Hand Hygiene/methods , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia , Female , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Hand Hygiene/trends , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers
10.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 1267-1276, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484979

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to investigate how the psychological health of health care professionals (HCP) on COVID duty was different from those who were not directly in contact. Methodology: Of 473 (76%) randomly selected respondents (doctors and nurses) to a WhatsApp request message, 450 subjects' data were finally analyzed. Result: The prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression among HCP was 33.8, 38.9 and 43.6%, respectively. Compared with nonexposed professionals, COVID-19-exposed professionals had roughly double the score of these morbidities (t = 6.3, p < 0.001; t = 6.9, p < 0.001; t = 6.0, p < 0.001). Most worry (71.11%) was about the health of their family, followed by themselves (35.55%). Conclusion: The level of exposure, feelings of uncertainty and fear of infection emerged in our study as possible risk factors for psychological morbidities among HCP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Online Systems , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 554-560, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483691

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the predictors associated with severe burnout and poor mental health among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic as a learning opportunity for future emergent situations. BACKGROUND: Modifiable predictors of mental health need to be further examined and quantified to prioritize human resource support in organizations as healthcare workers confront stressful situations. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 271 healthcare workers from September 8 to October 10, 2020. RESULTS: Approximately one-third reported severe burnout, as well as moderate/severe anxiety and depression. Feeling protected working with COVID-19 patients, high family functioning, and spirituality were associated with 2- to 4-fold lower odds of severe burnout. Satisfaction with the organization's communications predicted 2-fold lower odds of anxiety, whereas high resilience was associated with almost 4-fold lower odds of stress and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare organizations may consider adopting programs to foster resilience, family and spiritual support, and effective communication strategies to reduce burnout and poor mental health among healthcare workers during pandemics and other situations of high stress.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Emergencies , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Stress, Psychological/psychology
12.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
13.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 304-322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475893

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: While the COVID-19 pandemic has added stressors to the lives of healthcare workers, it is unclear which factors represent the most useful targets for interventions to mitigate employee distress across the entire healthcare team. A survey was distributed to employees of a large healthcare system in the Southeastern United States, and 1,130 respondents participated. The survey measured overall distress using the 9-item Well-Being Index (WBI), work-related factors, moral distress, resilience, and organizational-level factors. Respondents were also asked to identify major work, clinical, and nonwork stressors. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate associations between employee characteristics and WBI distress score. Overall, 82% of employees reported high distress (WBI ≥ 2), with nurses, clinical support staff, and advanced practice providers reporting the highest average scores. Factors associated with higher distress included increased job demands or responsibilities, heavy workload or long hours, higher frequency of moral distress, and loneliness or social isolation. Factors associated with lower distress were perceived organizational support, work control, perceived fairness of salary cuts, and resilience. Most factors significantly associated with distress-heavy workloads and long hours, increased job demands, and moral distress, in particular-were work-related, indicating that efforts can be made to mitigate them. Resilience explained a small portion of the variance in distress relative to other work-related factors. Ensuring appropriate staffing levels may represent the single largest opportunity to significantly move the needle on distress. However, the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the healthcare system may represent a barrier to addressing these stressors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress , Patient Care Team , Stress, Psychological , Workload/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/statistics & numerical data
14.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1968141, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475710

ABSTRACT

The no-visitor policies endorsed by healthcare organizations to limit COVID-19 virus risk exposure have unfortunately contributed to the isolation of patients further exacerbating distress in relatives and frontline healthcare workers. To contrast such effects, many healthcare institutions have adopted technology-based solutions helping patients and families communicate online through the aid of virtual devices. To date, no study has investigated whether facilitating patient-family videocalls would mitigate distress levels in frontline healthcare professionals. Caring for emotional needs of patients by re-establishing affiliative connections interrupted by the pandemic through patient-family videocalls is expected to mitigate distress in engaged healthcare workers as an example of a tend-and-befriend response to stress caused by the pandemic. We tested this hypothesis in a cross-sectional study conducted during 1-30 June 2020, involving 209 healthcare workers (nurses = 146; physicians = 63) engaged in the COVID-19 frontline in Italy. Half of participants in our sample (n = 107) had assisted efforts aimed at connecting patients remotely with families through videocalls. Psychological distress measures included symptoms of burnout, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, depression, and difficulty in sleep and wakefulness. Partially in line with our expectations we found a modulation effect specific for professional category: nurses assisting patient-family videocalls reported significantly lower levels of distress and a better quality of wakefulness compared to those who did not, whereas physicians reported higher levels of distress during such virtual communications. We interpret these findings from the perspective of patient-family communication and differences in skills and training between nurses and physicians. These findings highlight that technology-based solutions aimed at reducing barriers and alleviating distress in healthcare settings should be promoted in concert with skill enhancement training for healthcare professionals especially in terms of communicating online and communicating difficult topics with patients and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Family/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Inpatients/psychology , Psychological Distress , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Technology
15.
J Perioper Pract ; 30(6): 151, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477003
17.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 283, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472501

ABSTRACT

Self-denial and sense of duty are fundamental ethical principles in health care. Since the outbreak of health crisis, healthcare workers have been the first bulwark against the spread of coronavirus, and therefore, the occupational category at higher risk of contamination. In this regard, in a statement dated 23 March 2020, the World Health Organization published a guidance regarding the management of the disease caused by Covid-19 in health workers, but also in workers employed in all sectors exposed to the risk of contamination. In Morocco, the Ministry of Health published on April 6, on its official website, a condolence message to the families of the first two doctors died following contraction of coronavirus, while specifying that coronavirus infection was not due to the exercise of their professional functions. The Minister of Labor and Professional Integration recently appointed an internal committee to undertake a reflection on this issue. At present, given Morocco's law, what are the chances to categorize coronavirus as an occupational disease?


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Morocco/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Rehabil Med ; 53(9): jrm00228, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470733

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe adaptations in the provision of rehabilitation services proposed by scientific and professional rehabilitation organizations to avoid interruptions to patients rehabilitation process and delays in starting rehabilitation in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A narrative review approach was used to identify the recommendations of scientific and professional organizations in the area of rehabilitation. A systematic search was performed in the main data-bases in 78 international and regional web portals of rehabilitation organizations. A total of 21 publications from these organizations were identified and selected. RESULTS: The results are presented in 4 categories: adequacy of inpatient services, including acute care services and intensive care unit for patients with and without COVID-19; adequacy of outpatient services, including home-based rehabilitation and tele-rehabilitation; recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19; and regulatory standards and positions during the COVID-19 pandemic expressed by organizations for protecting the rights of health workers and patients. CONCLUSION: Health systems around the world are rapidly learning from actions aimed at the reorganization of rehabilitation services for patients who are in the process of recovery from acute or chronic conditions, and the rapid response to the rehabilitation of survivors of COVID-19, as well as from efforts in the prevention of contagion of those providing the services.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/methods , Rehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors
19.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258475, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468176

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The spread of COVID-19 into a global pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of frontline healthcare-workers. This study is a multi-centre, cross-sectional epidemiological study that uses nationwide data to assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression and burnout among health care workers managing COVID-19 patients in Cyprus. The study also investigates the mechanism behind the manifestation of these pathologies, as to allow for the design of more effective protective measures. METHODS: Data on the mental health status of the healthcare workers were collected from healthcare professionals from all over the nation, who worked directly with Covid patients. This was done via the use of 64-item, self-administered questionnaire, which was comprised of the DASS21 questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and a number of original questions. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate factors associated with each of the mental health measures. RESULTS: The sample population was comprised of 381 healthcare professionals, out of which 72.7% were nursing staff, 12.9% were medical doctors and 14.4% belonged to other occupations. The prevalence of anxiety, stress and depression among the sample population were 28.6%, 18.11% and 15% respectively. The prevalence of burnout was 12.3%. This was in parallel with several changes in the lives of the healthcare professionals, including; working longer hours, spending time in isolation and being separated from family. DISCUSSION: This study indicates that the mental health of a significant portion of the nation's workforce is compromised and, therefore, highlights the need for an urgent intervention particularly since many countries, including Cyprus, are suffering a second wave of the pandemic. The identified risk factors should offer guidance for employers aiming to protect their frontline healthcare workers from the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cyprus/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257983, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468164

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic is having a devastating effect on the mental health and wellbeing of healthcare providers (HCPs) globally. This review is aimed at determining the prevalence of depression, anxiety, stress, fear, burnout and resilience and its associated factors among HCPs in Asia during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed literature search using 4 databases from Medline, Cinahl, PubMed and Scopus from inception up to March 15, 2021 and selected relevant cross-sectional studies. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plot. Random effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence while risk factors were reported in odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI. RESULTS: We included 148 studies with 159,194 HCPs and the pooled prevalence for depression was 37.5% (95%CI: 33.8-41.3), anxiety 39.7(95%CI: 34.3-45.1), stress 36.4% (95%CI: 23.2-49.7), fear 71.3% (95%CI: 54.6-88.0), burnout 68.3% (95%CI: 54.0-82.5), and low resilience was 16.1% (95%CI: 12.8-19.4), respectively. The heterogeneity was high (I2>99.4%). Meta-analysis reported that both females (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.30-1.68) and nurses (OR = 1.21; 95%CI = 1.02-1.45) were at increased risk of having depression and anxiety [(Female: OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.49-1.85), (Nurse: OR = 1.36; 95%CI = 1.16-1.58)]. Females were at increased risk of getting stress (OR = 1.59; 95%CI = 1.28-1.97). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, one third of HCPs suffered from depression, anxiety and stress and more than two third of HCPs suffered from fear and burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic in Asia.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Psychological Distress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
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