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1.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 682, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108753

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented physical and mental burden on healthcare workers who are frequently at high risk of infection, particularly in low-income countries. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of anxiety, depression, and stress, as well as changes in daily and occupational activities among healthcare professionals due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Colombia. METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted between February and June 2021. The survey incorporated validated mental health tools such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Perceived Stress Scale-10. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors associated with severe mental health outcomes. RESULTS: Among 1345 healthcare workers the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress were 75.61, 59.18, and 53.09%, respectively. Anxiety (OR:1.44; 95%CI:1.16-1.8), depression (OR:1.74; 95%CI:1.27-2.37), and stress (OR:1.51; 95%CI:1.18-1.94) were more frequent in women, and individuals who expressed fear of a negative outcome (death, sequelae) (OR:2.25; 95%CI:1.60-3.25), (OR:1.49; 95%CI:1.03-2.16) and (OR:2.36; 95%CI:1.69-3.29) respectively. Age was negatively associated with anxiety (OR:0.98; 95%CI:0.98-0.99), stress (OR:0.98; 95%CI:0.97-0.99), and depression (OR:0.97; 95% CI:0.96-0.98). Reduction in consultations and surgeries (OR:1.01; 95%CI:1.0-1.01) was positively associated with anxiety. Due to the pandemic, most specialists expected to incorporate drastic long-term (> 1 year) changes in their clinical setting and daily activities. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress is higher among Colombian healthcare workers compared to previous reports. Further research regarding these psychological outcomes is needed to achieve early mental health intervention strategies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Hospital Universitario Fundación Santa Fe, Ethical Committee Registration ID: CCEI-12992-2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Colombia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology
2.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(11): 934-941, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine to what extent did health care workers experience the pandemic as a severe stress event. METHODS: This cross-sectional evaluation of 8299 health care workers, representing a 22% response rate, utilized machine learning to predict high levels of escalating stress based on demographics and known predictors for adverse psychological outcomes after trauma. RESULTS: A third of health care workers experienced the pandemic as a potentially traumatic stress event; a greater proportion of health care workers experienced high levels of escalating stress. Predictive factors included sense of control, ability to manage work-life demands, guilt or shame, age, and level of education. Gender was no longer predictive after controlling for other factors. Escalating stress was especially high among nonclinical academics and clinical private practitioners. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest adverse effects on total worker health, care quality, professionalism, retention, and acute and chronic mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Self-Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology
3.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 23: e67, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106285

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly around the world since the initial outbreak in Wuhan, China. With the emergence of the Omicron variant, South Africa is presently the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Healthcare workers have been at the forefront of the pandemic in terms of screening, early detection and clinical management of suspected and confirmed COVID-19 cases. Since the beginning of the outbreak, little has been reported on how healthcare workers have experienced the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, particularly within a low-income, rural primary care context. METHODS: The purpose of the present qualitative study design was to explore primary healthcare practitioners' experiences regarding the COVID-19 pandemic at two selected primary healthcare facilities within a low-income rural context in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Data were collected from a purposive sample of 15 participants, which consisted of nurses, physiotherapists, pharmacists, community caregivers, social workers and clinical associates. The participants were both men and women who were all above the age of 20. Data were collected through individual, in-depth face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed manually by thematic analysis following Tech's steps of data analysis. RESULTS: Participants reported personal, occupational and community-related experiences related to the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. Personal experiences of COVID-19 yielded superordinate themes of psychological distress, self-stigma, disruption of the social norm, Epiphany and conflict of interest. Occupational experiences yielded superordinate themes of staff infections, COVID-19-related courtesy stigma, resource constraints and poor dissemination of information. Community-related experiences were related to struggles with societal issues, clinician-patient relations and COVID-19 mismanagement of patients. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that primary healthcare practitioners' experiences around COVID-19 are attributed to the catastrophic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with the multitude of psychosocial consequences forming the essence of these experiences. Ensuring availability of reliable sources of information regarding the pandemic as well as psychosocial support could be valuable in helping healthcare workers cope with living and working during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Male , Humans , Female , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , South Africa/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Qualitative Research , Primary Health Care
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e064893, 2022 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2103194

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore adolescents' and professionals' incentives and experiences of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) and to explore perceived needs and requirements for preoperative and postoperative support through an mHealth intervention to improve long-term healthy lifestyle behaviour and health outcomes. DESIGN: An inductive qualitative study using in-depth semistructured interviews. SETTING: Three hospital-based specialist paediatric obesity treatment units in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 18 participants (14 women and 4 men). Nine adolescents aged between 17 and 22 years who had undergone or were about to undergo surgery, and nine professionals, including researchers and clinicians working in various professional roles such as physiotherapist, dietician, nurse, psychologist, physician and pedagogue. RESULTS: Both informant groups of participants highlighted that undergoing MBS is a complex process, and hence actions are required on several levels to optimise the positive, long-term effects of surgery. Efficient communication between the healthcare professionals and adolescents was considered crucial and a key success factor. Informants acknowledged the need for additional support that relates to psychosocial well-being and mental health in order to understand, form and accept new behaviours and identity. An mHealth intervention should be seen as complementary to physical appointments, and informants acknowledged that an app could be a way of improving access to healthcare, and a useful tool to allow for individually tailored and easily available support. CONCLUSIONS: The findings address the importance of a personal encounter and a need for additional support that relates to psychosocial well-being, mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviour. These findings should be incorporated into future research concerning mHealth interventions in MBS during adolescence.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Telemedicine , Male , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Qualitative Research , Bariatric Surgery/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Delivery of Health Care
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e061317, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2103192

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pandemics negatively impact healthcare workers' (HCW's) mental health and well-being causing additional feelings of anxiety, depression, moral distress and post-traumatic stress. A comprehensive review and evidence synthesis of HCW's mental health and well-being interventions through pandemics reporting mental health outcomes was conducted addressing two questions: (1) What mental health support interventions have been reported in recent pandemics, and have they been effective in improving the mental health and well-being of HCWs? (2) Have any mobile apps been designed and implemented to support HCWs' mental health and well-being during pandemics? DESIGN: A narrative evidence synthesis was conducted using Cochrane criteria for synthesising and presenting findings when systematic review and pooling data for statistical analysis are not suitable due to the heterogeneity of the studies. DATA SOURCES: Evidence summary resources, bibliographic databases, grey literature sources, clinical trial registries and protocol registries were searched. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Subject heading terms and keywords covering three key concepts were searched: SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus (or similar infectious diseases) epidemics, health workforce and mental health support interventions. Searches were limited to English-language items published from 1 January 2000 to 14 June 2022. No publication-type limit was used. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two authors determined eligibility and extracted data from identified manuscripts. Data was synthesised into tables and refined by coauthors. RESULTS: 2694 studies were identified and 27 papers were included. Interventions were directed at individuals and/or organisations and most were COVID-19 focused. Interventions had some positive impacts on HCW's mental health and well-being, but variable study quality, low sample sizes and lack of control conditions were limitations. Two mobile apps were identified with mixed outcomes. CONCLUSION: HCW interventions were rapidly designed and implemented with few comprehensively described or evaluated. Tailored interventions that respond to HCWs' needs using experience co-design for mental health and well-being are required with process and outcome evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals
6.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277062, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098773

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Psychological First Aid is a brief intervention based on international guidance from the World Health Organisation. Free to access online training in the intervention was introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic in UK. We aimed to determine the uptake of Psychological First Aid training among healthcare workers in care homes in the UK and to assess its effects on their wellbeing. DESIGN: This was a sequential mixed methods design. METHODS: Healthcare workers (nurses and carers) working in care homes in the UK were surveyed about their uptake of Psychological First Aid, their stress, coping efficacy and the key concepts of Psychological First Aid (safety, calmness, hopefulness, connectedness, and accomplishment). Those that completed the Psychological First Aid training were asked to share their experiences via qualitative survey. Data collection was conducted between June and October 2021. Analyses included descriptive statistics and regression analysis. A six step thematic analysis was used to interpret the qualitative data. RESULTS: 388 participants responded to the survey. The uptake of Psychological First Aid training was 37 (9.5%). Psychological first aid was a significant predictor for coping efficacy (ß = 17.54, p = .001). Participants with a physical or mental health condition experienced higher stress and lower coping regardless of PFA training. Four themes were identified from the qualitative analysis: self-awareness and growth, relationships with others, overcoming stress and accessibility. CONCLUSION: While this study suggests some benefits to healthcare workers in care home settings undergoing PFA the poor uptake of the training warrants further investigation. IMPACT: Care home staff need psychological support. This gap remains as few completed PFA training. This is the first study in UK and worldwide to look at the effects of psychological first aid on stress and coping in this population and it warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Psychological First Aid , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Homes , United Kingdom
7.
Nurs Res ; 71(6): 421-431, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097526

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing professional organizations and media sources indicated early in the pandemic that the physical and psychological effects of COVID-19 might be distinct and possibly greater in nurses than in other types of healthcare workers (HCWs). OBJECTIVES: Based on survey data collected in Healthcare Worker Exposure Response and Outcomes (HERO), a national registry of U.S. HCWs, this study compared the self-reported experiences of nurses with other HCWs during the first 13 months of the pandemic. METHODS: Nurse responses were compared to responses of nonnurse HCWs in terms of viral exposure, testing and infection, access to personal protective equipment (PPE), burnout, and well-being. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between nurse and nonnurse roles for the binary end points of viral testing and test positivity for COVID-19. We also examined differences by race/ethnicity and high-risk versus low-risk practice settings. RESULTS: Of 24,343 HCWs in the registry, one third self-identified as nurses. Nurses were more likely than other HCWs to report exposure to SARS-CoV-2, problems accessing PPE, and decreased personal well-being, including burnout, feeling tired, stress, trouble sleeping, and worry. In adjusted models, nurses were more likely than nonnurse HCWs to report viral testing and test positivity for COVID-19 infection. Nurses in high-risk settings were more likely to report viral exposure and symptoms related to well-being; nurses in low-risk settings were more likely to report viral testing and test positivity. Black or Hispanic nurses were most likely to report test positivity. DISCUSSION: Differences were identified between nurses and nonnurse HCWs in access to PPE, physical and mental well-being measures, and likelihood of reporting exposure and infection. Among nurses, testing and infection differed based on race and ethnicity, and type of work setting. Our findings suggest further research and policy are needed to elucidate and address social and occupational disparities.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Registries
8.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(4): 388-391, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096421

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Presenteeism is an expensive and challenging problem in the healthcare industry. In anticipation of the staffing challenges expected with the COVID-19 pandemic, we examined a decade of payroll data for a healthcare workforce. We aimed to determine the effect of seasonal influenza-like illness (ILI) on absences to support COVID-19 staffing plans. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Large academic medical center in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Employees of the academic medical center who were on payroll between the years of 2009 and 2019. METHODS: Biweekly institutional payroll data was evaluated for unscheduled absences as a marker for acute illness-related work absences. Linear regression models, stratified by payroll status (salaried vs hourly employees) were developed for unscheduled absences as a function of local ILI. RESULTS: Both hours worked and unscheduled absences were significantly related to the community prevalence of influenza-like illness in our cohort. These effects were stronger in hourly employees. CONCLUSIONS: Organizations should target their messaging at encouraging salaried staff to stay home when ill.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Workforce , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Minnesota/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
9.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(4): 490-491, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096350
11.
Acta Biomed ; 93(5): e2022308, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The healthcare workers, mostly in emergency departments, are exposed to emotionally strong situations that can lead to psychological trauma. Often those who experience the "second victim" phenomenon find comfort in dealing with Peers that can help to understand emotions and normalize lived experiences. A scoping review was conducted to clarify the key concepts available in the literature and understand Peer Support characteristics and methods of implementation.  Methods. Scoping review J.B.I. approach was used. The reviewers analyzed the last twenty-one years of literature and extracted data from relevant studies.  Results. The research revealed 49 articles that discuss Peer Support in the healthcare system. Often articles involve healthcare workers without work area and role distinctions. 56% of the articles have been published in the last two years and the Anglo-Saxon countries are the main geographical area of ​​origin (82%). Peer support emerges as a preclinical psychological support for people involved in tiring situations. It's based on mutual respect and on voluntary and not prejudicial help. Peers are trained to guide the support relationship and identify the signs of possible pathologies. Peer Support can be proposed as one to one/group peer support, or through online platforms.  Conclusion. It can be said that Peer Support programs had an important development in the years of the Covid 19 pandemic. Many of the studies affirm that the personnel involved have benefited from the programs available. It is necessary to carry out further research to determine the pre and post intervention benefits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Health Personnel/psychology , Peer Group , Delivery of Health Care , Hospitals
12.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604553, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089970

ABSTRACT

Objective: To characterize the evolution of healthcare workers' mental health status over the 1-year period following the initial COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and to examine baseline characteristics associated with resolution or persistence of mental health problems over time. Methods: We conducted an 8-month follow-up cohort study. Eligible participants were healthcare workers working in Spain. Baseline data were collected during the initial pandemic outbreak. Survey-based self-reported measures included COVID-19-related exposures, sociodemographic characteristics, and three mental health outcomes (psychological distress, depression symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms). We examined three longitudinal trajectories in mental health outcomes between baseline and follow-up assessments (namely asymptomatic/stable, recovering, and persistently symptomatic/worsening). Results: We recruited 1,807 participants. Between baseline and follow-up assessments, the proportion of respondents screening positive for psychological distress and probable depression decreased, respectively, from 74% to 56% and from 28% to 21%. Two-thirds remained asymptomatic/stable in terms of depression symptoms and 56% remained symptomatic or worsened over time in terms of psychological distress. Conclusion: Poor mental health outcomes among healthcare workers persisted over time. Occupational programs and mental health strategies should be put in place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276535, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the psychological impact on, coping behaviors of, and traumatic stress experienced by healthcare workers during the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic and formulated effective support strategies that can be implemented by hospitals and government policymakers to help healthcare staff overcome the pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study recruited clinical healthcare workers at a regional hospital in Nantou County, Taiwan. The questionnaire collected personal characteristics, data on the impact and coping behaviors of the pandemic, and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). A total of 354 valid questionnaires were collected. The statistical methods employed were univariate and multivariate stepwise regression, and logistic regression. RESULTS: Perceived impact and coping behaviors were found to be moderate in degree, and traumatic stress was lower than that in other countries. However, our data identified the following subgroups that require special attention: those with young age, those living with minor children, nurses, those with self-rated poor mental health, and those with insufficient COVID-19-related training. CONCLUSION: Managers should pay particular attention to helping healthcare workers in high-risk groups, strengthen COVID-19 training, provide adequate protective equipment and shelter, and offer psychological counseling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Taiwan/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Health Personnel/psychology
14.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276455, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are highly vulnerable to compassion fatigue (CF), which not only leads to decreased mental and physical health, but also to deterioration in the safety of care delivered. Our study aims to measure compassion satisfaction (CS), CF levels and their predictors among Tunisian HCWs. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study among HCWs caring for confirmed and suspected Covid-19 patients, staff at two university hospitals in Sousse, Tunisia during the 4thwave of coronavirus through a self-administrated Questionnaire, using the French version of the Professional Quality of Life scale ProQol, version 5. RESULTS: A total of 274 professionals were recruited with a mean age of 32.87±8.35 years. HCWs tend to have an overall moderate levels of compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress and burnout with mean scores 35.09±7.08, 29.72±7.62, 28.54±5.44 respectively. Self-reported resilience (ß = 0.14, p = 10-3), work engagement (ß = 0.39, p = 10-3) and burnout (ß = -0.32, p = 10-3) were the predictors of compassion satisfaction in the linear regression analysis (adjusted r2 = 0.45). Similarly, limited work experience, compassion satisfaction and secondary traumatic sub-scores were the determinants of burnout (ß = -0.1, p = 0.04; ß = -0.54, p = 10-3; ß = 0.35, p = 10-3 respectively); (adjusted r2 = 0.48). Regarding STS, female professionals (ß = 0.20, p = 10-3), being married (ß = 0.19, p = 10-3), the fear of transmitting the infection (ß = 0.11, p = 0.03) and burnout (ß = 0.39, p = 10-3) were the predictors for the occurrence of secondary traumatic stress (adjusted r2 = 0.48). CONCLUSION: More resilience promoting interventions and more coping skills programs must be implemented to fulfill HCWs' psychological well-being needs.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quality of Life , Tunisia/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Empathy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
15.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 664, 2022 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089178

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mental health of healthcare workers (HCWs) has been at the forefront throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. While workplace-based support programs have been developed in hospitals globally, few systematically collected data. While critical to their success, information on these programs and the experience of mental healthcare providers (MHP) who support colleagues is limited. The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of MHP caring for HCW colleagues within a novel workplace-based mental health support program during the COVID-19 pandemic, to provide insights on facilitators, areas for improvement and barriers to program sustainability. METHODS: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews conducted by videoconference between September 2020 to October 2021. UHN CARES (University Health Network Coping and Resilience for Employees and Staff) Program was developed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. It supports over 21,000 staff members within the UHN, Canada's largest academic health research institution, in Toronto, Canada. Purposive sampling was used to select 10 of the 22 MHP in the UHN CARES Program (n = 10). Using a critical realism framework, key components required to sustain a successful workplace-based mental health support program for HCWs and balance the needs of MHP were determined. RESULTS: Six psychiatrists and four psychologists (n = 10) with varying roles at UHN participated in 17 interviews, including seven repeat interviews exploring changes over time within the pandemic and program. Components which facilitated the success of the program included flexibility in scheduling, confidential health record storage, comprehensive administrative support, availability of resources and adaptive quality improvement approach. Recommendations for improvement included opportunities for peer supervision, triaging of cases, and managing HCW expectations. MHP found caring for HCWs to be meaningful and they utilized existing clinical skills during sessions. Challenges included working in a virtual setting, navigating boundaries when caring for colleagues, and managing the range of service users and their needs. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest how support programs can be structured for HCWs, how to provide support, and how to sustain this support, allowing health systems to balance the needs of HCWs and MHPs in preparation for future public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Emergencies , Health Personnel/psychology
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e059879, 2022 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088804

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the physical and mental health problems of front-line healthcare workers fighting COVID-19 across the three phases of the epidemic rescue mission (before, during and after) in China. DESIGN: A qualitative study was adopted using face to face, in-depth semistructured interviews. Phenomenological research methods and Colaizzi's seven-step analysis method were used in the study. SETTING: The setting of the study was the offices of healthcare workers in 12 tertiary hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-one front-line healthcare workers from 16 provinces in China, who carried out rescue missions in Hubei Province, were interviewed from October to November 2020. RESULTS: Physical and mental health problems existed before, during and after the COVID-19 rescue mission. Eleven themes emerged during the three phases. Two themes appeared before rescue mission: basic diseases, anxiety before rescue mission. Five themes appeared during rescue mission: basic physical function disorder, physical exhaustion, negative cognition, negative emotions and negative behaviour. Four themes appeared after rescue mission: physical dysfunction, negative emotions, stigmatisation and hypochondriasis. CONCLUSION: Both physical and mental health problems occurred throughout the three phases. The study results pointed that a comprehensive prevention and control system that addresses both physical and mental health problems of front-line healthcare workers throughout the three phases of epidemic rescue mission (before, during and after), and that involves themselves, their families, hospitals, the government and social organisations is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Health Personnel/psychology , Qualitative Research
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(42): e31316, 2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087902

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a heavily burden on healthcare workers (HCWs) worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare differences in psychological and social impact between two waves of the pandemic among first- and second-line HCWs in Taiwan. The current study derived data from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2020 and 2021. Levels of depression, sleep disturbance, psychological distress, social impact, and demographic variables were collected through self-reported questionnaires. The independent t test was used to compare differences in scores between the first and second wave of the pandemic. Differences between first- and second-line HCWs were also analyzed. A total of 711 HCWs in the first wave and 560 HCWs in the second wave were recruited. For the first- and second-line HCWs, the social impact during the second wave was higher than during the first wave, and they expressed a higher intention to maintain social distancing and were more aware of the pandemic overseas in the second wave. The first-line HCWs had a trend of worse sleep quality during the second wave. In addition, sleep quality was worse in the first-line HCWs than in the second-line HCWs during both waves. The second-line HCWs expressed a greater desire to seek COVID-19-related information than the first-line HCWs during the first wave, and more intended to maintain social distancing during the second wave. Our results show the importance of evaluating the social and mental health burden of HCWs, and especially first-line workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Taiwan/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology
18.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 686-694, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087888

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to describe the extent of psychological trauma and moral distress in healthcare workers (HCW) working in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we review reports on prevalence of mental health symptoms, highlight vulnerable populations and summarize modifiable risk factors associated with mental health symptoms in ICU HCW. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has resulted in a multitude of closely intertwined professional and personal challenges for ICU HCW. High rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (14-47%), burnout (45-85%), anxiety (31-60%), and depression (16-65%) have been reported, and these mental health symptoms are often interrelated. Most studies suggest that nurses and female HCW are at highest risk for developing mental health symptoms. The main personal concerns associated with reporting mental health symptoms among ICU HCW were worries about transmitting COVID-19 to their families, worries about their own health, witnessing colleagues contract the disease, and experiencing stigma from their communities. Major modifiable work-related risk factors were experiencing poor communication from supervisors, perceived lack of support from administrative leadership, and concerns about insufficient access to personal protective equipment, inability to rest, witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions, and restriction of family visitation policies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted ICU HCW worldwide. The psychological trauma, manifesting as posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, anxiety, and depression, is substantial and concerning. Urgent action by lawmakers and healthcare administrators is required to protect ICU HCW and sustain a healthy workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology
19.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(2): 2128028, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087642

ABSTRACT

Background: Moral injury is defined as the strong emotional and cognitive reactions following events which clash with someone's moral code, values or expectations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, increased exposure to Potentially Morally Injurious Events (PMIEs) has placed healthcare workers (HCWs) at risk of moral injury. Yet little is known about the lived experience of cumulative PMIE exposure and how NHS staff respond to this. Objective: We sought to rectify this knowledge gap by qualitatively exploring the lived experiences and perspectives of clinical frontline NHS staff who responded to COVID-19. Methods: We recruited a diverse sample of 30 clinical frontline HCWs from the NHS CHECK study cohort, for single time point qualitative interviews. All participants endorsed at least one item on the 9-item Moral Injury Events Scale (MIES) [Nash et al., 2013. Psychometric evaluation of the moral injury events scale. Military Medicine, 178(6), 646-652] at six month follow up. Interviews followed a semi-structured guide and were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Results: HCWs described being routinely exposed to ethical conflicts, created by exacerbations of pre-existing systemic issues including inadequate staffing and resourcing. We found that HCWs experienced a range of mental health symptoms primarily related to perceptions of institutional betrayal as well as feeling unable to fulfil their duty of care towards patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that a multi-facetted organisational strategy is warranted to prepare for PMIE exposure, promote opportunities for resolution of symptoms associated with moral injury and prevent organisational disengagement. HIGHLIGHTS Clinical frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) have been exposed to an accumulation of potentially morally injurious events (PMIEs) throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, including feeling betrayed by both government and NHS leaders as well as feeling unable to provide duty of care to patients.HCWs described the significant adverse impact of this exposure on their mental health, including increased anxiety and depression symptoms and sleep disturbance.Most HCWs interviewed believed that organisational change within the NHS was necessary to prevent excess PMIE exposure and promote resolution of moral distress.


Antecedentes: El daño moral se define como las fuertes reacciones emocionales y cognitivas que siguen a los eventos que chocan con el código moral de una persona, sus valores o expectativas. Durante la pandemia de COVID-19, el aumento de la exposición a Eventos Potencialmente Dañinos para la Moral (PMIEs, por su sigla en inglés) ha puesto a los trabajadores de la salud (HCWs, por su sigla en inglés) en riesgo de daño moral. Aún se conoce poco sobre la experiencia vivida de la exposición acumulada a PMIE y cómo el personal del Servicio Nacional de Salud de Inglaterra (NHS en su sigla en inglés) responde a esto.Objetivo: Buscamos rectificar esta brecha de conocimiento a través de la exploración cualitativa de las experiencias vividas y perspectivas del personal clínico de primera línea de NHS que respondió al COVID-19.Métodos: Reclutamos una muestra diversa de 30 HCWs clínicos de primera línea de la cohorte del estudio CHECK del NHS, para entrevistas cualitativas de una sola vez. Todos los participantes aprobaron al menos un ítem de los 9 de la Escala de Eventos de Daño Moral (MIES) [Nash y cols., 2013. Psychometric evaluation of the moral injury events scale. Military Medicine, 178(6), 646­652] en el seguimiento a los 6 meses. Las entrevistas siguieron una guía semi-estructurada y fueron analizadas utilizando análisis temático reflexivo.Resultados: Los HCWs describieron estar expuestos de forma rutinaria a conflictos éticos, creados por exacerbación de problemas sistémicos pre-existentes que incluían falta de personal y de recursos. Encontramos que los HCWs experimentaron un rango de síntomas de salud mental primariamente relacionados a percepciones de traición institucional y al sentirse incapaces de cumplir con su deber de cuidado hacia los pacientes.Conclusión: Estos resultados sugieren que se requiere una estrategia organizacional multifacética para preparar para la exposición a PMIE fomentar oportunidades de resolución de los síntomas asociados al daño moral y prevenir la separación organizacional.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Morals
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082313

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has posed a profound psychological impact on healthcare workers. However, the role of positive affect in moderating the effect of perceived stress on the psychological states of healthcare workers remains unknown. This study aimed to analyze the moderating effect of positive affect on the association between stress and the mental health of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional study evaluated the relationships between perceived stress (the Perceived Stress Scale), positive affect (the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule), depression (the Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and anxiety (the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale) during the COVID-19 pandemic in 644 Chinese healthcare workers who completed online self-reports. The results revealed a significant negative association between positive affect and psychological problems, including stress, depression, and anxiety. At the total group level, multiple regression analysis showed that positive affect alleviated the influence of perceived stress on depression, but no significant moderating effect was found for anxiety. In the subgroups divided by perceived stress, the moderating effect of positive affect on depression was only significant in healthcare workers with a high level of perceived stress. These results suggested that positive affect played a moderative role in alleviating the effect of stress on depression among healthcare workers, particularly those with a high level of stress, thus emphasizing the importance of positive affect as an intervention strategy for promoting the mental health of healthcare workers in the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
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