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PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277969, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140677

ABSTRACT

Nudging is a method for eliciting a desired behavior. One approach to nudging involves information provision. When information presented for this purpose is designed from an evolutionary perspective, it may reveal a deeper level of rationality within human decision-making that might otherwise appear to be irrational. Based on insights from the evolution of altruism, we previously designed a message to remind people of the benefits they have received from the actions of relatives to realize industrialization. We then demonstrated that using this message in Japan was effective at moderating extreme risk-averse attitudes toward air pollution resulting from industrialization. However, the universality of the intervention effect, including whether it could be affected by exogenous factors, was not explored. Therefore, in the present study, we conducted a randomized controlled trial based on an online survey carried out in Japan, Canada, and the US. The intervention was shown to be effective in all the three countries, but the effect size varied according to segment. Although women showed more intervention effects than men in Japan and the US, no significant sex difference was observed in Canada. In terms of personality traits, higher agreeableness significantly contributed to the intervention effects. The influence of the COVID-19 pandemic, which necessitated many lifestyle changes, was found to weaken the intervention effect by increasing the message effect in the control group. We propose that this effect was caused by an increased perception of familial support in everyday life. These results suggest that the nudge message was universally effective, although the effect size might have been affected by cultural factors and social events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Humans , Female , Male , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Promotion , Attitude
4.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0274043, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140503

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment for COVID-19 prevents hospitalization and death but is underused, especially in racial/ethnic minority and rural populations. Reasons for underuse and inequity may include community member lack of awareness or healthcare access barriers, among others. This study assessed mAbs community awareness and opportunities for improving equitable mAb access. METHODS: A concurrent mixed methods study including surveys and focus groups with adults with high-risk conditions or their proxy decision-makers. Surveys and focus group guides addressed diffusion of innovation theory factors. Descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact method was used to report and compare survey findings by race and ethnicity. Rapid qualitative methods were used for focus group analysis. RESULTS: Surveys from 515 individuals (460 English, 54 Spanish, 1 Amharic), and 8 focus groups (6 English, 2 Spanish) with 69 participants, completed June 2021 to January 2022. Most survey respondents (75%) had heard little or nothing about mAbs, but 95% would consider getting mAb treatment. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic People of Color (POC) reported less awareness, greater concern about intravenous infusions, and less trust in mAb safety and effectiveness than White, Non-Hispanic respondents. Focus group themes included little awareness but high interest in mAb treatment and concerns about cost and access barriers such as lacking established sources of care and travel from rural communities. Focus groups revealed preferences for broad-reaching but tailored messaging strategies using multiple media and trusted community leaders. CONCLUSIONS: Despite unfamiliarity with mAb treatment, most respondents were open to receiving mAbs or recommending mAbs to others. While mAb messaging should have broad reach "to everyone everywhere," racial and geographic disparities in awareness and trust about mAbs underscore need for tailored messaging to promote equitable access. Care processes should address patient-level barriers like transportation, insurance, or primary care access. COVID-19 treatment dissemination strategies should promote health equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethnicity , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Minority Groups , Health Promotion
5.
Health Promot Pract ; 23(1_suppl): 108S-117S, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2138962

ABSTRACT

Central Illinois breastfeeding rates fall short of the recommendation to breastfeed exclusively through 6 months, and Black, low-income, and rural families disproportionately experience low rates. A continuity of care framework, which emphasizes interdisciplinary coordination from the prenatal period through weaning, can support breastfeeding. This case study describes an innovative practice model informed by the Collective Impact Model (CIM) designed to promote breastfeeding continuity of care and community support in Central Illinois. Development and maintenance of the Central Illinois Breastfeeding Professional Network (CIBPN), a network of diverse public health practitioners, leveraged CIM principles. The CIBPN began with influential Breastfeeding Champions, identified through the Illinois State Physical Activity and Nutrition program. Champions convened Central Illinois breastfeeding allies and led the CIBPN to coalesce around a common agenda and engage in mutually reinforcing activities. Linked breastfeeding data for families giving birth at a Central Illinois hospital and receiving postnatal care at a health center were analyzed as a snapshot of CIBPN initiatives. The CIBPN engaged at least 135 practitioners and more than 27 organizations. At least 33 people received advanced breastfeeding training, and many professional development opportunities were offered. Numerous breastfeeding support improvements were made at and between CIBPN sites. Breastfeeding rates at the birthing hospital and health center were stable, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article contributes to the practice-based evidence for breastfeeding support by strengthening continuity of care through a successful application of the CIM by public health practitioners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Postnatal Care , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Breast Feeding , Pandemics , Health Promotion , Illinois , Continuity of Patient Care
6.
J Surg Orthop Adv ; 31(3): 150-154, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2125756

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presented a novel challenge to modern healthcare systems and medical training. Resource allocation and risk mitigation dramatically affected resident training. The objective of this article is to develop new strategies to maintain a healthy, competent residency program while combating the unique challenges to resident education and wellness. In 2020, our institution implemented a revolving 3-Team system. While the "Inpatient-Team" delivered direct care, the "Back-up Team" and "Quarantine-Team" managed the telemedicine virtual clinic and education-wellness strategy, respectively. Our 3-Team system allowed delivery of safe, high-quality patient care while optimizing resident education, research, and wellness. The efficient use of technology led to both improved virtual education outside of the hospital and intentional wellness opportunities despite social distancing restrictions. Utilization of virtual platforms for patient care, education, research, and wellness grew out of necessity in this pandemic, yet represent an opportunity for lasting improvement. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 31(3):150-154, 2022).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Health Promotion
7.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 771, 2022 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community-based physical activity (PA) programs are appealing to women in Latin America and show potential for improving women's health. This study aimed to engage healthy middle-aged women, breast cancer survivors and local stakeholders participating in two publicly funded community-based PA programs in Bogotá, Colombia (Recreovía and My Body) to assess and visually map the perceived barriers, facilitators, and outcomes to promote programs' improvement, scaling and sustainability. METHODS: We used two participatory action research methods, the 1) Our Voice citizen science method to capture data and drive local change in built and social environmental facilitators and barriers that influence women's engagement in community-based PA; and 2) Ripple Effects Mapping to visually map the intended and unintended outcomes of PA programs. We used thematic analysis to classify the results at the individual, social, and community levels. RESULTS: The stakeholders engaged in the participatory evaluation included cross-sector actors from the programs (N = 6) and program users (total N = 34) from the two programs (Recreovía N = 16; My Body N = 18). Program users were women with a mean age of 55.7 years (SD = 8.03), 65% lived in low-income neighborhoods. They identified infrastructure as the main feature affecting PA, having both positive (e.g., appropriate facilities) and negative (e.g., poorly built areas for PA) effects. Regarding program improvements, stakeholders advocated for parks' cleaning, safety, and appropriate use. The most highlighted outcomes were the expansion and strengthening of social bonds and the engagement in collective wellbeing, which leveraged some participants' leadership skills for PA promotion strategies in their community. The facilitated dialogue among program users and stakeholders fostered the sustainability and expansion of the community-based PA programs, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of both participatory methodologies provided a multidimensional understanding of the programs' impacts and multisectoral dialogues that fostered efforts to sustain the community-based PA programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Colombia , Exercise , Female , Health Promotion , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Residence Characteristics
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110068

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the allocation of basic medical services and ensuring their equity are necessary to improve the ability to respond to public health emergencies and promote health equity in the context of COVID-19. This study aims to analyze the equity of Guangzhou's basic medical service and identify areas where health resources are relatively scarce. The spatial distribution and patterns of basic medical services were analyzed using kernel density analysis and standard deviation ellipse. The equity was analyzed using the Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve in terms of population and geographical area, respectively. Considering the medical demand and supply sides, the Gaussian two-step floating catchment area method was used to analyze the accessibility to different levels of medical institutions. The kernel density analysis and standard deviation ellipse showed that the spatial distribution of medical and health resources in Guangzhou is unevenly distributed, and high-level hospitals and medical resources are mainly concentrated in the centrum. From the perspective of population, Guangzhou's medical equity is generally reasonable. The accessibility of medical institutions differs with different levels, and the tertiary medical institutions have the best accessibility, while the unclassified, primary, and secondary medical institutions generally have lower accessibility. The accessibility of districts in Guangzhou varies greatly. Areas in the center are most accessible to basic medical services, while accessibility in outskirt areas has gradually decreased. Conclusion: The quantity of per capita medical and health resources in Guangzhou, as evidenced by basic medical services, is sufficient, but the spatial distribution is unequal. The developed city center enjoys more adequate healthcare resources than the distant suburbs. Primary healthcare should be built, especially in distant suburbs, to strengthen basic medical service equity in Guangzhou.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Promotion , Catchment Area, Health , Health Resources
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1002209, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109883

ABSTRACT

Racial and ethnic minority communities have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, but the uptake of COVID-19 mitigation strategies like vaccination and testing have been slower in these populations. With the continued spread of COVID-19 while in-person learning is a priority, school-aged youth and their caregivers must make health-related decisions daily to ensure health at school. It is critical to understand factors associated with COVID-related health decisions such as vaccination, testing, and other health behaviors (e.g., wearing masks, hand washing). Community-engaged campaigns are necessary to overcome barriers to these health behaviors and promote health equity. The aim of this study was to examine COVID-19-related concerns and influences on health decisions in middle and high schools serving primarily racial and ethnic minority, low-income families. Seven focus groups were conducted with school staff, parents, and students (aged 16 years and older). Qualitative data were analyzed using a general inductive approach. Factors related to COVID-19 concerns and health decisions centered on (1) vaccine hesitancy, (2) testing hesitancy, (3) developmental stage (i.e., ability to engage in health behaviors based on developmental factors like age), (4) cultural and family traditions and beliefs, (5) compatibility of policies and places with recommended health behaviors, (6) reliability of information, and (7) perceived risk. We explore sub-themes in further detail. It is important to understand the community's level of concern and identify factors that influence COVID-19 medical decision making to better address disparities in COVID-19 testing and vaccination uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethnicity , Adolescent , Humans , Child , Health Promotion , Minority Groups , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ethnic and Racial Minorities , COVID-19 Testing , Reproducibility of Results
11.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221133076, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108669

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionally affected historically marginalized populations and their access to resources and healthcare. In times of crisis, authentic community engagement is more important than ever. This study was Phase 1 of a larger 3-phase study to conduct timely community-engaged research with community members to understand the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on historically underserved communities. The objective of this work was to conduct key informant (KI) interviews (1) to understand community organizations perspectives about the role that large academic health centers play as they interface with community organizations to support their work, (2) to leverage KI's expertise to identify needs and assets within the community, and (3) to inform both Phase 2 (focus group qualitative research) and Phase 3 (survey) of the broader study. METHODS: A total of 24 key informants were identified through purposeful sampling and one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted across 4 states using video conferencing. RESULTS: Barriers to access and lack of transparency were highlighted as major issues requiring reform-in particular, aggressive billing practices and insurance barriers exacerbated local distrust of medical institutions. KIs recognized the health institution's support for testing and vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic, but noted other significant gaps in care, especially regarding mental health support. Although communication with the health institution was consistent for some KIs, others experienced unsustained communication efforts that hindered cooperation and relationship building. CONCLUSIONS: Leaders in the community as key stakeholders can provide unique insights into the challenges and potential solutions required to promote health equity, and foster understanding between local communities and healthcare institutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Health Promotion , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Qualitative Research
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099527

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 caused significant changes in economies and societies with a major impact on the entire education process. However, these changes did not invalidate a constant effort of adaptation. This cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational study used an online questionnaire administered to students from various study cycles at higher education institutions in Portugal, with the aim of exploring the influence of literacy and mental health on the use of mental health promotion strategies during COVID-19 confinement. A total of 329 students from higher education institutions participated in this study, mostly from the age group 18-24 years (n = 272; 82.7%) and female (n = 265, 80.5%). The most mentioned health promotion strategies during this period included studying (n = 170; 51.7%); physical activities (n = 151, 45.9%); social networking (n = 124, 37.7%); cooking activities (n = 120, 36.5%); and listening to music (n = 118, 35.9%). Academic success is self-reported, and it is weakly correlated with the MHI5 (r = 0.103, p = 0.063). Students in the pre-graduate programs studied more during the times of the pandemic and used this activity as a mental-health-promoting strategy with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.033). Although it was difficult to improve health literacy related to COVID-19 in such a short period of time, there was a very strong motivation to access, understand, evaluate, communicate, synthesize, and apply information and knowledge to maintain mental health through self-care using health promotion strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , Portugal/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Students , Health Promotion
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099476

ABSTRACT

Brown and Isaacs' World Café is a participatory research method to make connections to the ideas of others. During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the corresponding contact restrictions, only digital hostings of World Cafés were possible. This article aims to present and reflect on the potentials and challenges of hosting online World Cafés and to derive recommendations for other researchers. Via Zoom and Conceptboard, three online World Cafés were conducted in August 2021. In the World Cafés, the main focus was on the increasing digitization in settings in the context of health promotion and prevention from the perspective of setting members of educational institutions, leisure clubs, and communities. Between 9 and 13 participants participated in three World Cafés. Hosting comprises the phases of design and preparation, realisation, and evaluation. Generally, hosting an online World Café is a suitable method for participatory engagement, but particular challenges have to be overcome. Overall café hosts must create an equal participation environment by ensuring the availability of digital devices and stable internet access. The event schedule must react flexibly to technical disruptions and varying participation numbers. Further, compensatory measures such as support in the form of technical training must be implemented before the event. Finally, due to the higher complexity of digitalisation, roles of participants and staff need to be distributed and coordinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion , Humans
14.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 27: 43, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098633

ABSTRACT

Humans have enjoyed forest environments for ages because of the quiet atmosphere, beautiful scenery, mild climate, pleasant aromas, and fresh, clean air. In Japan, since 2004, serial studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of forest environments (Forest bathing/Shinrin-yoku) on human health. My research team has established a new medical science called Forest Medicine. The Forest Medicine is a new interdisciplinary science, belonging to the categories of alternative medicine, environmental medicine and preventive medicine, which studies the effects of forest environments (Forest bathing/Shinrin-yoku) on human health. It has been reported that Forest bathing/Shinrin-yoku has the following beneficial effects on human health:1 Shinrin-yoku increases human natural killer (NK) activity, the number of NK cells, and the intracellular levels of anti-cancer proteins, suggesting a preventive effect on cancers. 2 Shinrin-yoku reduces blood pressure and heart rate showing preventive effect on hypertension and heart diseases. 3 Shinrin-yoku reduces stress hormones, such as urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline and salivary/serum cortisol contributing to stress management. 4 Shinrin-yoku increases the activity of parasympathetic nerves and reduces the activity of sympathetic nerves to stabilize the balance of autonomic nervous system. 5 Shinrin-yoku improve sleep. 6 Shinrin-yoku increases the levels of serum adiponectin and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. 7 In the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test, Shinrin-yoku reduces the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion, and increases the score for vigor, showing preventive effects on depression. 8 Shinrin-yoku may apply to rehabilitation medicine 9 Shinrin-yoku in city parks also has benefits on human health. 10 Shinrin-yoku may have preventive effect on COVID-19 by boosting immune function and by reducing mental stress.Taken together, these findings suggest that Shinrin-yoku may have potential preventive effects on non-communicable diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Walking , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Forests , Blood Pressure , Health Promotion
15.
J Phys Act Health ; 19(11): 700-728, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088378

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Global Matrix 4.0 on physical activity (PA) for children and adolescents was developed to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the global variation in children's and adolescents' (5-17 y) PA, related measures, and key sources of influence. The objectives of this article were (1) to summarize the findings from the Global Matrix 4.0 Report Cards, (2) to compare indicators across countries, and (3) to explore trends related to the Human Development Index and geo-cultural regions. METHODS: A total of 57 Report Card teams followed a harmonized process to grade the 10 common PA indicators. An online survey was conducted to collect Report Card Leaders' top 3 priorities for each PA indicator and their opinions on how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted child and adolescent PA indicators in their country. RESULTS: Overall Physical Activity was the indicator with the lowest global average grade (D), while School and Community and Environment were the indicators with the highest global average grade (C+). An overview of the global situation in terms of surveillance and prevalence is provided for all 10 common PA indicators, followed by priorities and examples to support the development of strategies and policies internationally. CONCLUSIONS: The Global Matrix 4.0 represents the largest compilation of children's and adolescents' PA indicators to date. While variation in data sources informing the grades across countries was observed, this initiative highlighted low PA levels in children and adolescents globally. Measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, local/international conflicts, climate change, and economic change threaten to worsen this situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Health Promotion/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Policy , Research Report
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1935, 2022 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community Heart Health Actions for Latinos at Risk (CHARLAR) is a promotora-led cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk-reduction program for socio-demographically disadvantaged Latinos and consists of 11 skill-building sessions. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to worsening health status in U.S. adults and necessitated transition to virtual implementation of the CHARLAR program. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate virtual delivery of CHARLAR. Changes in health behaviors were assessed through a pre/post program survey. Results from virtual and historical (in-person delivery) were compared. Key informant interviews were conducted with promotoras and randomly selected participants and then coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. RESULTS: An increase in days of exercise per week (+ 1.52), daily servings of fruit (+ 0.60) and vegetables (+ 0.56), and self-reported general health (+ 0.38), were observed in the virtual cohort [all p < 0.05]. A numeric decrease in PHQ-8 (-1.07 p = 0.067) was also noted. The historical cohort showed similar improvements from baseline in days of exercise per week (+ 0.91), daily servings of fruit (+ 0.244) and vegetables (+ 0.282), and PHQ-8 (-1.89) [all p < 0.05]. Qualitative interviews revealed that the online format provided valuable tools supporting positive behavior change. Despite initial discomfort and technical challenges, promotoras and participants adapted and deepened valued relationships through additional virtual support. CONCLUSION: Improved health behaviors and CVD risk factors were successfully maintained through virtual delivery of the CHARLAR program. Optimization of virtual health programs like CHARLAR has the potential to increase reach and improve CVD risk among Latinos.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Health Promotion/methods , Hispanic or Latino , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071382

ABSTRACT

In recent years, national and local efforts to improve diet and health in the United States have stressed the importance of nutrition security, which emphasizes consistent access to foods and beverages that promote health and prevent disease among all individuals. At the core of this endeavor is fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption, a dietary practice that is integral to attaining and sustaining a healthy diet. Unfortunately, significant inequities in FV accessibility, purchasing, and consumption exist, particularly among populations that are socially and economically disadvantaged. To achieve nutrition and health equity in the United States, the field must center the goal of nutrition security and initiatives that aim to increase FV consumption, specifically, in future work. The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) Special Issue titled "Nutrition and Health Equity: Revisiting the Importance of Fruit and Vegetable Availability, Purchasing, and Consumption" features several scholarly publications from experts conducting timely research on these topics. In this commentary, we (1) summarize the U.S.-based literature on inequities in FV accessibility, purchasing, and consumption, (2) describe how the contributions to this IJERPH special issue can advance nutrition security and health equity, and (3) outline future research questions from our perspective.


Subject(s)
Health Equity , Vegetables , Diet , Feeding Behavior , Fruit , Health Promotion , Humans , United States
18.
Health Psychol Rev ; 16(4): 475-491, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1728789

ABSTRACT

In this White Paper, we outline recommendations from the perspective of health psychology and behavioural science, addressing three research gaps: (1) What methods in the health psychology research toolkit can be best used for developing and evaluating digital health tools? (2) What are the most feasible strategies to reuse digital health tools across populations and settings? (3) What are the main advantages and challenges of sharing (openly publishing) data, code, intervention content and design features of digital health tools? We provide actionable suggestions for researchers joining the continuously growing Open Digital Health movement, poised to revolutionise health psychology research and practice in the coming years. This White Paper is positioned in the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic, exploring how digital health tools have rapidly gained popularity in 2020-2022, when world-wide health promotion and treatment efforts rapidly shifted from face-to-face to remote delivery. This statement is written by the Directors of the not-for-profit Open Digital Health initiative (n = 6), Experts attending the European Health Psychology Society Synergy Expert Meeting (n = 17), and the initiative consultant, following a two-day meeting (19-20th August 2021).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Promotion , Global Health
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065912

ABSTRACT

Mental health literacy (MHL) interventions in secondary schools may help to improve competencies that adolescents require to stay mentally healthy and seek help if mental health problems arise. These MHL interventions should be tailored to the needs of adolescents and educational professionals (EPs) to reach sustainable implementation and long-term effectiveness. However, evidence is lacking on these needs. Thus, our aim was to explore their experiences with, and perspectives on, mental health help seeking and needs regarding MHL interventions. We performed online focus group discussions and interviews with adolescents (n = 21; 13-19 years) and EPs (n = 12) and analyzed the data using directed content analysis. We identified three themes related to mental health help seeking: (1) Limited MHL competencies of adolescents, (2) Limited competencies of EP to provide mental health support, and (3) Limited mental health promotion in the school environment. We further identified three themes regarding MHL interventions: (1) Addressing basic mental health knowledge and skills, (2) Interactive and easily accessible, and (3) Sustainable implementation. Improving the MHL competencies of adolescents and EPs, and creating a mental health-literate school environment can promote adolescents' mental health help seeking. Our findings highlight the importance of developing MHL interventions that are tailored to both adolescents' and EPs needs.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Help-Seeking Behavior , Adolescent , Health Promotion , Health Status , Humans , Mental Health
20.
Front Public Health ; 10: 962862, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065647

ABSTRACT

Background: Latinx communities are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 compared with non-Latinx White communities in Oregon and much of the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic presents a critical and urgent need to reach Latinx communities with innovative, culturally tailored outreach and health promotion interventions to reduce viral transmission and address disparities. The aims of this case study are to (1) outline the collaborative development of a culturally and trauma-informed COVID-19 preventive intervention for Latinx communities; (2) describe essential intervention elements; and (3) summarize strengths and lessons learned for future applications. Methods: Between June 2020 and January 2021, a multidisciplinary team of researchers and Latinx-serving partners engaged in the following intervention development activities: a scientific literature review, a survey of 67 Latinx residents attending public testing events, interviews with 13 leaders of community-based organizations serving Latinx residents, and bi-weekly consultations with the project's Public Health and Community Services Team and a regional Community and Scientific Advisory Board. After launching the intervention in the field in February 2021, bi-weekly meetings with interventionists continuously informed minor iterative refinements through present day. Results: The resulting intervention, Promotores de Salud, includes outreach and brief health education. Bilingual, trauma-informed trainings and materials reflect the lived experiences, cultural values, needs, and concerns of Latinx communities. Interventionists (21 Promotores) were Latinx residents from nine Oregon counties where the intervention was delivered. Conclusions: Sharing development and intervention details with public health researchers and practitioners facilitates intervention uptake and replication to optimize the public health effect in Oregon's Latinx communities and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion , Hispanic or Latino , Humans , Oregon , Pandemics , United States
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