Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 60
Filter
1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(3): 397-400, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701451

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, media accounts emerged describing faith-based organizations (FBOs) working alongside health departments to support the COVID-19 response. In May 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) sent an electronic survey to the 59 ASTHO member jurisdictions and four major US cities to assess state and territorial engagement with FBOs. Findings suggest that public health officials in many jurisdictions were able to work effectively with FBOs during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide essential education and mitigation tools to diverse communities. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(3):397-400. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306620).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faith-Based Organizations/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Community-Institutional Relations , Faith-Based Organizations/economics , Health Equity , Health Promotion/economics , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health Administration , SARS-CoV-2 , State Government , United States/epidemiology , /ethnology
3.
JAMA Intern Med ; 182(3): 324-331, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661562

ABSTRACT

Importance: Identifying successful strategies to increase COVID-19 vaccination among skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents and staff is integral to preventing future outbreaks in a continually overwhelmed system. Objective: To determine whether a multicomponent vaccine campaign would increase vaccine rates among SNF residents and staff. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a cluster randomized trial with a rapid timeline (December 2020-March 2021) coinciding with the Pharmacy Partnership Program (PPP). It included 133 SNFs in 4 health care systems across 16 states: 63 and 70 facilities in the intervention and control arms, respectively, and participants included 7496 long-stay residents (>100 days) and 17 963 staff. Interventions: Multicomponent interventions were introduced at the facility level that included: (1) educational material and electronic messaging for staff; (2) town hall meetings with frontline staff (nurses, nurse aides, dietary, housekeeping); (3) messaging from community leaders; (4) gifts (eg, T-shirts) with socially concerned messaging; (5) use of a specialist to facilitate consent with residents' proxies; and (6) funds for additional COVID-19 testing of staff/residents. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcomes of this study were the proportion of residents (from electronic medical records) and staff (from facility logs) who received a COVID-19 vaccine (any), examined as 2 separate outcomes. Mixed-effects generalized linear models with a binomial distribution were used to compare outcomes between arms, using intent-to-treat approach. Race was examined as an effect modifier in the resident outcome model. Results: Most facilities were for-profit (95; 71.4%), and 1973 (26.3%) of residents were Black. Among residents, 82.5% (95% CI, 81.2%-83.7%) were vaccinated in the intervention arm, compared with 79.8% (95% CI, 78.5%-81.0%) in the usual care arm (marginal difference 0.8%; 95% CI, -1.9% to 3.7%). Among staff, 49.5% (95% CI, 48.4%-50.6%) were vaccinated in the intervention arm, compared with 47.9% (95% CI, 46.9%-48.9%) in usual care arm (marginal difference: -0.4%; 95% CI, -4.2% to 3.1%). There was no association of race with the outcome among residents. Conclusions and Relevance: A multicomponent vaccine campaign did not have a significant effect on vaccination rates among SNF residents or staff. Among residents, vaccination rates were high. However, half the staff remained unvaccinated despite these efforts. Vaccination campaigns to target SNF staff will likely need to use additional approaches. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04732819.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 29-33, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597066

ABSTRACT

Minority populations have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and disparities have been noted in vaccine uptake. In the state of Arkansas, health equity strike teams (HESTs) were deployed to address vaccine disparities. A total of 13 470 vaccinations were administered by HESTs to 10 047 eligible people at 45 events. Among these individuals, 5645 (56.2%) were African American, 2547 (25.3%) were White, and 1068 (10.6%) were Hispanic. Vaccination efforts must specifically target populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):29-33. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306564).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Equity/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Arkansas , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Social Determinants of Health
7.
Am J Public Health ; 111(12): 2111-2114, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562083

ABSTRACT

The University of Wisconsin Neighborhood Health Partnerships Program used electronic health record and influenza vaccination data to estimate COVID-19 relative mortality risk and potential barriers to vaccination in Wisconsin ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Data visualization revealed four groupings to use in planning and prioritizing vaccine outreach and communication based on ZIP Code Tabulation Area characteristics. The program provided data, visualization, and guidance to health systems, health departments, nonprofits, and others to support planning targeted outreach approaches to increase COVID-19 vaccination uptake. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(12):2111-2114. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306524).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Trust , Wisconsin/epidemiology
8.
Front Health Serv Manage ; 38(1): 32-38, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455390

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Fighting the global COVID-19 pandemic has shifted from immediate response efforts to recognition of the long-term effects on the mental health and well-being of the general population and healthcare workforce. Leaders need to understand the vital role of behavioral health services in a population-based, integrated healthcare framework and address the needs of the behavioral health workforce to successfully deploy services in their organizations and communities.During the ongoing national response to COVID-19, three major trends have emerged: (1) a shift to telehealth and digital care, (2) greater awareness of the impact on the workforce of the shift to digital care, and (3) an open dialogue to counteract the stigma and discrimination related to mental illness and to emphasize mental well-being instead. When they address stigma and discrimination, healthcare leaders embrace a more holistic approach that welcomes behavioral health professionals as equal, vital members of the care team. They help their organizations advance the mental well-being of all.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Social Stigma , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Objectives , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
9.
Front Health Serv Manage ; 38(1): 39-44, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455388

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: Well-being, engagement, and burnout among clinicians are interconnected, and the common denominator is energy. Decades of research show that employees' energy is a decisive factor in achieving organizational outcomes. Knowing this, healthcare leaders can create well-being programs with measurable outcomes that make a positive impact on the bottom line. Just as important, leaders can avoid wasting money on fruitless efforts. How can clinician well-being be incorporated in organizational culture and strategic and operational plans? What are the special challenges to achieving clinician well-being? What key leadership actions promote and protect the well-being of clinicians? Which approaches are most effective during a crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic? This article addresses those questions by presenting the rationale and methodology behind well-being programs that also address engagement and burnout so that clinicians can succeed in times of crisis and beyond.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Work Engagement , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Culture , Organizational Objectives , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 199-213, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is to compare the emotional effects of COVID-19 among three different groups, namely: health personnel, medical students, and a sample of the general population. METHODS: 375 participants were recruited for this study, of which 125 were medical students (preclinical studies, 59; clinical studies, 66), 125 were health personnel (COVID-19 frontline personnel, 59; personnel not related with COVID-19, 66), and 125 belonged to the general population. The PHQ-9, GAD-7, and CPDI scales were used to assess the emotional impact. A multinomial logistic regression was performed to measure differences between groups, considering potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Regarding CPDI values, all other groups showed reduced values compared to COVID-19 frontline personnel. However, the general population, preclinical and clinical medical students showed increased PHQ-9 values compared to COVID-19 frontline personnel. Finally, confounding factors, gender and age correlated negatively with higher CPDI and PHQ-9 scores. CONCLUSIONS: Being frontline personnel is associated with increased COVID-19-related stress. Depression is associated, however, with other groups not directly involved with the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Female gender and younger age correlated with COVID-19-related depression and stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services , Preventive Health Services/methods , Student Health Services/methods , Students/psychology , Teaching/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/methods , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Humans , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Health , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Preventive Health Services/organization & administration , Student Health Services/organization & administration , Universities , Young Adult
13.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 111, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tooth decay is one of the diseases that is closely related to people's behaviors and it can have adverse effects on their performance and their success in the future. Brushing twice a day is the simplest and most effective way to reduce tooth decay. The study aim was to determining the roles of correlational factors based on the Pender's health promotion model in brushing behavior of ninth grade students at urban public schools of Guilan province during the academic year 2019. METHODS: The present study was cross-sectional and had a descriptive-analytical type. We performed the multi-stage random sampling on 761 ninth-grade students (374 girls and 387 boys) at urban public schools of six counties (ten cities) of Guilan province in 2019. The primary tool was a questionnaire on oral health behaviors focusing on brushing behavior. In the present study, which was conducted only on brushing behavior, we revised and changed the initial questionnaire during the sessions of the research team, and then confirmed its validity and reliability. The questionnaire consisted of three parts, demographic characteristics, constructs of health promotion model, and brushing behavior. We analyzed data in SPSS 21 using regression models. RESULTS: 20.1% of students brushed their teeth at least twice a day. Optimal behavior had a statistically significant relationship with parents' education level, and gender. Based on the regression model, the health promotion model constructs described 58% of the variance of the commitment to plan of action. Perceived self-efficacy, situational influences, and perceived barriers of action had significantly stronger relationships with commitment to plan of action respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that one-unit increase in scores of commitment to plan of action and self-efficacy increased the chance of desired behavior by 12 and 14% respectively. CONCLUSION: Due to the low rate of brushing behavior in the students and the predictive power of the health promotion model in brushing behavior, we suggest planning and implementation of educational interventions for this group with an emphasis on influencing the commitment to plan of action, self-efficacy, and also the level of knowledge.


Subject(s)
Dental Caries/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Toothbrushing , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(7): e27448, 2021 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic presented many sudden challenges regarding food, including grocery shopping changes (eg, reduced store hours, capacity restrictions, and empty store shelves due to food hoarding), restaurant closures, the need to cook more at home, and closures of food access programs. Eat Well Saskatchewan (EWS) implemented a 16-week social media campaign, #eatwellcovid19, led by a dietitian and nutrition student that focused on sharing stories submitted by the Saskatchewan public about how they were eating healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to describe the implementation of the #eatwellcovid19 social media campaign and the results from the evaluation of the campaign, which included campaign performance using social media metrics and experiences and perspectives of campaign followers. METHODS: Residents of Saskatchewan, Canada, were invited to submit personal stories and experiences to EWS about how they were eating healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic from April to August 2020. Each week, one to three stories were featured on EWS social media platforms-Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter-along with evidence-based nutrition information to help residents become more resilient to challenges related to food and nutrition experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals who submitted stories were entered into a weekly draw for a Can $100 grocery gift card. Social media metrics and semistructured qualitative interviews of campaign followers were used to evaluate the #eatwellcovid19 campaign. RESULTS: In total, 75 stories were submitted by 74 individuals on a variety of topics (eg, grocery shopping, traditional skills, and gardening), and 42 stories were featured on social media. EWS shared 194 #eatwellcovid19 posts across social media platforms (Facebook: n=100; Instagram: n=55; and Twitter: n=39). On Facebook, #eatawellcovid19 reached 100,571 followers and left 128,818 impressions, resulting in 9575 engagements. On Instagram, the campaign reached 11,310 followers, made 14,145 impressions, and received 823 likes and 15 comments. On Twitter, #eatwellcovid19 made 15,199 impressions and received 424 engagements. Featured story submission posts had the best engagement on Facebook and the most likes and comments on Instagram. The EWS social media pages reported increases in their following during the campaign (Instagram: +30%; Facebook: +14%; and Twitter: +12%). Results from the interviews revealed that there were two types of campaign followers: those who appreciated hearing the stories submitted by followers, as it helped them to feel connected to the community during social isolation, and those who appreciated the evidence-based information. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous stories were submitted to the #eatwellcovid19 social media campaign on various topics. On Instagram and Facebook, posts that featured these stories had the highest engagement. During this campaign, EWS's social media following increased by more than 10% on each platform. The approach used for the #eatwellcovid19 campaign could be considered by others looking to develop health promotion campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Healthy , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Health Promotion/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Saskatchewan/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
J Health Commun ; 26(6): 402-412, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320274

ABSTRACT

As the United States continues to be ravaged by COVID-19, it becomes increasingly important to implement effective public health campaigns to improve personal behaviors that help control the spread of the virus. To design effective campaigns, research is needed to understand the current mitigation intentions of the general public, diversity in those intentions, and theoretical predictors of them. COVID-19 campaigns will be particularly challenging because mitigation involves myriad, diverse behaviors. This study takes a person-centered approach to investigate data from a survey (N = 976) of Pennsylvania adults. Latent class analysis revealed five classes of mitigation: one marked by complete adherence with health recommendations (34% of the sample), one by complete refusal (9% of the sample), and three by a mixture of adherence and refusal. Statistically significant covariates of class membership included relatively positive injunctive norms, risk due to essential workers in the household, personal knowledge of someone who became infected with COVID-19, and belief that COVID-19 was a leaked biological weapon. Additionally, trait reactance was associated with non-adherence while health mavenism was associated with adherence. These findings may be used to good effect by local healthcare providers and institutions, and also inform broader policy-making decisions regarding public health campaigns to mitigate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 62(1): E25-E32, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264702

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Hand cleansing and disinfection is the most efficient method for reducing the rates of hospital-acquired infections which are a serious medical and economic problem. Striving to ensure the maximum safety of the therapeutic process, we decided to promote hand hygiene by implementing the educational program titled "Clean Care is a Safer Care". The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic affected the compliance with procedures related to the sanitary regime, including the frequency and accuracy of hand decontamination by medical personnel. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess the usefulness of the educational program titled "Clean Care is a Safer Care" as a tool for increasing compliance with hand hygiene principles. METHODS: We monitored the compliance with the hygiene procedure before implementation of the program as well as during the hand hygiene campaign by means of direct observation as well as the disinfectant consumption rates. RESULTS: In the initial self-assessment survey, the hospital had scored 270/500 points (54%). Preliminary audit revealed the hygiene compliance rate at the level of 49%. After broad-scaled educational efforts, the semi-annual audit revealed an increase in hand hygiene compliance rate up to 81% (hospital average) while the final audit carried out after one year of campaigning revealed a compliance rate of 77%. The final score for the hospital increased to 435/500 points. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic dramatically increased accuracy of proper hand hygiene procedures and consumption of disinfectant agents. The educational program has succeeded to reach its goal; however, long-term educational efforts are required to maintain and improve the quality of provided services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guideline Adherence , Hand Hygiene/standards , Personnel, Hospital , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Med Arch ; 75(1): 4-10, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The key considerations for healthy aging are diversity and inequity. Diversity means that there is no typical older person. Policy should be framed to improve the functional ability of all older people, whether they are robust, care dependent or in between. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to describe negative influence of Corona pandemic (COVID-19) for realization of the WHO project about Healthy Aging global strategy proposed in the targets "Health for all". METHODS: Authors used descriptive model for this cross-sectional study based on facts in analyzed scientific literature deposited in on-line databases about healthy aging concept of the prevention and treatment of the people who will come or already came to the "third trimester of the life". RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Some 80-year-olds have levels of physical and mental capacity that compare favorably with 30-year-olds. Others of the same age may require extensive care and support for basic activities like dressing and eating. Policy should be framed to improve the functional ability of all older people, whether they are robust, care dependent or in between. Inequity reflects a large proportion (approximately 75%) of the diversity in capacity and circumstance observed in older age is the result of the cumulative impact of advantage and disadvantage across people's lives. Importantly, the relationships we have with our environments are shaped by factors such as the family we were born into, our sex, ethnicity, level of education and financial resources. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic "celebrated" one year of existing in almost all countries in the world with very difficult consequences for whole population. But in the first risk group are old people who have in average 6 to 7 co-morbidities. WHO recommended some measures to improve prevention and treatment this category of population, but COVID-19 pandemic stopped full realization of Decade of Healthy Aging project.


Subject(s)
Health Promotion/organization & administration , Health Status , Healthy Aging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Geriatrics/standards , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , World Health Organization
19.
J Sch Health ; 91(7): 584-591, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2014, the Hawaii Department of Education (DOE), the only statewide school system in the United States, predominately enrolled children (keiki) from underserved communities and lacked school nurses or a school health program. Chronic absenteeism due to health concerns was identified as a barrier to academic success. METHODS: The DOE and a public university created Hawaii Keiki: Healthy and Ready to Learn (HK), a program to provide school-based services for 170 Title 1 schools in urban and rural settings and build momentum for statewide collective action. HK has maintained support from public and private entities to address student health. RESULTS: This paper describes 5 years of program development, implementation, and continuing challenges. Most recently in 2020-2021, HK pivoted in the face of school campus closings due to COVID-19 with strategic plans, including telehealth, to move forward in this changed school environment. CONCLUSIONS: The HK program has increased awareness of students' needs and is addressing the imperative to build health services within public schools. The multipronged approach of building awareness of need, providing direct services, educating future care providers, and supporting sound policy development, has an impact that goes beyond any one individual area.


Subject(s)
Child Health/statistics & numerical data , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Community Networks/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , School Health Services/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cooperative Behavior , Hawaii , Humans , Program Evaluation
20.
Health Secur ; 19(S1): S41-S49, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219235

ABSTRACT

Vulnerable refugee communities are disproportionately affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic; existing longstanding health inequity in these communities is exacerbated by ineffective risk communication practices about COVID-19. Culturally and linguistically appropriate health communication following health literacy guidelines is needed to dispel cultural myths, social stigma, misinformation, and disinformation. For refugee communities, the physical, mental, and social-related consequences of displacement further complicate understanding of risk communication practices grounded in a Western cultural ethos. We present a case study of Clarkston, Georgia, the "most diverse square mile in America," where half the population is foreign born and majority refugee. Supporting marginalized communities in times of risk will require a multipronged, systemic approach to health communication including: (1) creating a task force of local leaders and community members to deal with emergent issues; (2) expanding English-language education and support for refugees; (3) including refugee perspectives on risk, health, and wellness into risk communication messaging; (4) improving cultural competence and health literacy training for community leaders and healthcare providers; and (5) supporting community health workers. Finally, better prepared public health programs, including partnerships with trusted community organizations and leadership, can ensure that appropriate and supportive risk communication and health education and promotion are in place long before the next emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Community Health Workers/organization & administration , Culturally Competent Care/organization & administration , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Health Status Indicators , Refugees/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Georgia , Humans , Needs Assessment/organization & administration
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL